Методическое пособие по курсу делового английского языка для студентов II курса




НазваниеМетодическое пособие по курсу делового английского языка для студентов II курса
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5. Keep your full attention on the person you are negotiating with. Listen and watch for all verbal and behavioral cues that will give you a better idea of the real needs, values and aspirations of the other party.
6. Be comfortable with silence. In a negotiation situation, the person who has the least tolerance of silence will fill the void by speaking – often with a concession.
7. Never downplay your strengths or over emphasize your weaknesses. Be amicable, but firm. In higher level positions, especially, the most appealing candidates have a pleasant air of invincibility about them.
8. Do not put pressure on yourself to make a decision or grant concessions on the spot. If they tell you the offer is final, say that you'll need a day or so to think about it.
9. Negotiate for the future as well as the present. If you are told the salary isn't flexible, perhaps another area is. See if you can increase the total value of your compensation package through benefits such as deferred compensation, relocation assistance, vacation time, stock options, club membership, commissions or a company car. (As a rule of thumb, benefits are worth 25 to 30 percent of the cited salary.)
10. Be sure. Never say "no" or turn down an offer until you are absolutely certain you must do so.

How you negotiate your salary shows the employer how you will do business and negotiate on the company's behalf once you are hired. The key is to do it in a way that gains you not only a higher salary, but also the employer's trust and respect.


Article 6 – Keys to following up after an interview


A thank-you note shows your courteousness, savvy, and interest in the job. Here are some key things to keep in mind when writing one to help bolster your candidacy.


Giving thanks

Interviewers like to be thanked, and a thank-you note shows consideration and allows you to confirm your interest. Nevertheless, how you go about writing the thank-you – what you say, how you say it, and who you say it to – could make or break your candidacy.


In fact, if you are not careful, you botch a thank you and lose a job you want. Recruiters say that ill-considered thank-you notes can kill your candidacy, especially if they have typos – and many do. Proofread your thank you.


And if you have talked to multiple people, you do not want to send them all the same thank you – interviewers regularly assemble all documents, including thank-you notes, before making a hiring decision. If the four you sent were identical, that is not going to look good when the recruiters hang them on the wall and compare. If you individualize your sentiments, you will make a much better impression.


Don´t push it

Another gaffe: appearing pushy. Remember, you haven´t received an offer yet. Give your recruiters some time to make a decision. Letting them know you expect an offer, and quickly, will help them narrow down the list – by taking you off.


Finally, think about the best form for your thank you. If the interview tells you she plans to make a decision that night, do not send a letter by snail mail – e-mail promptly, as soon as you get home; otherwise, the decision will have been made long before your letter arrived. On the other hand, if you are applying somewhere that prides itself on doing personalized work for clients, you might want to send off a handwritten message on a nice card. That shows an attention to detail that will be important on the job.


You might also considering faxing your thank you and putting the hard-copy in the mail. By faxing, the interviewer gets your sentiments immediately; and then again when the hard copy arrives. You will get your name before the person twice with the same thank you – which will help keep you on the interviewer´s mind.


Even if you do not want the job, it is worth letting your interviewer know that you appreciate their time and consideration. Who knows, they could be interviewing you again one day – and for a position you will want.


You should also realize that an impeccably written and individually tailored letter will make your interviewer feel warm and fuzzy inside, but it probably will not sway the unsentimental recruiter who has already decided you are not right for the position. What it will do is leave a good impression if you decide to apply to the company again – or give you an advantage if whomever the company does hire does not work out.


The bottom line in following up is that you should do it – graciously, promptly, and carefully.


Article 7 – 6 secrets of successful entrepreneurs


Every day, brave men and women set out to start their own businesses with the hopes of turning a passion into a successful career. However, not every start-up business succeeds. Although successful entrepreneurs come in all shapes and sizes and their businesses are as varied as their owners, there are some secrets that these successful businesspeople share when it comes to getting a business off the ground. The following are six secrets to becoming a successful entrepreneur.

Secret 1 - The most important work happens before the business is started. The first thing that successful entrepreneurs do before setting up their business is extensive research to make sure they understand the market, the competition, and what needs they can meet. These individuals know that they cannot effectively provide a service without knowing what challenges they are up against and what opportunities they have to succeed. Good entrepreneurs do their homework. They create business plans, set goals, and lay all the necessary groundwork before taking the plunge.

