Методическое пособие по курсу делового английского языка для студентов II курса




НазваниеМетодическое пособие по курсу делового английского языка для студентов II курса
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Article 1 – How to find the first job after college


Congratulations! You have finally made it through four years of college and are ready to enter the “real world”. Now the next big step comes – finding your first full-time job. For some, this task can be more challenging than any final exam, but with the right tools and planning, finding your first job is a manageable feat. The following are some steps to take to help you get you moving on the right path.

Step 1 – Determine your goals.

Even after several years of college, you may still be unsure about the type of job you would like or what opportunities are available to you. Take an inventory of your strengths, weaknesses, likes and dislikes to figure out what kind of job suits you. Do you want to work with people? Are you more adept to being active rather than sitting at a desk? Do you thrive on high-pressure situations? Once you have answered these questions, research the jobs that fit your talents and personality. You can find reference books at bookstores and libraries that outline careers for different majors or interview professionals to learn more about their careers. Learning about your options now will help you develop a focused game plan.

Step 2 – Get your tools in order.

It is important to have the right tools for any task you take on. The tools needed for a job search are a strong resume and cover letter which must convey your strengths and experience clearly. While there are scores of resources available to help you develop these tools, here are few tips to remember:

  • Think about the type of resume you need. A functional resume, which highlights your abilities rather than your work history, might be the best choice for first-time job seekers.

  • Write your resume to focus on accomplishments and results you have achieved, rather than simple descriptions of past experiences.

  • Remember that not all experience comes from full-time work. Do not forget about your volunteer experience, school activities and part-time positions.

  • Make sure when you have the correct contact information at any company you are targeting. Most hiring managers are turned off by greetings like “To Whom it May Concern”.

  • Write your cover letter and resume to speak directly to each company you target and the position you are seeking.

Step 3 – Utilize your contacts.

It is often not what you know, but who you know. Tap into any resources you have, such as family, friends and former employers.Use any and all contacts you can find. Something all you need is a name and a good reference to get your foot in the door.

Step 4 – Be persistent.

When it comes to finding the first job, the sqeaky wheel gets the oil. Send your resumes to your targeted companies, but do not let your work stop there. Always follow up with a phone call, more than one if you need to. Be proactive and suggest times to meet with potential employers. Ask for informational interviews if there are no positions open at a company.

Step 5 – Be professional.

It can be difficult to make the transition from college life to the professional environment, but those who do fare much better. Wear a conservative business suit and be well groomed when you are going on the interview. Follow up all meetings with personal thank you letters.Practice answering tough questions. The more you can do to make a good impression, the better chance you will have of standing out in a crowd.


Article 2 – Why self-promotion is the key to success


Self-promotion is a crucial element to your success in finding a job, moving up to a better one and negotiating a raise.

Many negative connotations typically come to mind when thinking about self-promotion, all of which unfortunately keep most people, especially women, from feeling comfortable and confident when talking about themselves. You know all of the immature favorites: conceited, show-off, braggart, arrogant, egotistical. Nobody wants to fall victim to such name-calling.

Yet if you are not comfortable claiming your achievements and promoting yourself, it will be difficult, if not impossible, to get ahead in your career.

Women often talk about their responsibilities rather than their achievements. They will rehash their previous job descriptions instead of boasting about their accomplishments. They do this in their resumes, cover letters, conversations and interviews, which often holds them back from getting the job, raise or promotion they deserve.

Knowing what your achievements are will enable you to seize opportunities to set yourself apart from the competition. Remember that job searching is all about sales: the product you are selling is you! If you are unable to convey the “product” benefits, it is more challenging to convince a potential buyer to go for it!

Once you know what you are selling – and why it is such a special product – practice saying it over and over. Practice writing it too. When you are in interview situations you will want to be able to smartly and succinctly convey your greatest strengths. Many otherwise smart people blow great opportunities because they are unprepared when meeting someone new. One way to never be caught of guard is to be prepared with a mini pitch about yourself. The more you say it and the more you practice it, the more confident you will feel about delivering.

Beyond that, when promoting yourself to new contacts and asking them for help in your job search, you should be as specific as possible with your request.

One of the biggest complaints recruiters have about jobseekers is a lack of a focus. This is especially true in an economic climate that has seen longer periods of unemployment than any of us would want. As the bills pile up and the frustration grows, jobseekers find themselves more desperate. That leads to the “I will take anything – just give me a job” approach, which is a huge turn-off to potential employers.

When there are many highly qualified candidates vying for the same positions, it often comes down to attitude. The candidate with the best outlook, the most positive personality and the more passion for the position usually gets the job. Your self-promotion should never include any negatives. Keep all professional conversations positive.

The last and perhaps most important issue to realize is that you have earned the right to celebrate your accomplishments. Many times when something great happens to us we can not believe it and we wind up questioning ourselves as to whether or not we deserve it. So – be proud of yourself and your accomplishments. You have earned it.


Article 3 – Actions speak louder than words


Dos and Don´ts of Interview Body Language


In an interview, it is not always just what you say that is important, but also how you say it and how you look when you are saying it. Despite answering all questions precisely and with confidence, if your body language is weak, your overall image may be perceived in this way, too. In order to make sure your physical actions and gestures are conveying the right message, here are a few dos and don´ts to keep in mind. While they alone will not win you the big job, they can certainly help or hurt your chances in a pinch.


Do enter the room confidently. When you meet your interviewer for the first time, hold your head up, put on a smile, and be sure you look like you are enthusiastic about the opportunity. Interviews are not fun, but if you go into it anticipating torture, your body language will reflect this attitude.


Don´t shake hands like a dead fish. In any professional environment, a handshake can say a lot about a person. Make sure your handshake is firm, not timid and limp. In the same respect, do not overdo it. You certainly do not want to be remembered as someone who broke the interviewer´s fingers!


