Independent (UK): Really ‘ tastes [looks and feels] like chicken ’




НазваниеIndependent (UK): Really ‘ tastes [looks and feels] like chicken ’
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THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE NEWS

Tuesday, 15 June, 2010


UNEP and the Executive Director in the News


  • Independent (Bangladesh): Fishy efforts of conservation

  • UN News Centre: Failure to protect wetlands puts migratory waterbirds at risk –UN

  • India Blooms (India): Protecting wetlands crucial for migratory birds

  • Scoop (New Zealand): Failure To Protect Wetlands Endangers Waterbirds

  • Spero News (US): Failure to protect wetlands puts migratory waterbirds at risk - UN

  • News Blaze (US): Failure to Protect Wetlands Puts Migratory Waterbirds At Risk

  • E-news Park Forest (US): Failure to Protect Wetlands Puts Migratory Waterbirds at Risk – UN

  • All Africa: Biden Pledges U.S. Support for Restoration of Mau Forest

  • ISRIA: Maldives’ desire to adopt green growth is influenced by economic and security advantages – says the Vice President

  • Australia.to: CLIMATE CHANGE: Maldives Inches Closer to HCFC Phase-out

  • IPS: Maldives Inches Closer to HCFC Phase-out
  • Independent (UK): Reallytastes [looks and feels] like chicken


  • Farm Weekly (Australia): Go veg to save the world, says UN














Intergovernmental Science Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) in the News


  • English Coverage

  • Spanish Coverage

  • French Coverage

  • German Coverage



Other Environment News


  • Reuters: Japan aims to pass climate bill by year-end U.N. talks

  • AFP: Green groups accuse Canada of G8, G20 environment snub

  • Christian Science Monitor: Scientists on hunt for climate-change clues explore rare tropical glacier

  • AFP: Exploiting whales, companies eye new products

  • Independent (UK): Japan may quit Whaling Commission over ban

  • Telegraph (UK): Nasa warns solar flares from 'huge space storm' will cause devastation

  • LA Times: Gulf oil spill: Time, money concerns led to BP's well design



Environmental News from the UNEP Regions


  • RONA

  • ROA



Other UN News


  • Environment News from the UN Daily News of June 14th 2010

  • Environment News from the S.G.’s Spokesman Daily Press Briefing of June 15th 2010 (None)



UNEP and the Executive Director in the News


Independent (Bangladesh): Fishy efforts of conservation


15th June 2010


By Achim Steiner


If you happen to be a salamander known as the Iranian Kaiser spotted newt, chances are that things may be looking up. Governments at the recent meeting in Doha of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) voted for a trade ban on Iranian Kaisers, alongside tougher protection for a host of land-living creatures.


But if you are a blue-fin tuna of the western Atlantic stock, your mood will be decidedly more pessimistic. It is a similar story for several species of shark, including the oceanic white-tip, scalloped hammerhead, and the great and spiny dogfish. Despite strong scientific evidence showing sharp declines in the populations of all three, every proposal for tougher trade controls on these marine species - along with more than 30 species of coral - failed to secure the necessary two-thirds majority.


In the case of the western Atlantic stock of blue-fin tuna, several countries argued that the existing management body - the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) - is best placed to manage the stock. Others who proposed tougher trade rules were not convinced with good reason. Stocks of this highly prized fish have declined by up to 80 per cent since the dawn of industrialized fishing, and this has been on ICCAT's watch. In the case of sharks and rays, a recent survey indicates that close to one-third of the 64 ocean-living species are on the verge of extinction.


Their decline is linked to over-exploitation of other once-common species. For example, spiny dogfish is partly substituting for cod in many European fish-and-chip shops. Sharks, too, are suffering from rapidly rising demand for shark-fin soup, which is considered a delicacy in many parts of Asia.


But saving endangered and near-endangered species is not just about conservation; it is also about defending millions of people's livelihoods, which depend on healthy oceans. Today's marine environment is truly under siege. When the explorer John Cabot sailed off the coast of Newfoundland more than 500 years ago, vast shoals of cod slowed down his ships; crews could lower buckets over the side and fill them with fish.