Secret 2 - You can make money by working for free. Many entrepreneurs got their businesses of the ground by taking on volunteer projects in their communities. Doing this gave them the opportunity to add to their portfolios, make connections, and begin the all-important networking process. Susan Keuhnhold, who owns a graphic design firm in Indianapolis, got her business started by volunteering to do design projects for her children's school and other organizations with which she was involved. "I would go to a meeting, hear about a need and speak up to let them know what I could do," she said. "I completed a couple of great volunteer projects and eventually more and more people who were in need of graphic design learned about my services. Soon I had developed a base of clients, many of which I still have today."

Secret 3 - A good opportunity can come up at any place and any time. Sometimes opportunities present themselves when we least expect them. Successful entrepreneurs learn to keep their eyes and ears open for these opportunities at all times. "You never know where business will come from," said Raquel Richardson, who runs her own marketing company. "The key is to always be planting seeds. You never know what is going to grow, but the more you put out there, the better chance you have of something great popping up." This means being ready to talk about your business anytime and in any place. The secret is to keep yourself tuned to potential opportunities and not be afraid to sell yourself when they arise.

Secret 4 - Small business can lead to big business. Sometimes business owners spend all their time looking for the big fish and ignoring smaller opportunities. Robyn Frankel owns a public relations firm in St. Louis and has learned that clients with minimal work to start can turn into big opportunities.

"It is much easier to grow relationships than to start new ones," she said. Therefore, she takes on projects even when they are small, completes those projects with flair, and then proactively works to turn those little opportunities into big ones.

Secret 5 - Passion is important. It's no secret that becoming a successful entrepreneur is hard work. Business owners tend to put in long hours when they are starting out, and often find themselves working on their business - or at least thinking about the business - all the time. That's why it is vital to love what you are doing. Richardson said she puts more time into her business than she did when she worked for an agency, but she doesn't mind because she truly enjoys her work. Other successful entrepreneurs agree. Starting your own business is a challenge, but it is well worth it if you have the opportunity to fulfill your career dreams on a daily basis.

Secret 6 - Personal networking is the best kind of marketing. Entrepreneurs agree that the best kind of marketing is not paid advertising, but personal connections. "You can spend money advertising or developing marketing materials, but you get much more bang for your buck just by networking," said Keuhnhold. This means participating in community organizations, joining local business groups, and attending events to meet new people. Robyn Frankel says some of her best opportunities have come from being on the boards of local non-profit organizations. "I try to be as active as possible in boards and committees, and this has led to much of the work I am still doing today," she said.


Article 8 – Bad communicator, bad boss


Funny how many bosses think their subordinates are moving on because of dissatisfaction over what they are paid. Wrong.


A 2001 study involving some 20,000 exit interviews found that No.1 reason people leave jobs is “poor supervisory behaviour”. In other words, bad bosses.

And one of the biggest factors cited was poor communication skills. People too often are promoted for their workplace accomplishments, without any assessment of their communication skills.

Fortunately, good communicators are made, not born.

Some management and human resources experts have been questioned recently about how well today´s managagers communicate, including their use e-mail. When asked what bosses generally need to work on, here is what they said.


6 basic communication tips


1. Be a better listener. Pay attention to your employees. Sounds simple, but it is a common gripe, says one of a human resources consultants. She offers a story about one of her former bosses, who cleverly perched his hand under his chin and appeared in meetings to be listening intently to whoever was speaking. But if you looked closely, under his glasses, his eyes were closed. He would use the meeting to snooze.


2. Make time for employees. Regular, one-on-one meetings with your team members are important; if employees work remotely, meet by phone. If you can´t meet weekly, do it at least twice a month. And don´t take phone calls during meetings, unless it is an emergency. Show your employees they have your full attention. Talk about their career paths and how you envision them growing in their jobs. On the flip side, employees need to be aware of bosses´ time pressures.


3. Put out a consistent message about your values. Knowing who you are, and what you stand for, can help your employees make better decisions on their own (or at least decisions that you will like better).


4. Give regular feedback; avoid surprises. Employees shouldn´t first learn about significant performance issues in an annual evaluation. They should be confronted well beforehand (and as humanely as possible) that there is something they need to improve.


