Section mm; Column 0; T: Men's Fashion Magazine; Pg. 76




НазваниеSection mm; Column 0; T: Men's Fashion Magazine; Pg. 76
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URL: http://www.nytimes.com


SUBJECT: CATS (89%); WILDLIFE (89%); BEEF CATTLE FARMING (89%); WILDLIFE CONSERVATION (89%); SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (78%); FORESTS & WOODLANDS (77%); RICE FARMING (77%); ENVIRONMENTALISM (77%); FARMERS & RANCHERS (69%); WILD CATS (90%); MAMMALS (89%)


GEOGRAPHIC: SOUTH AMERICA (94%); BRAZIL (94%)


LOAD-DATE: January 1, 2008


LANGUAGE: ENGLISH


GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: PREDATOR AND PREY: In the Pantanal region of Brazil, a jaguar on the Fazenda San Francisco ranch, top, and cattle being watched by a Pantaneiro cowboy, above. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY THOMAS NASH)

TRACES: A jaguar kill at Fazenda Sao Bento, above. At another Pantanal ranch, below, a biologist, Ricardo Costa, examines scat from a jaguar. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY THOMAS NASH) MAP: Pantanal, Brazil. (SATELLITE PHOTOGRAPH BY NASA )


PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company





1229 of 1231 DOCUMENTS


The New York Times


January 1, 2008 Tuesday

Late Edition - Final


Road To Nowhere


BYLINE: By DAVID BROOKS


SECTION: Section A; Column 0; Editorial Desk; OP-ED COLUMNIST; Pg. 17


LENGTH: 821 words


The most impressive thing about Mitt Romney is his clarity of mind. When he set out to pursue his party's nomination, he studied the contours of the Republican coalition and molded himself to its forms.

Earnestly and methodically, he has appealed to each of the major constituency groups. For national security conservatives, he vowed to double the size of the prison at Guantanamo Bay. For social conservatives, he embraced a culture war against the faithless. For immigration skeptics, he swung so far right he earned the endorsement of Tom Tancredo.

He has spent roughly $80 million, including an estimated $17 million of his own money, hiring consultants, blanketing the airwaves and building an organization that is unmatched on the Republican side.

And he has turned himself into the party's fusion candidate. Some of his rivals are stronger among social conservatives. Others are stronger among security conservatives, but no candidate has a foot in all camps the way Romney does. No candidate offends so few, or is the acceptable choice of so many.

And that is why Romney is at the fulcrum of the Republican race. He's looking strong in Iowa and is the only candidate who can afford to lose an important state and still win the nomination.

And yet as any true conservative can tell you, the sort of rational planning Mitt Romney embodies never works. The world is too complicated and human reason too limited. The PowerPoint mentality always fails to anticipate something. It always yields unintended consequences.

And what Romney failed to anticipate is this: In turning himself into an old-fashioned, orthodox Republican, he has made himself unelectable in the fall. When you look inside his numbers, you see tremendous weaknesses.

For example, Romney is astoundingly unpopular among young voters. Last month, the Harris Poll asked Republicans under 30 whom they supported. Romney came in fifth, behind Rudy Giuliani, Mike Huckabee, John McCain and Ron Paul. Romney had 7 percent support, a virtual tie with Tancredo. He does only a bit better among those aged 30 to 42.

Romney is also quite unpopular among middle- and lower-middle class voters. In poll after poll, he leads among Republicans making more than $75,000 a year. He does poorly among those who make less.

If Romney is the general election candidate, he will face hostility from independent voters, who value authenticity. He will face hostility from Hispanic voters, who detest his new immigration positions. He will face great hostility in the media. Even conservative editorialists at places like The Union Leader in New Hampshire and The Boston Herald find his flip-flopping offensive.

But his biggest problem is a failure of imagination. Market research is a snapshot of the past. With his data-set mentality, Romney has chosen to model himself on a version of Republicanism that is receding into memory. As Walter Mondale was the last gasp of the fading New Deal coalition, Romney has turned himself into the last gasp of the Reagan coalition.