Do try to mirrow your interviewer. Mirroring the body position of the person you are talking to is a natural tendency, and this strategy often results in a more relaxed atmosphere. Pay attention to your interviewer and try to mirror his or her attitude and actions in a subtle way. This does not mean, however, doing everything your interviewer does. You want the environment to be comfortable – not creepy.


Don´t swing your legs, tap your feet, twirl your hair, wring your hands, or bite your fingernails. All these actions demonstrate lack of confidence and fear and can be extremely distracting. You want to make sure your interviewer concentrate on your great answers, not your fidgety behaviour.


Do pay attention to your posture. It sounds elementary, but sitting up straight and having good posture will tell your interviewer that you are confident and have a strong personality, while slouching will paint you as lazy and weak.


Don´t cross your arms in front your body. Sitting with arms crossed in front of you indicates defensiveness, resistence, aggressiveness or a closed mind. Use your hands to be expressive when you are talking. When the interviewer is speaking, keep your hands folded in your lap or rested on the arms of your chair.


Do make and keep eye contact. Failing to make eye contact with your interviewer will keep you from truly connecting with him or her, and might make you seem shy or even evasive. Yes, making eye contact may be uncomfortable, but it is an important tactic. Similarly, try to utilize other body expressions that demonstrate interest, such as nodding, tilting your head, or raising your eyebrows when the other person is making a point.


Don´t change position very often. Constant shifting is distracting and can make a candidate seem untrustworthy. Resting your ankle on your knee will come across as too casual and overconfident.


Do pay attention to your tone of voice which says a lot about you, too. Be sure to answer questions in a strong, confident tone. Avoid talking too softly, mumbling or speaking too quickly. A good thing to remember before answering a question is to take a deep breath, think for a second, and then begin to answer. This will help you calm your nerves and will give you the opportunity to “look before you leap” when it comes to your important answers.


Article 4 – Deciding between two job offers


What happens when two job offers come in at the same time? There are worse problems to have, but a dilemma nevertheless. This seemingly attractive situation usually becomes a very difficult decision to make especially if the companies involved have impressed you. The trick to determining which offer is best for you is cutting down the amount of emotion that is going into your decision and thinking through your options logically and methodically. Think over these tips before making your decision.

1. Ask for more time to give a response.
At most companies, the world will not come to an end if you wait a few more days to come on board. Companies sometimes pressure candidates to make acceptance decisions, but any company worth your time will be willing to give you a few more days to carefully think through your options. In fact, the company should be impressed by the fact that you are responsible enough to take accepting a job seriously.
2. Make some lists.
One of the best ways to think through a difficult situation is by putting your thoughts down on paper. First, make a list of what you really want to get out of your job and what factors are important to you. Next, create another list of the pros and cons of each company. Give yourself ample time to complete this step and think long and hard about each list. This will help you make an informed decision rather than a rash one.
3. Remember that it's not just about the money.
While it might be tempting to simply go with the offer that includes a higher salary, there are a wide variety of factors that will go into your future career happiness. Make sure you also consider your potential coworkers, the leadership of the company, other benefits, and the career path and opportunities available to you. You may receive one offer that comes with a substantially higher salary, but not as much opportunity to move ahead.

4. Pick someone's brain.
If you have the opportunity, speak to employees at both companies, as well as others in your community. Find out whatever you can about each company's reputation and direction. Doing this will also give you an idea of personalities at work at both companies. Do the employees seem happy? Are they enthusiastic and willing to give their employer a positive recommendation? You can often tell a great deal about how people really feel just by their immediate reactions. If you ask current employees how they like the company and hear hesitation prior to positive responses, you may be receiving an important red flag to consider.
5. Don't burn your bridges.
Once you have decided on one job offer, make sure you reject the other offer professionally. Write a formal thank you letter after you have turned down the offer explaining that you were impressed with the company and its employees, but simply felt you needed to move in a different direction. Try to keep in touch with the company and contacts you made. You never know when your situation will change, and it is always a good idea to maintain networking contacts throughout your career.
Remember, in any professional situation, how you react today can have a major effect on your success tomorrow. If you consider all of your options, think carefully about your opportunities, and are respectful of the companies involved, you will make the right decision, regardless of where you end up on the first day of work!


Article 5 – 10 tricks for negotiating a higher starting salary


In one corner: the prospective employer, who wants to hire you at the lowest reasonable salary. In the other corner: you, wanting to be hired at the highest reasonable salary. In between is the negotiable area, which, according to HR managers we spoke to, ranges anywhere from 10 to 30 percent.Should you bother to negotiate? Absolutely!
"The level of salary is a predictor of the level of responsibility you will have within the company," says Human Resources expert Lori Kocon. "And since future salaries, salary increases and bonuses are based on this one, an increase of just $1,000 in the negotiated salary may represent $15,000 to $30,000 over the next ten to fifteen years.
"Most employers are not trying to exploit you and will not take offense as long as you approach the negotiation with professionalism, tact and goodwill," Kocon adds.


Here are ten ways to do just that:

1. Dress and act the part. Remember going into the interview that much of your negotiation is already non-verbally transacted by your image and bearing.
2. Be patient. Wait until after the job has been firmly offered to discuss or negotiate pay.
3. Research the normal salary range for this type of position. If you have close contacts at the hiring company, they may be able to provide you with the actual salary guidelines for the job grade or position. Otherwise, you can find out what other companies are paying individuals with your skills and education by checking out third party salary research.
4. Don't be the first to give a definitive figure. Ask for the range of salary for this position before offering any figure you have in mind. (In some cases, the manager may have discretionary power to go 20 percent above the highest figure he or she mentions to get an exceptional candidate.)
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