Welcome to the Lone Star College System!




НазваниеWelcome to the Lone Star College System!
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Graduation Requirements

PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION

The Lone Star College System offers courses and

programs to suit the needs of individual students.

In keeping with the mission of a community

college, the college offers university-parallel or

transfer courses, workforce or career programs,

and continuing education courses for lifelong

learning opportunities.

While individual courses are available in a variety

of subjects and fields of study, many students have

as their educational goal a prescribed program of

study. Students are responsible for taking courses

in the proper sequence and at the proper level

as well as determining the applicability of a

particular course to their educational objectives.

Students who fulfill the requirements of such

programs of study may attain one or more of

the following degrees or certificates:

Associate of Arts Degree (AA) - A collegiate

degree related to the baccalaureate degree.

This is not a degree with a declared

major; rather it is a program of first and

second year courses which will generally

transfer to a four-year college or university.

Requirements are on page 86.

Associate of Science Degree (AS) - A collegiate

degree related to the baccalaureate degree.

This is not a degree with a declared

major; rather it is a program of first and

second year courses which will generally

transfer to a four-year college or university.

Requirements are on page 87.

Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) - A collegiate

degree that will satisfy the lower

division requirements for a bachelor’s

degree leading to initial teacher certification.

Requirements are on pages 88-89.

Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS) - A

degree in a workforce field for students who

wish to begin a career after completing

this program of study. Requirements are

on page 101.

Core Curriculum - The curriculum in liberal arts,

sciences and political, social, and cultural

history that all undergraduate students of

an institution are required to complete

before receiving a degree. Students may

receive a designation for being “core

complete” on their transcripts; however,

to receive an associate degree a student

must also complete the remaining AA or

AS requirements on page 85.

Field of Study - A curriculum that will satisfy the

lower division requirements for a bachelor’s

degree in a specific academic area at a

general academic teaching institution. The

student shall receive full academic credit

toward the degree program for the block

of courses transferred which will meet that

institution’s lower division requirements for

the degree program in the field of study into

which the student transfers. Requirements

are on pages 90-93.

Certificate - A program of study that varies

in length and is designed to prepare the

student for occupational employment.

The certificate is awarded upon completion

of specific courses that have been

industry validated and sequenced for the

purpose of developing and upgrading

skills in an occupation. Requirements

are on page 82.

Area of Concentration - A program which

combines either the associate of arts or associate

of science degree with an emphasis

in a specific academic discipline. Course

transferability for area of concentration

courses should be checked with the transfer

university. (page 93)

Questions regarding course sequence and

degree objectives should be referred to the appropriate

faculty advisor or counseling office.

GRADUATION

REQUIREMENTS

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

LSCS Catalog 2010/2011 79

LSCS Core Perspectives and

Intellectual Competencies

The Lone Star College System has defined student

outcomes and skill development as completion of

their AA and AS degrees and core curriculum.

When appropriate and applicable to the course

content, the faculty will integrate course activities

and assignments that reflect these values,

behaviors, and skills.

Basic Intellectual Competencies in

the Core Curriculum

READING: Reading at the college level means

the ability to analyze and interpret a variety

of printed materials - books, articles, and

documents including both general methods

of analyzing printed materials and specific

methods for analyzing the subject matter of

individual disciplines.

COMPUTER LITERACY: Computer literacy at

the college level means the ability to use

computer-based technology in communicating,

solving problems, and acquiring

information. Includes an understanding of the

limits, problems, and possibilities associated

with the use of technology, and development

of the tools necessary to evaluate and learn

new technologies as they become available.

SPEAKING: Competence in speaking is the ability

to communicate orally in clear, coherent,

and persuasive language appropriate to

purpose, occasion, and audience. Developing

this competency includes acquiring poise

and developing control of the language

through experience in making presentations

to small groups, to large groups, and

through the media.

LISTENING: Listening at the college level means

the ability to analyze and interpret various

forms of spoken communication.