That coalition had its day, but it is shrinking now. The Republican Party is more unpopular than at any point in the past 40 years. Democrats have a 50 to 36 party identification advantage, the widest in a generation. The general public prefers Democratic approaches on health care, corruption, the economy and Iraq by double-digit margins. Republicans' losses have come across the board, but the G.O.P. has been hemorrhaging support among independent voters. Surveys from the Pew Research Center and The Washington Post, Kaiser Foundation and Harvard University show that independents are moving away from the G.O.P. on social issues, globalization and the roles of religion and government.

If any Republican candidate is going to win this year, he will have to offer a new brand of Republicanism. But Romney has tied himself to the old brand. He is unresponsive to the middle-class anxiety that Huckabee is tapping into. He has forsaken the trans-partisan candor that McCain represents. Romney, the cautious consultant, is pivoting to stress his corporate competence, and is rebranding himself as an Obama-esque change agent, but he will never make the sort of daring break that independent voters will demand if they are going to give the G.O.P. another look.

The leaders of the Republican coalition know Romney will lose. But some would rather remain in control of a party that loses than lose control of a party that wins. Others haven't yet suffered the agony of defeat, and so are not yet emotionally ready for the trauma of transformation. Others still simply don't know which way to turn.

And so the burden of change will be thrust on primary voters over the next few weeks. Romney is a decent man with some good fiscal and economic policies. But in this race, he has run like a manager, not an entrepreneur. His triumph this month would mean a Democratic victory in November.


URL: http://www.nytimes.com


SUBJECT: EDITORIALS & OPINIONS (90%); US PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES 2008 (90%); US REPUBLICAN PARTY (90%); POLITICAL CANDIDATES (90%); VOTERS & VOTING (89%); POLITICAL PARTIES (89%); CAMPAIGNS & ELECTIONS (78%); ELECTIONS (77%); PRISONS (77%); HISPANIC AMERICANS (76%); MARKET RESEARCH (73%); NATIONAL SECURITY (72%); IMMIGRATION (71%); POLLS & SURVEYS (70%); MARKET RESEARCH & ANALYSIS (62%); CONSULTING SERVICES (55%)


COMPANY: BOSTON HERALD (51%)


PERSON: MITT ROMNEY (96%); JOHN MCCAIN (53%); RUDY GIULIANI (53%); RON PAUL (53%); MICHAEL HUCKABEE (53%); THOMAS G TANCREDO (71%)


GEOGRAPHIC: UNITED STATES (92%); CUBA (72%)


LOAD-DATE: January 1, 2008


LANGUAGE: ENGLISH


DOCUMENT-TYPE: Op-Ed


PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company





1230 of 1231 DOCUMENTS


The New York Times


January 1, 2008 Tuesday

Late Edition - Final


Ettore Sottsass, Designer, Is Dead at 90


BYLINE: By ROBIN J. POGREBIN


SECTION: Section B; Column 0; The Arts/Cultural Desk; Pg. 7


LENGTH: 893 words


Ettore Sottsass, an eminence grise of postmodern design who helped found the influential Memphis Group and was responsible for the familiar bright red plastic Olivetti typewriter, died Monday at his home in Milan. He was 90.

His death was confirmed by Francesco Rutelli, the Italian culture and tourism minister.

Although trained and active as an architect, Mr. Sottsass secured a permanent place in pop culture with his designs of everyday items, including office cabinets, table lamps, ice buckets and silverware.

''He was truly a giant of design,'' said Paola Antonelli, the senior curator in the Museum of Modern Art's department of architecture and design. ''He had a capacity to really feel the times that he was living in and to change with them.''

Recently, Mr. Sottsass experienced something of a renaissance. Last March, the Design Museum in London devoted an exhibition to his work called ''Work in Progress.'' In September, both the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Friedman Benda gallery in Manhattan featured his pieces in exhibitions.

