For this assignment, I chose to focus on the journalism collection in the academic library at Cayuga Community College in Auburn, N. Y. Cayuga Community College




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Beth Beer Cuddy

IST 613

Assignment I

For this assignment, I chose to focus on the journalism collection in the academic library at Cayuga Community College in Auburn, N.Y. Cayuga Community College is a two-year college with its main campus located in Auburn and a satellite campus located in Fulton, N.Y. The Norman F. Burke Memorial Library on the Auburn campus and the Learning Commons in Fulton both serve the college’s 3,842 students in addition to faculty, other students in the SUNY system and the residents of Cayuga and Oswego counties (http:www.cayuga-cc.edu/, 2005).

The library’s collection falls between the Library of Congress’s call number range of 4700 to 4800, and contains a little over 250 selections of books, periodicals, electronic databases and videos. The materials cover various aspects of the industry, including philosophy and history; how-tos (writing, editing, reporting, researching, interviewing); media criticism and theory; biography; anthologies and media institutions. I entered each title along with its author, call number and year of publication into an Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, and discovered approximately 70 percent of the collection was published in 1989 or earlier. Only 8 percent of the selections were published in this decade. The library’s reference section contained no selections in journalism although the library has a strong selection of electronic databases such as Lexis/Nexis and Opposing Viewpoints. I chose to focus my collection development efforts on updating older editions of newswriting guides, adding recent biographies and books about media institutions, selecting new DVDs and videos, and expanding its collection of media criticism to take into account the vast changes in the mass media since the 1980s. I also sought to add monographs from small presses and to create a reference section on journalism.


A. Collection Development

The field of journalism has changed drastically in the last few decades with the advent of the 24-hour-a-day, seven-days-a-week news cycle, cable news, talk radio and the Internet. It has lost a good portion of the public’s trust and is lambasted by both the right and left for being the tool for the opposing side. According to a recent poll by the Annenberg Public Policy Center, 65 percent of respondents thought that most news organizations would ignore or cover up their mistakes (Posner, 2005). A strong journalism collection would reflect the changes in the industry and the topics of criticism, and give budding journalists the tools to write and report effectively.

Many of the collection’s guides on newswriting and books about the industry were written before the vast transformations. The library contained few selections on how to write for the digital age and how the 24-hour-seven-day-a-week news cycle has impacted the profession. I felt that was a critical gap to fill considering the findings of a 1998 study concluded that 90 percent of journalists writing for U.S. newspapers were using computers to find and analyze information (Garrison, 2001). The small collection of videos, which mainly centered on educational videos on how media institutions worked, were produced in the 1980s and would not address the sweeping technological changes that have taken place since then. Only one work in the biography collection was published in this decade, and many reflected the contributions and lives of white men.

To select materials, I consulted Bowker’s Books in Prints to search and find reviews for journalism books. I also visited the Web site for The Poynter Institute, which contained bibliographies for various journalism topics like broadcast journalism, new media, investigative reporting and ethics. The institute is well known for its efforts to improve the quality of journalism by providing workshops, coaching, and resources to media institutions (Martin, 1990). I found a list of small independent book publishers by re-reading Anderson’s article (Anderson, 2000), and using the site www.newpages.com to find a directory of small press publishers. I visited different publishers’ Web sites and searched for journalism and media books. I also used the resource www.bookwire.com, which directed me to sites for Focal Press and the bookstore for the Journalism Education Association. In addition, I looked at the online catalogs for three top journalism schools: Northwestern University, Syracuse University and Columbia University.

Although Books in Print provided a number of reviews, I decide to consult the database Information Science & Technology Abstracts which indexed such periodicals as Library Journal, Publishers Weekly, Choice, Columbia Journalism Review, American Journalism Review, Booklist, Newspaper Research Journal, Journalism History, Nieman Reports, among other journals. Here I found a treasure trove of book reviews that helped guide in the process of choosing the appropriate works for first- and second-year communication students, and the public at large.