MATHEMATICS: Applies mathematical techniques

to solve problems utilizing quantitative

and qualitative strategies. Applies quantitative

concepts, logic, and symbolic systems,

and mathematics techniques as required

in both discipline-specific and employment

situations. Demonstrates ability to understand

and apply the basics of quantitative

relationships and to recognize the logical

systems underlying them.

WRITING: 1) Produce prose that is clear,

grammatically correct and coherent, 2)

Adapt prose to the purpose, occasion and

audience, and 3) Employ steps in the writing

process including topic discovery and

development, organization, and audience

analysis and adaptation.

CRITICAL THINKING: Critical thinking embraces

methods for applying both qualitative and

quantitative skills analytically and creatively

to subject matter in order to evaluate arguments

and to construct alternative strategies.

Problem solving is one of the applications

of critical thinking, used to address an

identified task.

MULTICULTURAL COMPETENCIES: Demonstrates

knowledge of those elements and

processes that create and define culture.

Develops an understanding of the values,

practices, beliefs, and responsibilities of

living in a multicultural world. Develops

cross-cultural understanding, empathy, and

communication. Demonstrates an understanding

of diverse cultural expressions and

their influences on cross-cultural interactions.

Perspectives in the Core Curriculum

1. Establish broad and multiple perspectives of

the individual in relationship to the larger

society and world in which he or she lives,

and to understand the responsibilities of living

in a culturally and ethnically diversified

world;

2. Stimulate a capacity to discuss and reflect

upon individual, political, economic, and

social aspects of life in order to understand

ways in which to be a responsible member

of society;

3. Recognize the importance of maintaining

health and wellness;

4. Develop a capacity to use knowledge of how

technology and science affect their lives;

5. Develop personal values for ethical behavior;

6. Develop the ability to make aesthetic

judgments;

7. Use logical reasoning in problem solving;

and

8. Integrate knowledge and understand the

interrelationships of the scholarly disciplines.

GRADUATION

REQUIREMENTS

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

80 LSCS Catalog 2010/2011

Core Curriculum Exemplary

Objectives by Component Area

Communication:

• To understand and demonstrate writing

and speaking processes through invention,

organization, drafting, revision, editing,

and presentation.

• To understand the importance of specifying

audience and purpose and to select appropriate

communication choices.

• To understand and appropriately apply

modes of expression, i.e., description expositive,

narrative, scientific, and self-expressive,

in written, visual, and oral communication.

• To participate effectively in groups with

emphasis on listening, critical and reflective

thinking, and responding.

• To understand and apply basic principles

of critical thinking, problem solving and

technical proficiency in the development of

exposition and argument.

• To develop the ability to research and write

a documented paper and/or to give an oral

presentation.

Mathematics:

• To apply arithmetic, algebraic, geometric,

higher order thinking, and statistical methods

to modeling and solving real-world situations.

• To represent and evaluate basic mathematical

information verbally, numerically, graphically,

and symbolically.

• To expand mathematical reasoning skills

and formal logic to develop convincing

mathematical arguments.

• To use appropriate technology to enhance

mathematical thinking and understanding

and to solve mathematical problems and

judge the reasonableness of the results.

• To interpret mathematical models such as

formulas, graphs, tables and schematics,

and draw inferences from them.

• To recognize the limitations of mathematical

and statistical models.

• To develop the view that mathematics is an

evolving discipline, interrelated with human

culture, and understand its connections to

other disciplines.

Natural Sciences:

• To understand and apply methods and appropriate

technology to the study of natural

sciences.

• To recognize scientific and quantitative

methods and the differences between these

approaches and other methods of inquiry

and to communicate findings, analyses, and

interpretation both orally and in writing.

• To identify and recognize the differences

among competing scientific theories.

• To demonstrate knowledge of the major

issues and problems facing modern science,

including issues that touch upon ethics,

values, and public policies.

• To demonstrate knowledge of the interdependence

of science and technology and their

influence on, and contribution to, modern

culture.