In 2006, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art presented what was billed as the first major American survey of his work.

And in early December, a Sottsass retrospective opened in Trieste, Italy, observing his 90th birthday, on Sept. 14. The exhibition, called ''I Want to Know Why,'' includes 130 of his designs and continues until March 2.

''I would like the visitors to leave crying,'' Mr. Sottsass said of the exhibition in an interview with the news agency ANSA. ''That is, with emotion.''

Born in Innsbruck, Austria, in 1917, Mr. Sottsass studied architecture in Turin, Italy, and opened his first studio in Milan in 1947.

He worked as a design consultant for Olivetti from 1958 to 1980, creating the Elea 9003 calculator and the popular portable red typewriter, released on Valentine's Day in 1969. Mr. Sottsass referred to his typewriter as the ''anti-machine machine.'' Its features included a carriage that dropped to the level of the keyboard and a storage case, though it was the color that made it memorable.

''Every color has a history,'' Mr. Sottsass said two years ago. ''Red is the color of the Communist flag, the color that makes a surgeon move faster and the color of passion.''

In the 1970s, Alessi hired Mr. Sottsass, who designed various items for the company, like ice condiment sets, soup plates and coasters. He also designed a decanter for Baccarat; a chair for Knoll; and carpet for Namastre.

In the 1980s, Mr. Sottsass was one of the founders and the leading figure of Memphis, the Milan design group famous for brightly colored postmodern furniture, lighting and ceramics. Its collection includes glassworks, and large sculptural cabinets made of acrylic, aluminum and tropical wood.

Mr. Sottsass was known for his playfulness and wit as well as his whimsical ornamentation. His Adesso Pero stained-wood bookshelf from 1992 looks like three red lightning bolts shooting into a red platform. His Tahiti lamp, from 1981, resembles a tropical bird with a long yellow neck and boxy red beak.

''He never lost the love of the object,'' said Susan Yelavich, an assistant professor at Parsons the New School for Design. ''There's a sensuality, a sheer hedonism, that is so welcome and undeniable.''

Mr. Sottsass was influenced by a wide range of artists and decorative styles. Reviewing a 2004 exhibition of his work at the Barry Friedman gallery in New York, ''A Master Returns,'' Roberta Smith wrote in The New York Times:

''The columnar, horizontally striped Superbox cabinets of 1968 may bring to mind Italy's striped Romanesque cathedrals, and work of American Minimalists like Anne Truitt and Agnes Martin, as does his famous striped 'Nefertiti' desk of 1970. The gray translucent fiberglass forms of his Mobili Grigio bedroom suite (1969-70) suggests a cartoon Art Deco, but also the gleaming fiberglass wall sculptures by the California artist Craig Kauffman.''

Because of Mr. Sottsass' quirky combination of the prosaic and the irreverent, his work has historically been something of a tough sell with collectors.

''Ettore's work makes such a strong statement that it's hard to decorate with it,'' Marc Benda of Benda Friedman said on the occasion of the gallery's Sottsass show. ''It's hard to fit it into a larger ensemble.''

Mr. Sottsass was part of an iconoclastic generation of Italian designers that included Castelli Ferrieri, Pier and Achille Castiglioni, Gae Aulenti and Joe Colombo, who transformed design with their use of new technologies and materials. He collaborated with well-known designers like Aldo Cibic, James Irvine and Matteo Thun.

His own architectural projects included Milan Malpensa Airport, a luxury yacht interior and a house for the design entrepreneur David M. Kelley in Silicon Valley.

Last October, he told The New York Times that his primary concern in building was for the human experience. ''My definition of architecture is to design a place where you stay, where you live,'' he said.

On the occasion of the Sottsass exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 2006, which he helped design, Mr. Sottsass said he found the notion of a retrospective ''a bit macabre.''