Journalism History & Philosophy ($285.15)

I chose to add 11 works under this category. The topics include the history of investigative journalism, the arrival of television and Internet reporting, the influence of sex and tabloid news, and the coverage of lesbian and gays in the media and of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

A seminal work in this category was Elements of Journalism, written by Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel, “arguably the two most prominent media critics in America” (Welch, 2002). The book presents the challenges of the past and relates them to the current concerns about today’s media. One reviewer stated it was a useful book to give to anyone who has never had an introduction to the ideas of journalism and “for those who have somehow been cloistered from the news media, like college students” (Claussen, 2001). The Creation of the Media: Political Originations of Modern Communication by Paul Starr was described as a “landmark study” and “thought-provoking work” (Bernt, 2005) where many “will find much to learn in this valuable book as we consider actions that will re-shape the media” (Snyder, 2004). John Pilger’s work Tell Me No Lies will invigorate readers by reminding them that investigative journalism “is a trade practiced, and practiced well” (Boylan, 2005). The assassination of President John F. Kennedy marked the turning point when Americans began to turn to television for their news and When the News Went Live makes that event come alive again (Publishers Weekly, 2004). Covering Catastrophe, which documents how broadcast journalists covered the terrorist attacks, “illustrates the dedication and professionalism of journalists at a crucial moment in American history” (Solberg, 2002).


Journalism How-Tos ($1,591.16)

I added the most to this category since many of the guides included in the library’s collection were published in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. I added a number of works that would guide a writer in the field of electronic media. For example, Pavlik’s Journalism and New Media discusses the latest electronic technologies and their impact on journalism. “Few books compare in detail, quality, and documentation” (Weiler, 2001). Digital Dilemmas looks at ethical issues journalists face in the online world. “The book examines issues of privacy, speech, intellectual property, copyright, and the not-so-solid wall between advertising and editorial interests, all aimed at understanding digital ethics” (Henderson, 2005). Schlein’s Find it Online teaches journalists how to navigate the Web and where to find pertinent sources. “Since its first publication in 1994, this guide has been an essential tool for journalists” (Giles, 2002). I also included guides that incorporated the latest technology in broadcast and radio journalism.

The other selections included guides on interviewing such as The Interviewer’s Handbook by John Brady, who “knows more about the art of interviewing than anyone on the planet” (Leddy, 2004), and guides on reporting, editing and writing like Inside the Writer’s Mind by Stephen Bloom who lets the reader get inside his head and soak up his wisdom and experience (Weinberg, 2003). Writing to Deadline offers invaluable advice to the budding journalists from Donald Murray, who is an “authoritative voice in the matter” (Roth, 2004).

Media Criticism & Theory ($622.24)

I added 25 works to enhance the library’s small collection of media criticism, which numbered around 10. The additions covered such topics as censorship, corporate control of media, the role of race, the downsizing of staff and the decline in reporting, the influence of government and pundits, the state of the media after 9/11, and media bias. The works covered the range of the political spectrum from William McGowan’s Coloring the News, which illustrates the “corruption of reporting in favor of ‘diversity’” (Water, 2002) to Norman Solomon and Jeff Cohen’s The Wizards of Media Oz, which “demolishes the myth that liberalism dominates the media” (Ireland, 1997).

A number of the works center on stories the media declined to cover and others where the media went overboard. Kristen Borjesson’s Into the Buzzsaw looks at the pressures reporters face when attempting to publish a story that is not looked upon favorably by owners. “There is also enough to send conscientious journalists or journalism scholars scurrying to find the tallest building from which to jump” (Blevens, 2005). One Scandalous Story looks at the thirteen days when the story of the affair between President Clinton and Monica Lewinsky was brewing, broke and flooded the airwaves as if no other story matter. “The press floundered because it tried to stretch its protocols for important stories and apply them to a soap opera sideshow” (Stepp, 2001).

Journalism Biography ($685.95)

To add balance to a predominately male-dominated biography section, I chose a number of works detailing the efforts of female journalists from the past to the present. I also selected the biographies of the heavy hitters in journalism, like Mike Wallace and David Brinkley, who were not already featured on the shelf. And I included a few works about reporters’ personal experiences covering the current war in Iraq.