Humanities, Visual & Performing Arts:

• To demonstrate awareness of the scope and

variety of works in the arts and humanities.

• To understand those works as expressions

of individual and human values within an

historical and social context.

• To respond critically to works in the arts and

humanities.

• To engage in the creative process or interpretive

performance and comprehend the

physical and intellectual demands required

of the author or visual or performing artist.

• To articulate an informed personal reaction

to works in the arts and humanities.

• To develop an appreciation for the aesthetic

principles that guide or govern the humanities

and arts.

• To demonstrate knowledge of the influence

of literature, philosophy, and/or the arts on

intercultural experiences.

GRADUATION

REQUIREMENTS

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

LSCS Catalog 2010/2011 81

Social/Behavioral Sciences:

• To employ the appropriate methods,

technologies, and data that social and

behavioral scientists use to investigate the

human condition.

• To examine social institutions and processes

across a range of historical periods, social

structures, and cultures.

• To use and critique alternative explanatory

systems or theories.

• To develop and communicate alternative

explanations or solutions for contemporary

social issues.

• To analyze the effects of historical, social,

political, economic, cultural, and global

forces on the area under study.

• To comprehend the origins and evolution

of U.S. and Texas political systems, with a

focus on the growth of political institutions,

the constitutions of the U.S. and Texas,

federalism, civil liberties, civil and human

rights.

• To understand the evolution and current role

of the U.S. in the world.

• To differentiate and analyze historical

evidence (documentary and statistical) and

differing points of view.

• To recognize and apply reasonable criteria

for the acceptability of historical evidence

and social research.

• To analyze, critically assess, and develop

creative solutions to public policy problems.

• To recognize and assume one’s responsibility

as a citizen in a democratic society by

learning to think for oneself, by engaging

in public discourse, and by obtaining

information through the news media and

other appropriate information sources about

politics and public policy.

• To identify and understand differences and

commonalities within diverse cultures.

Multicultural Competencies:

• Demonstrates knowledge of those elements

and processes that create and define culture.

• Develops an understanding of the values,

practices, beliefs, and responsibilities of

living in a multicultural world.

• Develops cross-cultural understanding, empathy,

and communication.

• Demonstrates an understanding of the

underlying unity of diverse cultural expressions

and their influences on cross-cultural

interactions.

Demonstration of Mastery

Each professor will select strategies and activities

throughout the course that foster the development

and mastery of the above educational skills

and competencies. Some strategies are book

reviews, article reviews, chapter reviews, writing

assignments, role playing, question groups,

role reversal, free association discussion, group

presentation, Socratic method, group projects,

individual projects, case studies, open-ended

essay exams, interviews, panel discussions, team

problem solving, group tests, organizing data,

group investigations, self assignments, discussion

leaders, team evaluations, and critical panels.

General Associate Degree

Requirements

Within five years of initial enrollment in credit

courses at LSCS, a student may graduate according

to the catalog degree requirements in effect

at the time of first enrollment or any subsequent

catalog degree requirements provided the degree,

the program, and requisite courses are

still being offered. Course prerequisite changes

need to be followed. If a student fails to complete

within five years all degree requirements of the

catalog in effect at the time of initial enrollment,

the student will be required to graduate under a

catalog not older than five years. The five year

initial enrollment period for specialized admissions

programs begins upon acceptance into the

program. Exception to this requirement may be

approved in extenuating circumstances by the

instructional vice president.

Students whose first year of enrollment in credit

courses is prior to fall 1993 may graduate according

to requirements in effect at that time

provided the degree, the program, and requisite

courses are still being offered.

1. At least 61 semester hours of earned credit,

18 of which must be courses taken at LSCS

GRADUATION

REQUIREMENTS

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

82 LSCS Catalog 2010/2011

and apply to the degree. Courses transferred

from regionally-accredited institutions will be

evaluated and applied to degree requirements

if:

a. At least a grade of “D” was earned.

b. The cumulative GPA of the transfer courses

applied to the degree or certificate must

be at least a 2.00.

c. AAS graduates may be required to

demonstrate skills/proficiencies in the

discipline.