''It's like having a birthday party where too many relatives show up,'' he said, ''a sign that too much time has passed.''


URL: http://www.nytimes.com


SUBJECT: MUSEUMS & GALLERIES (90%); ART & ARTISTS (90%); EXHIBITIONS (90%); CULTURE DEPARTMENTS (77%); INTERVIEWS (77%); TOURISM DEVELOPMENT (72%)


COMPANY: BACCARAT (CIE DES CRISTALLERIES) (51%)


INDUSTRY: NAICS327112 VITREOUS CHINA, FINE EARTHENWARE, AND OTHER POTTERY PRODUCT MANUFACTURING (51%); SIC5023 HOME FURNISHINGS (51%); SIC3262 VITREOUS CHINA TABLE & KITCHEN ARTICLES (51%); NAICS327112 VITREOUS CHINA, FINE EARTHENWARE & OTHER POTTERY PRODUCT MANUFACTURING (51%)


GEOGRAPHIC: NEW YORK, NY, USA (79%); PHILADELPHIA, PA, USA (79%); LONDON, ENGLAND (79%); TURIN, ITALY (79%) CALIFORNIA, USA (91%); NEW YORK, USA (79%); PENNSYLVANIA, USA (79%) UNITED STATES (91%); ITALY (90%); ENGLAND (79%); UNITED KINGDOM (79%); AUSTRIA (58%)


CATEGORY: Fashion Design


PERSON: Ettore Sottsass


LOAD-DATE: January 1, 2008


LANGUAGE: ENGLISH


GRAPHIC: Photos: Ettore Sottsass, above, at the retrospective held in his honor at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 2006. From left, his Olivetti typewriter, Adesso Pero bookcase and Mobile Giallo chest of drawers. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY J. EMILIO FLORES)


DOCUMENT-TYPE: Obituary (Obit); Biography


PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company





1231 of 1231 DOCUMENTS


The New York Times


January 1, 2008 Tuesday

Late Edition - Final


On a Remote Path to Cures


BYLINE: By ANDREW DOWNIE


SECTION: Section C; Column 0; Business/Financial Desk; Pg. 1


LENGTH: 1558 words


DATELINE: NINACACA, Peru


High in the Peruvian Andes, a shaman rubs a fluffy white rabbit all over Chris Kilham's body, murmuring in Quechua, the language of these barren plains. Then she slits the animal's throat and lets the blood run into a tiny grave.

To Mr. Kilham, the offering -- an appeal to the gods for a bountiful harvest of maca, a local tuber -- is just another day at the office.

Part David Attenborough, part Indiana Jones, Mr. Kilham, an ethnobotanist from Massachusetts who calls himself the Medicine Hunter, has scoured remote jungles and highlands for three decades for plants, oils and extracts that can heal. He has eaten bees and scorpions in China, fired blow guns with Amazonian natives, and learned traditional war dances from Pacific Islanders.

But behind the colorful tales lies the prospect of money, lots of money -- for Western pharmaceutical companies, impoverished indigenous tribes and Mr. Kilham.

Products that once seemed exotic, like ginseng, ginkgo biloba or aloe vera, now roll off the tongues of Westerners. All told, natural plant substances generate more than $75 billion in sales each year for the pharmaceutical industry, $20 billion in herbal supplement sales, and around $3 billion in cosmetics sales, according to a study by the European Commission.

Although the efficacy of some of the products the herbal ingredients go into is hotly debated, their popularity is not in doubt. Thirty-six percent of adults in the United States use some form of what experts call complementary and alternative medicine, CAM for short, according to a 2004 study published by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, a division of the National Institutes of Health.

Mr. Kilham believes multinational drug companies underutilize the medicinal properties in plants. They pack pills with artificial compounds and sell them at huge markups, he says. He wants Westerners to use the pure plant medicines that indigenous peoples have used for thousands of years.