Some works brought to light the efforts of journalists who were previously in the shadows like Giving Voice to the Voiceless, which “expose(s) the significant role of women in black press history” (Ratzlaff, 2004), and Front-Page Women Journalists, which “rightfully celebrates women's roles in opening opportunities to future frontpage women” (Weston, 2003).

Writing Anthologies ($207.33)

I chose 10 works that reflected worthy examples in feature, editorial, investigative, science, nature, and sports writing. The Art of Fact “illustrates the existence and richness of literary journalism”(Connery, 1998). Pulitzer Prize Feature Stories is labeled “a must” for journalism libraries (Haber, 1998). The annual series, The Best American Sports Writing “is reliably compelling and surprisingly addictive” ( Publishers Weekly, 2004). Shaking the Foundation shows “us investigative journalism's deep and important roots in American society”(Solberg, 2003).

I also included anthologies of women and black journalists like Journalistas, which received a favorable recommendation from Library Journal (Solberg, 2003) and The Black Press, which showcases the “persistent vitality of the black press over more than 170 years” (Boylan, 2002).

Books About Media Institutions ($114.80)

I only chose a few works in this category. The library had a nice selection of works devoted to this topic. I made sure to include a work on media giant Fox News with the selection Crazy Like a Fox, an “engaging and knowing report, propelled by some valuable insider interviews with influential figures such as former CNN Chairman Tom Johnson, NBC President and CEO Robert Wright and, naturally, (Fox CEO Roger) Ailes” (Folkenflik, 2004). I also included The Chain Gang: One Newspaper vs. the Gannett Empire, which details the struggle between the weekly Santa Fe Reporter and Gannett, which owns 91 daily newspapers and 21 television stations in the U.S. (Guardian Unlimited, 2006). The book is an “exceedingly well-told story of McCord's successful fight for survival in Santa Fe, N.M., and also of his guerrilla warfare to help another small paper survive (barely) against Gannett's underhanded tactics in Green Bay, Wis. The plot is Gutsy Underdog vs. Bullying Tycoon, and that makes it a good yarn”(Sherrill, 1996).

Reference ($470.70)

I selected nine works in this topic to begin a reference collection that currently does not exist in the library. The Practical Media Dictionary is “aimed at students just starting out in the industry” (Hodgson, 2004). Banned in the Media is “a useful addition to the reference room of any university’s general library collection” (Sumpter, 1999). The “high quality and thoroughness” of The Encyclopedia of Television News makes the work invaluable to browsers, students and researchers” (Quinn, 1999). History of the Mass Media in the United States, An Encyclopedia contains “useful cross-references and the concluding index, as well as alphabetical and topical lists of entries” (Booklist, 1999).

Crusaders, Scoundrels, Journalists is a work where readers will encounter over and over again “timeless quotes and images” (Stepp, 2000).

I also included style guides like The Associated Press Stylebook, the “usage bible for most newspapers” (Owens, 2005) and The Elements of Style, which has “long been considered the book of rules for English grammar and composition” (Montagne, 2005).

B. Weeding

I weeded 26 works from the library’s journalism section. I used the weeding criteria outlined in the Johnson text, Fundamentals of Collection Development & Management. I examined the content, condition and date of publication of each of the works (Johnson, 2004). The majority of the materials, around 70 percent, were withdrawn either because later editions superseded them or because the content was out-of-date and no longer relevant in today’s media world. Other works were deaccessioned due to poor condition or because the library contained duplicate copies.

Many of the journalism handbooks billed themselves as “contemporary” although they were written in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, well before the transformation in media. Since I removed 17 guides, I made a point to search for updated handbooks for journalists to help them weave through the maze of all facets of reporting.