5. Be effective in speaking to groups. If you can´t speak well at employee meetings or in front of employee groups, you lose credibility as a manager. Learn how to do it; learn how to get better at it. The same thing goes for writing e-mails.


6. Don´t hide behind e-mails. Most delicate matters must be discussed in person. Most conflicts must be settled in person, or at least by phone. When emotions are involved, e-mail becomes a less-appropriate vehicle to communicate. And e-mail is never an appropriate method to tell someone he or she is being laid off.


Getting your own evaluation


Should you seek out feedback from employees on your performance as a manager? You bet. It will engender loyalty, and likely make you a better boss.

How do you solicit such feedback? Larger businesses, such as Microsoft, have annual manager feedback forms that can be answered by employees (anonymously, if they so choose).

Use your one-on-one meetings with an employee to hear him or her out on an issue concerning your management style. Try to disarm the employee as much as possible, with humor or whatever, and be sincere in your interest about what he or she has to say. It may be hard for you to do, but it may even be harder for the employee to speak his or her mind. The end result is likely to be a better relationship.


Acting on employee feedback


How to handle an employee´s criticism? You listen to what the employee has to say, ask questions where appropriate, get the employee´s suggestions on how you could improve and then pledge to consider it.

You are likely not to agree with everything said, at least initially. But take it all under advisement. Your initial reaction migjht be to reject the feedback completely. Bad move. Tell him you will take some time to think about the criticism, and get back to him later. Then do so.

Chances are, you will appreciate what the employee had to say, even if – after spending some time thinking about it – you still disagree. Do get back to the employee and pledge to do what you feel is necessary to enhance the relationship.


EXERCISES

Read the articles and translate sentences from Russian into English using words and expressions from them.


Article 1


1. When you come to the interview, you must be well groomed and your clothes must be clean and neat.

2. If you want to make your dream come true, you must be persistent.

3. It is a very challenging task.

4. Have you determined your goals yet?

5. Your CV must convey your strengths and experience.

6. The boss wants me to inform him about my accomplishments and results of work.

7. Take an inventory of the tasks you want to accomplish.

8. During the interview do not forget to highlight your abilities and achievements.

9. Due to her bright appearance she always stands out in a crowd.


Article 2


1. She is considered to be a conceited and arrogant person.

2. It is a challenging task to get ahead in your career without self-promotion.

3. You have worked hard and deserve a promotion.

4. Though he conveyed the benefits of his product, he could not convince me that it was worth buying.

5. I have prepared a mini pitch and will talk as succinctly as possible.

6. The main complaint of the employer was a lack of experience of the candidates who were vying for that position.


Article 3


1. You must answer examination questions with precision and confidence.

2. He looked subdued and his handshake was timid and limp. Everything showed a lack of confidence.

3. Pay attention to your posture. Do not slouch.

4. He was listening carefully nodding and tilting his head.

5. It can be distracting if you often change position.


Article 4


1. We should cut down the amount of money we spend on food every month.

2. He made the list of all pros and cons and thought carefully before he accepted the job. So it was not a rash decision.

3. Though the job offer was very tempting , he took some time to response.

4. He has a good salary, different benefits and good relationship with his coworkers.

5. Why did you reject this job offer? – I turned it down because this job involves big responsibility.


Article 5


1. You should negotiate with your boss a higher salary. You deserve it. Your present salary is not reasonable.

2. We are not going to grant them any concessions.

3. Do not downplay your strenghts. Never speak about your weaknesses.

Article 6


1. A thank-you letter will show your courteousness and savvy.

2. Will you bolster my candidacy?

3. You should show your consideration and congratulate him on his birthday.

4. What you said was ill-considered.

5. This gaffe can spoil everything.

6. I cannot accept a fax-copy, I need a hard-copy.

7. What is the bottom line of your work?


Article 7


1. He is a successful entrepreneur now because before he started his own business he had made an extensive research of the market.

2. What kind of services do you provide?

3. It was very difficult for me to make a decision and take the plunge.

4. They spend a lot of money advertising their company.


Article 8


1. He was promoted due to his big work accomplishments.

2. I am very tired. I would like to snooze a bit.

3. You can call this number only in emergency.

4. I could not foresee the consequences of this action.
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