''People in the U.S. are more cranked up on pharmaceutical drugs than any other culture in the world today,'' Mr. Kilham said. ''I want people using safer medicine. And that means plant medicine.''

Easy going and earnest, Mr. Kilham, 55, caught the plant bug after taking an herb walk at an organic farm in Natick, Mass., in 1971. A self-described hippie, he was already into ''yoga, natural foods and meditation'' and the discovery that plants had medicinal properties had a profound effect. He created a course in holistic health at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where he is now on the faculty, and made his first overseas trip -- to India -- to track down exotic flora.

Now he can identify unusual plants by their Latin names and he proudly regales the uninitiated on their individual properties. Shortly after leaving Lima on a trip taking French businessmen to the Peruvian Andes, he stopped the van and enthusiastically explained how the tropane alkaloids in a dusty plant he spotted by the side of the road are used by ophthalmologists to dilate pupils for eye examinations.

Such properties are often well known by indigenous peoples. So-called bioprospectors can make their fortunes by bringing those advantages to the attention of companies who identify the plant's active compound and use it as a base ingredient for new products that they patent.

Some 62 percent of all cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration come from such discoveries, according to a study by the United Nations University, a scholarly institution affiliated with the United Nations.

''Latin American nations, especially Amazonian nations, have extremely rich and diverse flora, so the potential for commercial applications appears great,'' said Tony Gross, a Brazil-based researcher at the university. ''They say that in one in 10,000 you get something interesting. So it is not a gold mine, but when you do hit on something that does become a market leader you can make enormous amounts of money from it.''

In Peru, Mr. Kilham is betting on maca, a small root vegetable that grows here in the central highlands -- ''a turnip that packs a punch,'' he says, adding ''it imparts energy, sex drive and stamina like nothing else.''

That view is supported by studies carried out at the International Potato Center, a Lima-based research center that is internationally financed and staffed. Studies there show maca improves stamina, reduces the risk of prostate cancer and increases the motility, volume and quality of sperm.

Some peer reviewed studies published in the journal Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology backed up those findings.

For centuries, maca has been a revered crop in this austerely beautiful region 155 miles northeast of Lima. Inca warriors ate it before going into battle. Later, Peruvians used it to pay taxes to Spanish conquistadors.

Today, locals consume it boiled alongside dried vicuna meat in soups; or diced with carrots, peas and cauliflowers in salads. Maca flour is used to make sponge cake. Flavored with chocolate, it is made into maca puffs. Villagers offer visitors maca drinks and maca juice; airports sell maca toffees.

Mr. Kilham first heard about the tuber in 1996. Two years later, he went to Peru to find out more. There he formed a partnership with Sergio Cam, a Peruvian entrepreneur who invested much of the money he made as a construction worker in California from 1984 to 1999 to start Chakarunas Trading. The company is named after the Quechua word for men who build bridges between cultures.

Today, Chakarunas organizes local growers to sell their maca to the French firm Naturex, which extracts it into concentrate. Naturex sells the concentrate to Enzymatic Therapy, a Wisconsin-based company that makes and markets the finished maca products.

Thanks to the health supplements boom, both companies have grown, with Naturex's revenues topping $125 million in 2007 and Enzymatic Therapy's surpassing $80 million. Enzymatic Therapy sells $200,000 worth of maca-based products each month, said the company's chief executive Randy Rose.

One product, Maca Stimulant, is sold in Wal-Mart under Mr. Kilham's Medicine Hunter brand. Mr. Kilham earns a retainer from both Naturex and Enzymatic Therapy, in addition to royalties from another Medicine Hunter-branded product at Wal-Mart.

Mr. Kilham says he earns around $200,000 each year in retainers, and sales are so buoyant he expects to make ''in the mid-six figures'' in royalties next year.

Mr. Kilham insists he is not in the business simply for financial gain. His motivation comes from promoting herbal medicines and helping traditional communities, he said.

''I have financial security and don't need to make money from this,'' he said. ''I believe trade is the best way to get good medicines to the public, to help the environment and to help indigenous people.''