“Staying current with the new methods and expanded horizons brought by digital technology is difficult enough for daily reporters, and is doubly difficult to assess and condense for the journalism student, particularly as they continue to evolve. Any textbook on the market today needs to be viewed through that filter, or our Web-savvy students will deem us hopelessly outdated” (Swallows, 2004).

Successful guides would blend traditional newsgathering and reporting skills with tips on how to use digital technologies and understand expanding news markets.

The Works

A number of materials were pulled because the information contained inside them was outdated and no longer relevant or useful. For example David Dary’s Radio News Handbook is a guide to budding broadcasters on the layout of the local radio station. The book contains photographs of the “latest” technology--the teletype machine--and gives suggestions on the type of equipment a radio station should possess (e.g. at least one telephone and a typewriter). It also lists the salaries of employees such as the station’s news director who can expect to make between $90 to $125 per week. Although handy for the period in which it was written, it hardly reflects today’s radio station. I chose to replace Dary’s work with Philip Seib’s Going Live: Getting the News Right in Real-Time World, Online World, which has been described as a book that would interest any undergraduate student studying mass communication (Hindman, 2002). Going Live “has the right blend of high profile examples, behind-- the-scenes details, and attention to technological issues to make it a useful addition to an undergraduate's personal library” (Hindman, 2002). I also selected Paul Chantler and Peter Stewart’s Basic Radio Journalism.

Similar to Radio News Handbook, Henry Stapler’s The Student Journalist and Sports Editing and The Student Journalist and Sports Reporting depict reporting environments that no longer exist. They describe in great detail how to paste up a sports page and how to retrieve information from the latest technological sources. Removing these two works reduced the sports-writing collection by 50 percent. To remedy this, I selected Abraham Aamidor’s Real Sports Reporting and Conrad Fink’s Sportswriting: The Lively Game. Both are highly recommended for individuals interested in sports writing. Andrew’s work “packs between its covers a universe of knowledge” (Pitt, 2003). Fink’s book provides many examples of bad and good writing and reporting, which “provide a depth that is deeper than in some other reporting and writing textbooks” (Shain, 2001).

Curtis MacDougall’s Principles of Editorial Writing includes obsolete methods of gathering information (e.g. canned reviews from the Industrial News Review, which no longer exists) and alien word usage (e.g. “Afghanistanism,” a long harangue) as did another work of his The Press and Its Problems where he labels the common press critic as “Socialist, Communist, labor-agitators and radicals”(MacDougall, 1969). The library contained only two volumes on editorial writing so I decided to replace MacDougall’s work with three works on editorial writing. They include: Rystrom’s The Who, Why and How of the Editorial Page(4th ed.) and Pulitzer Prize Editorial: America’s Best Writing 1917-2003(3rd ed.). One reviewer of Rystrom’s book said “the tips in that chapter became slides in my college course and at high school journalism workshops” (Berner, 2004). In reviewing the second edition of Pulitzer Prize Editorial, Garnter states the anthology “presents a fresh opportunity to be inspired and encouraged” after a grueling week in the newsroom (Garnter, 1994). I’ve also chosen a number of media criticism books that flesh out the arguments critical of today’s media.

Maury Green’s Television News Anatomy and Process, published in 1969, and two videotapes Broadcast News: How it Works and How a Television Station Works, both produced in 1989, provide glimpses into the workings of broadcast stations one would not encounter today. They focus on antiquated technologies, like microwave feeds, and outdated news sources. Television New Anatomy gives insight into salaries, the major media markets and the major jobs—for 1969, not 2006. The works are designed to give students a glimpse into how stories get played and how news is gathered. Similarly Vernon Stone’s Let’s Talk Pay in Television and Radio News provides salary figures from 1992. To replace these selections, I chose Matthew Robert Kerbel’s If It Bleeds, It Leads: An Anatomy of Television News. Kerbel is a self-described student of mass media and a former television writer (Knowles, 1995). Reviewer Bill Knowles, reviewing another of Kerbel’s works, said Kerbel has “learned well and practiced well” (Knowles, 1995). A review in The Jerusalem Post describes If It Bleeds as an “entertaining, but highly disturbing analysis” of the television news industry (Collins, 2001). The book “provides cogent analysis of why and how the shows rely on brevity, simplicity, and shock value to entertain and inform.” (Bush, 2000). The videos will be replaced by two DVDs produced by Films for the Humanities & Sciences. One, Feeding the Beast: An Inside Look at the News Media, examines how news stations cope with filling the 24-hour-seven-day-a-week news cycle. It originally aired on ABC’s Nightline. The second DVD, TV News: Writing and Editing the Story, examines the process of creating a television news program from start to finish.