2. Satisfaction of core competency requirements.

3. At least a 2.0 cumulative GPA for LSCS

courses applying toward their degree requirements.

4. A cumulative 2.0 GPA on all credit courses

earned at LSCS (graduation GPA).

5. Completion of LSCS Student Success Initiative

requirements (college level reading and

writing, and at least completion of Math

0308) even if students are exempt from the

Texas Success Initiative.

6. Completed formal application for graduation

in admissions office on or before the

announced deadline.

7. All transcripts on file and all financial obligations

to the college complete, including all

records cleared in the library.

Associate of Applied

Science Degree

The associate of applied science degree is issued

to students who complete a college-level careereducation

curriculum. This degree is designed

to prepare students for employment in a specific

career. It is issued to students who successfully

fulfill the general requirements, in addition to

the specific technical or workforce curriculum

for each program and the general education

core requirements listed below.

Requirements

The general education block for each program

must contain a minimum of 15 college credit

hours.

1. The general education block for each program

must include ENGL 1301.

2. The general education block for each program

must contain at least one course from

each of the following categories:

• Math/Natural Sciences

• Social/Behavioral Sciences

• Humanities/Fine Arts

• General Education Core Requirement

3. Furthermore, graduates must meet

the computer literacy, math (minimum

completion of Math 0308 plus any math

degree requirements), oral communication

competencies, wellness, and multicultural

requirements.

Earning Additional Associate

Degrees

A student who has received an associate degree

from LSCS or any other regionally-accredited

institution of higher education may obtain an

additional associate degree in another area.

However, students should seek appropriate

academic advising before initiating the pursuit

of another associate degree.

This provision is subject to the following stipulations:

1. For each additional associate degree, a

minimum of 18 semester credit hours must be

completed at LSCS. These credit hours may

not repeat credit applied to a previous degree

and must apply to the additional degree.

2. All courses required by any specific program

must be completed.

Certificate Programs and

General Requirements

Certificates are awarded upon the completion

of specific courses which have been industryvalidated

and sequenced for the purpose of developing

and upgrading skills in an occupation.

The programs vary in length and are designed

to prepare the student for employment. Students

will receive their certificate from the LSCS College

authorized to offer the total certificate program at

which he/she has completed the greatest number

of technical program credit hours applicable

to the degree or certificate. To be awarded a

certificate from LSCS, a student must:

GRADUATION

REQUIREMENTS

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

LSCS Catalog 2010/2011 83

1. Fulfill all the course requirements for a

certificate program, completing at least 50

percent of coursework at LSCS.

2. Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.00

in all courses required for the certificate.

3. APPLY FOR GRADUATION before a certificate

can be awarded.

If pursuing an Enhanced Skills Certificate, students

must complete the related LSCS associate’s

degree prior to enrollment.

Students desiring an Advanced Technical

Certificate must complete a related associate’s

or bachelor’s degree prior to enrollment.

All associate degrees and certificates over 42

credit hours require completion of Math 0308

or higher and college level reading and writing

or higher based on degree requirements.

Graduation

Students will be awarded a LSCS diploma when

they graduate from one of the five LSCS colleges

in accordance with the following criteria:

Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science

(AS) Degrees – Students will graduate

from the LSCS College where he/she has

completed the greatest number of credit

hours applicable to the degree.

Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree and

Certificates – Students will graduate from the

LSCS College authorized to offer the total

degree program or certificate at which he/

she has completed the greatest number of

technical program credit hours applicable

to the degree or certificate. Nursing students

will graduate from the college where they

successfully complete the capstone course

for the program.

Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) – Students

will graduate from the LSCS College authorized

to offer the total degree program or

certificate at which he/she has completed

the greatest number of program credit hours

applicable to the degree or certificate.