He and Mr. Cam pay growers here in Ninacaca a premium of 6 soles (about $2) for a kilo of maca, almost twice the going rate of 3 to 3.40 soles a kilo. They have set up a computer room at the Chakarunas warehouse and a free dental clinic, the town's first.

Mr. Kilham is clearly adored by the locals in these desolate, wind-swept villages. On a recent visit here, shamans, maca growers and their families flocked to him. Since only maca and potatoes grow at this altitude, they are thankful Mr. Kilham is helping them sell their produce.

He makes a point of returning regularly to Peru to affirm his commitment to the project. On this trip, his third this year, he brought executives from Phythea, a French company that sold 40 million euros of natural products last year. Phythea's president, Laurent Mallet, had heard about maca and wanted to see both the agricultural and social aspect of Chakarunas Trading up close.

Mr. Mallet said he was so touched by the people and the rawness of their surroundings -- it took him seven hours by van to get here, and several doses of oxygen to offset the headaches and nausea brought on by the altitude -- that he vowed to increase his order of maca from five to 25 tons next year, if clinical trials in Bordeaux confirmed that maca reduces hot flushes and night sweats in menopausal women.

''I think it could be a very good product for us,'' Mr. Mallet said. ''I especially like the human dimension. They want to build a school and a medical center.''

To be sure, not everyone is so positive. Mr. Kilham runs the constant risk of being branded a ''biopirate,'' an outsider who steals traditional knowledge and fails to pass on the benefits to the local community.

In 2001, the company Mr. Kilham worked for at the time, Pure World Botanics, obtained United States patents for isolating and extracting maca's key active compounds. The Peruvian government accused the company of profiting from what was rightfully Peru's.

Mr. Kilham said he fought to make his bosses open up the patents. The company denied they had acted improperly but Naturex, which bought Pure World Botanics in 2005, granted Peruvian companies free licenses to the patents and vowed to increase the price paid per kilo to maca farmers by 15 percent.

''At Naturex,'' the company's marketing manager, Antoine Dauby, said in a statement, ''we believe in giving back to the communities where we do business. And we're doing that in Peru.''


URL: http://www.nytimes.com


SUBJECT: PHARMACEUTICALS INDUSTRY (90%); NUTRITIONAL PHARMACEUTICALS (90%); ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (89%); HEALTH DEPARTMENTS (75%); RESEARCH REPORTS (72%); PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATION MFG (70%); TOILETRIES MFG (66%); SCIENCE NEWS (66%); MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS (63%); BOTANY (75%); MAMMALS (90%)


COMPANY: CNINSURE INC (70%)


ORGANIZATION: NEW YORK ISLANDERS (56%); EUROPEAN COMMISSION (55%)


TICKER: CISG (NASDAQ) (70%)


GEOGRAPHIC: MASSACHUSETTS, USA (93%); ANDES (88%) PERU (94%); SOUTH AMERICA (93%); UNITED STATES (93%); CHINA (79%); INDIA (71%); EUROPE (76%)


LOAD-DATE: January 1, 2008


LANGUAGE: ENGLISH


GRAPHIC: PHOTOS: Cesar Rosales with a herbal product in Lima, Peru, meant to purify the liver. Such remedies in Peru often date back thousands of years. Below, a traditional method is used to shake dirt from a batch of a popular root vegetable, maca. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENNIFER SZYMASZEK FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg.C1)

Dried maca

the plant, grown and celebrated in Peru's central highlands, is the subject of much debate.

Sofia Herrera, left, a shaman, performing a harvest ritual with Chris Kilham, center, his wife, Zoe Helene, and others.

A girl standing among sacks of maca waiting to be sold at a market in Lima. Some people consider maca a cure-all. (PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENNIFER SZYMASZEK FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES) (pg.C5)


PUBLICATION-TYPE: Newspaper


Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company

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