The books, Electronic News Gathering: A Guide to ENG written by Robert Musburger and Editing Your Newsletter: A Guide to Writing, Design and Production, written by Mark Beach, guide readers through the use of technologies that are obsolete and no longer used in filming television news or creating newsletters. The library contains a somewhat updated version of newsletter creation written by Beach that incorporates the use of a computer. It has handy instructions on presentation and layout. Musburger’s guide will be replaced by another updated guide authored by Musburger titled Introduction to Media Production: The Path to Digital Media Production (3rd ed.)

John Chancellor and Walter Mears’ The New News Business, published in 1995, had little to do with the new news and more with the old-style of newsgathering (Brislin, 1995). “There is no basic text for teaching students how to become reporters in the journalism industry that along with changing its technology is changing its style of organization, coverage, writing and presentation” (Brislin, 1995). Brislin states the book is not a “primer,” and instead offers advice to journalists who are used to dealing with sources high in the federal government. I chose to replace this work with Rick Wilbur and Randy Miller’s Modern Media Writing, which gives students the tools to write for a variety of news mediums like print or the Web, and reflects the changing media environment. Modern Media Writing is “more successful at capturing journalism today” (Swallow, 2004).

A handful of other selections will be updated by the latest editions. They include:

Floyd Baskette and Jack Sissors’ The Art of Editing, “the editing text against which others are measured” (Richter, 1996); Julian Harriss, Kelly Leiter, and Stanley Johnson’s The Complete Reporter: Fundamentals of News Gathering, Writing and Editing; Frederick Shook’s The Broadcast News Process; and Ken Metzler’s Creative Interviewing: The Writer’s Guide to Asking Questions.

A few works were deselected because the library possessed multiple copies or had numerous works on topic. Specifically, the library contained five works on William Allen White, the deceased editor of the Emporia Gazette, based in Kansas. The books have not been checked out in at least five years although the time frame could be longer. Since the library updated its circulation system, the circulation records only date back five years. I chose to weed two of the five, picking the items that had more wear and tear than the others.

A few works were pulled due to their physical condition. Sheean’s Personal History, published in 1935, left a film of dust on the hands after handling it. The binding had also separated from the pages. Some of the yellowed pages in Tebbel’s An American Dynasty were torn and the binding was unraveling. It was difficult to find other selections to replace Sheean’s autobiography. A book by Howard Good titled The Journalist as Autobiographer received half-hearted reviews from Choice and The Journal of American History. I decided to reorder another copy of Sheean’s work. It is out-of-print, but available for reorder for $9.95 through Carol Publishing Co., according to Books in Print. The decision to reorder Tebbel’s work was less simple since it would cost $92.95 for a book that had not circulated in the last five years. I decided to wait until a patron requested the item before reordering. The biography of Joseph Meddill could be found on various Web sites including the site for Northwestern University’s Meddill School of Journalism.


Reference List


Anderson, B. (2000). Pursuing small, independent book publishers. Counterpoise, 4 (3), 17-9.


Anonymous.(2005, Fall). ). Into the buzzsaw: Leading journalists expose the myth of a free press[Review of the book Into the buzzsaw: Leading journalists expose the myth of a free press]. School Library Journal, 2(2), 72. Retrieved 22 February 2006 from WilsonSelectPlus.


Berner, R.T. (2004, Autumn). Suitable for students, editorial writing, 4th ed. [Review of the book The why, who and how of the editorial page]. The Masthead. 56 (3), 23. Retrieved 21 February 2006 from Expanded Academic ASAP.