Annual commencement exercises are held at

the close of the spring semester. Students who

complete all degree or certificate requirements

or who are candidates for graduation are invited

to participate in the college commencement

exercise. An application for graduation should

be submitted prior to the semester that all course

work is completed.

AA, AS, AAT Transferability

Requirements for a baccalaureate degree in any

given major are set by the university granting

that degree. Students who wish to receive an associate

of arts degree or an associate of science

degree from LSCS must incorporate the degree

requirements previously listed with those of the

college/university of their choice. To minimize

problems with transferability of courses, students

should make their choice of a college or university

as soon as possible and obtain a catalog from

that institution. A faculty advisor or counselor

should be consulted and a degree plan developed

to ensure progress toward the student’s

educational goal. A student who enrolls in 30

or more credit hours above the baccalaureate

degree plan may have to pay out-of-state tuition

rates for the excess hours.

Reverse transfer establishes policies and procedures

for credits earned at universities to be

transferred to LSCS and applied toward associate

degrees.

For additional information, go to our Web site

at LoneStar.edu/joint-admissions or contact the

articulation and university relations department

at LSC-University Center at Montgomery at

936.273.7606.


Academic Transfer

ACADEMIC

TRANSFER

LSCS Catalog 2010/2011 85

A course cannot count toward more than one requirement of the degree with one exception

– the multicultural requirement.

Core Component C ourse Options S emester credit hours

Communicat ion ENGL 1301 and 1302 and 3 hours of Speech: SPCH 1144, 1145, 9 hours

1311, 1315, 1318, 1321, 2144, 2145

Mat hemat ics MATH 1314, 1316, 1324, 1325, 1332, 1342, *1350, *1351, 2318, 3 hours

2320, †2412, †2413, †2414, †2415

Nat ural Sciences BIOL 1406 OR 1408, 1407 OR 1409, 2401, 2402, 2404, 2406, 8 hours

2416, 2420, 2421; CHEM 1405, 1411, 1412, 1419, 2423, 2425;

ENVR 1401, 1402; GEOL 1403,1404, 1405, 2307;

PHYS 1401, 1402, 1403, 1404, 1410, 2425, 2426

Visual & ARTS 1301, 1303, 1304, 1316, 2346, 2356; DANC 2303; 3 hours

Performing Arts DRAM 1120, 1121, 1310, 1330, 1351, 1352, 2120, 2331,

2361, 2362, 2366; MUSI 1301, 1306, 1308, 1309, 1310

Humanities ENGL 2307, 2322, 2323, 2327, 2328, 2332, 2333, 2341, 2342, 3 hours

2343, 2351; HUMA 1301, 1302; PHIL 1301, 1304, 2306, 2321;

SPCH 2341; FREN 2311, 2312; GERM 2311, 2312; ITAL 2311, 2312;

SPAN 2311, 2312, 2313, 2315

Social/Behav ioral HIST 1301, 1302, or 2301 (select 6 hours with 3 hours in U. S. History) 6 hours

Sciences

GOVT 2301 and 2302 6 hours

ANTH 2301, 2346, 2351; CRIJ 1301, 1307; ECON 2301, 2302; 3 hours

GEOG 1300, 1303; GOVT 2304; HIST 2311, 2312, 2321, 2322;

PSYC 2301, 2306, 2308; SOCI 1301, 1306, 2301, 2319, 2326

Kinesiology Select any activity course 1111-2184 excluding 3 credit-hour KINE classes 1 hour

Multicultural Students must take one of the above underlined courses or one of the

REQUIREMENT following to meet the multicultural requirement of this degree:

FREN 1300, 1310, 1411, 1412; GERM 1411, 1412; ITAL 1411, 1412;

JAPN 1411, 1412; SGNL 1401, 1402, 2301, 2302; SPAN 1300, 1310,

1411, 1412, 2306

TOTAL 42 hours

* Specifically designed for elementary and middle school teachers.

† This course satisfies the mathematics core requirement of three semester hours; however, the fourth hour is not a

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