Bernt, J. (2005, Summer). The creation of the media: The political origins of modern communication [Review of the book The creation of the media: The political origins of modern communication]. Journalism History, 31 (2), 118-9. Retrieved 23 February, 2006 from ProQuest.


Blevens, F.(2005, Winter). Into the buzzsaw: Leading journalists expose the myth of a free press[Review of the book Into the buzzsaw: Leading journalists expose the myth of a free press]. Journalism History, 30(4), 215. Retrieved 18 February 2006 from ProQuest.


Boylan, J. (2002, January/February). The black press: New literary and historical essays [Review of the book The black press: New literary and historical essays]. Columbia Journalism Review, 40 (5), 79. Retrieved 26 February 2006 from Expanded Academic ASAP.


Boylan, J. (2005 November/December). Tell me no lies: Investigative journalism that changed the world [Review of the book Tell me no lies: Investigative journalism that changed the world]. Columbia Journalism Review, 44 (4), 69. Retrieved 23 February, 2006 from Expanded Academic ASAP.


Bush, V. (2005, February). If it bleeds, it leads: book review [Review of the book If it bleeds, it leads: An anatomy of television news]. Booklist, 96 (12), 1054. Retrieved 22 February 2006 from BookReview.


Cayuga Community College Web site (2005). http://www.cayuga-cc.edu/index.php.


Claussen, D. S. (2001, fall). The elements of journalism: What newspeople should know and the public should expect by Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel[Review of the book: The elements of journalism: What newspeople should know and the public should expect]. Newspaper Research Journal, 22(4), 101-4. Retrieved 15 February 2006 from ProQuest.


Collins, L. (2001, March 2) ‘Headless man in topless bar – details at 11’[Review of the book If it bleeds, it leads: An anatomy of television news]. The Jerusalem Post, 13 B. Retrieved 15 February 2006 from Lexis/Nexis.


Connery, T. (1998, Summer). The art of fact: A historical anthology of literary journalism [Review of the book The art of fact: A historical anthology of literary journalism]. Journalism History, 24(2), 87-8. Retrieved 15 February 2006 from ProQuest.


Fischer, R. L. (2005, July). Bad news: the decline of reporting, the business of news, and the dangers to us all [Review of the book Bad news: The decline of reporting, the business of news, and the danger to us all]. USA Today, 134 (2722), 80. Retrieved 10 February 2006 from ProQuest.


Folkenflik, D. (2004, April 18). Fox trounces CNN: Cable news saga [Review of the book Crazy like a fox: The inside story of how Fox News beat CNN], The Baltimore Sun, 13F. Retrieved 14 February 2006 from Lexis/Nexis.


Garrison, B. (2001, Winter). Computer-assisted reporting near complete adoption. Newspaper Research Journal, 22 (1), 65-80. Retrieved 14 February 2006 from ProQuest.


Gartner, M. (1994, Winter). Aspire to explain clearly, attack dearly -- Pulitzer Prize editorials: America's best editorial writing 1917-1993 (Second Edition) by Wm. David Sloan and Laird Anderson [Review of the book Pulitzer Prize editorials: America’s best editorial writing, 1917-1993, (2nd ed.)]. The Masthead, 46 (3), 27. Retrieved 21 February 2006 from Expanded Academic ASAP.


Giles, K.L, (2002, October). Find it online [Review of the book Find it online: The complete guide to online research, 3rd ed.]. Library Journal, 127 (17), 64. Retrieved 25 February 2006 from MasterFILE Select

Haber, M.W. (1998, Autumn). Pulitzer Prize feature stories [Review of the book Pulitzer Prize feature stories]. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 53(3), 97-8. Retrieved 18 February 2006 from ProQuest.


Henderson, B. (2005, Winter). Digital dilemmas: Ethical issues for online media professionals/Web journalism: Practice and promise of a new medium/Understanding the Web: Social, political and economic dimensions of the Internet [Review of the book Digital dilemmas: Ethical issues for online media professionals]. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 59 (4), 421-5. Retrieved 25 February 26 from ProQuest.


Hentoff, Nat (2003, January). Class bias in the media? [Review of the book Coloring of the news: How political correctness has corrupted American journalism]. Editor and Publisher, 136 (1), 34. Retrieved 21 February 2006 from WilsonSelectPlus.


Hindman, D.B. (2002, Spring). Going live: Getting the news right in real-time world, online world [Review of the book Going live: Getting the news right in real-time world, online world]. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 79 (1), 229-230. Retrieved 18 February 2006 from ProQuest.


History of the mass media in the United States, an encyclopedia; Review [Review of the book History of the mass media in the United States, an encyclopedia]. (1999, March). Booklist, 95 (14), 1357. Retrieved 20 February 2006 from Lexis/Nexis.


Hodgson, J. (2004). The Practical Media Dictionary [Review of the book The Practical Media Dictionary]. Reference Reviews, 18 (3), 47. Retrieved 18 February 2006 from ProQuest.


Ireland, D. (1997, July). Wizards of media Oz: Behind the curtain of mainstream news; book reviews. The Nation, 265, (4), 33. Retrieved 18 February 2006 from Lexis/Nexis.

Johnson, P. (2004). Fundamentals of collection development & management (pg. 141-2). Chicago: American Library Association.


Leddy, C. (2004, July). The interviewer’s handbook[Review of the book The interviewer’s handbook]. The Writer, 117(7), 47. Retrieved 18 February 2006 from Expanded Academic ASAP.


Knowles, B. (1995, Summer). Book reviews—Edited for television—CNN, ABC, and the 1992 presidential campaign by Matthew Robert Kerbel. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 72 (2), 465-6. Retrieved 22 February 2006 from ProQuest.


MacDougall, C. (1964). The press and its problems (pg. 120). Dubuque, IA: W.C. Brown Company Publishers.


Martin, S. (1990, February 26). On a mission toward journalistic excellence. St. Petersburg Times, 1A. Retrieved 25 February 2006 from Lexis/Nexis.


Montagne, R. (2005, November 2). William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White's book "Elements of style" goes beyond words (Transcript). National Public Radio. Retrieved 20 February 2006 from Lexis/Nexis.


Owens, G. (2005, January 25). Historically speaking, it’s ‘a’ or ‘an’. The Daily Oklahoman, 5D. Retrieved 20 February 2006 from Lexis/Nexis.


Pitt, D. (2003, September). Real sports reporting [Review of the book Real sports reporting] The Booklist, 100 (1), 42. Retrieved 20 February 2006 from ProQuest.


Posner, R. (2005, July). Bad news. New York Times Book Review, 27, 1. Retrieved 24 February 2006 from ProQuest.


Quinn, M. (1999, February). Encyclopedia of television news [Review of the book Encyclopedia of television news]. Booklist, 95 (12), 1088. Retrieved 20 February 2006 from ProQuest.


Ratzlaff, A. (2004, Spring). Giving voice to the voiceless: Four pioneering black women journalists [Review of the book Giving voice to the voiceless: Four pioneering black women journalists]. Journalism History, 30 (1), 48-9. Retrieved 26 February 2006 from ProQuest.


Richter, D.W. (1996, Summer/Fall). The art of editing, 6th ed. [Review of the book The art of editing, 6th ed.] Newspaper Research Journal, 17(3/4), 136-7. Retrieved February 19, 2006 from ProQuest.


Roth, N.L.(2004, January). A procrastinator’s paradise [Review of the book Writing to deadline: The journalist at work]. English Journal, 93 (3), 99-100. Retrieved 25 February, 2006 from ProQuest.


Shain, R. (2001, Spring). Sportswriting: The lively game [Review of the book Sportswriting: The lively game]. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 56 (1), 93-4. Retrieved 20 February 2006 from ProQuest.


Sherrill, R.(1996, December 2). Taking on the Gannett Goliath [review of the book The chain gang: one newspaper vs. the Gannett empire]. The Washington Post, C03. Retrieved 18 February 2006 from Lexis/Nexis.


Snyder, R.(2004, July/August). In the beginning ... government made media policy, and it was good [Review of the book The creation of the media: Political origins of modern communication]. Columbia Journalism Review, 43 (2), 52-4. Retrieved 25 February, 2006 from Expanded Academic ASAP.


Solberg, J. (2002, May). Covering catastrophe [Review of the book Covering catastrophe: How broadcast journalists in New York, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania reported September 11, 2001]. Library Journal, 127 (8), 114. Retrieved 25 February, 2006 from MasterFILE Select.


Solberg, J. (2003, September). “Shaking the foundation: 200 years of investigative journalism in America [Review of the book Shaking the foundation: 200 years of investigative journalism in America]. Library Journal, 128 (5), 66. Retrieved 25 February, 2006 from MasterFILE Select.


Solberg, J. (2005 December). Journalistas: 100 years of the best writing and reporting by women journalists. [Review of the book Journalistas: 100 years of the best writing and reporting by women journalists] Library Journal, 130 (20), 142-3. Retrieved 23 February, 2006 from MasterFILE Select.


Stepp, C.S. (2000, March). Artful snippets on a somewhat noble profession [Review of the book Crusaders, journalists: The Newseum's most intriguing newspeople]. Columbia Journalism Review, 22 (2), 65. Retrieved 25 February 2006 from Expanded Academic ASAP.


Stepp, C.S. (2001, October). It was all about sex [Review of the book One scandalous story: Clinton, Lewinsky, & thirteen days that tarnished American journalism]. American Journalism Review, 23 (8), 81. Retrieved 25 February, 2006 from Expanded Academic ASAP.


Sumpter, R.S. (1999 Spring). Banned in the media: A reference guide to censorship in the press, motion pictures, broadcasting, and the Internet [Review of the book Banned in the media: A reference guide to censorship in the press, motion pictures, broadcasting, and the Internet]. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 76 (1), 165. Retrieved 18 February 2006 from ProQuest.


Swallow, W.W. (2004, Winter). Modern media writing/Getting the whole story: Reporting and writing the news [Reviews of the books Modern media writing and Getting the whole story: Reporting and writing the news]. Journalism & Mass Communication Editor, 58 (4), 401-5. Retrieved 24 February 2006 from ProQuest.


The best American sportswriting, 2004 [Review of the book The best American sportswriting, 2004]. (2004, September). Publishers Weekly, 251 (37), 67. Retrieved 25 February 2006 from MasterFILE Select.


The shy giant. (2006, February 9). Guardian Unlimited, B2. Retrieved 26 February 2006 from Lexis/Nexis.


Water, C. (2002, June). Shades of truth [Review of the book Coloring the news: How crusading for diversity has corrupted American journalism]. American Spectator, 13 (4), 58. Retrieved 25 February, 2006 from MasterFILE Select.

Weiler, A. (2001, August). Journalism and the new media [Review of the book Journalism and the new media]. Library Journal, 123 (13), 125. Retrieved 25 February, 2006 from MasterFILE Select.


Weinberg, S. (2003, February). Memorable nonfiction storytelling, taught by example[Review of the book Inside the writer’s mind: Writing narrative journalism]. Writer, 116 (2), 45. Retrieved 25 February, 2006 from MasterFILE Select.


Welch, M. (2002, December). Woe is media. Reason, 34 (7), 7-8. Retrieved 25 February, 2006 from MasterFILE Select.


Weston, M. (2003, Fall). Front-page women journalists, 1920-1950 [Review of the book Front-page women journalists, 1920-1950]. Journalism History, 29 (3), 149. Retrieved 25 February, 2006 from ProQuest.


When the news went live: Dallas 1963 [Review of the book When the news went live: Dallas 1963]. (2004, June). Publishers Weekly, 251 (26), 39. Retrieved 25 February, 2006 from MasterFILE Select.


Appendix – Books Added

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