By 1992, however, over-fishing had forced the total closure of this once highly productive fishery, and, despite all efforts, Newfoundland's Grand Banks has never recovered. Similarly, over-fishing of sharks in the Caribbean has triggered a rise in octopus and a drastic drop in spiny lobsters and scallops that were two major sources of revenue for neighboring coastal communities.


The outcome at CITES has brought into sharp relief increasing tensions between industrial and environmental interests, as if, these were diametrically opposed. Surely a twenty-first-century fisherman does not want to see the basis of his or her living degraded and destroyed, nor does a modern conservationist want to ring-fence the environment and stop people from making a living.


So if governments want existing agreements to rule the waves, they must start acting on the sobering science and real-world numbers. Moreover, an international action plan for sharks, including a ceiling on catches, should be created. And proper fishing methods that catch only target species should be used, with others caught accidentally as so-called by-catch returned to the sea alive. Where fisheries agreements are not succeeding, conservation agreements must be tried and applied.


After all, these are not competing regulatory regimes, but complimentary ones.

In the case of the western Atlantic blue-fin tuna, the ball is now firmly back in ICCAT's court. Governments that support the ICCAT option must now prove that it is up to the job. They have three years to do so, before CITES next meets in Thailand. If there is no dramatic action and improvement, governments should instead give CITES, as a well established conservation and trade agreement, a chance to reverse the species' current plight.


Blue-fin tuna is heading for commercial, if not outright, extinction, as are a host of other economically and ecologically important marine species. They are swimming in the last-chance lagoon. But so, too, could be the organizations that have presided over a breathtaking collapse of so many fisheries and left a once-bountiful marine environment and the lives and livelihoods of many fishermen damaged and degraded in their wake.


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_________________________________________________________________


UN News Centre: Failure to protect wetlands puts migratory waterbirds at risk

UN


14th June 2010


Efforts to conserve migratory waterbirds are being threatened by the lack of protection of key wetlands used by the birds as they traverse Africa, the Middle East, Europe and Central Asia, according to an inter-agency information website launched today with the support of the United Nation Environment Programme (UNEP).


Migratory waterbirds, such as waders, terns and geese, need an unbroken chain of wetlands to complete their annual life-cycles, according to the new information tool dubbed “Critical Site Network (CSN),” jointly developed by Wetlands International, BirdLife International and the UNEP’s World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC).


One third of the critical wetlands, the world’s most vulnerable ecosystems, are entirely unprotected and as a result, an alarming 42 per cent of the migratory waterbird species are in decline, according to the website. The same wetlands benefit people by providing clean water and opportunities for fishing, agriculture, recreation and tourism.


“The Critical Site Network Tool will provide an unprecedented level of access to information for all waterbird species covered by the African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbird Agreement (AEWA),” said Bert Lenten, Executive Secretary of AEWA, an international wildlife treaty administered by UNEP. “It brings together for the first time some of the most current and comprehensive information available internationally on the species and the sites they use,” he added. “To target conservation efforts effectively, access to reliable information about the critical sites that migratory waterbirds depend upon, and the ecological requirements of these species, is key,” Mr. Lenten stressed.


Marco Lambertini, Chief Executive of BirdLife International, said the CSN identifies priority sites for the protection of migratory waterbirds and highlights knowledge gaps, revealing that many stop-over and non-breeding localities were still not well known.

“Only by combining adequate knowledge, targeted action, appropriate funding and local capacity on the ground will we be able to make a difference for migratory species,” he added.


The tool, whose development was partly funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), an international environment financing organization, provides comprehensive information on 294 waterbird species from 3,020 sites. It is designed to make information easily available on the most important sites for migratory waterbirds, both at the national and international level. In a related development, new conservation plans for the Siberian crane have been endorsed to save the species from extinction, UNEP reported during a meeting of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS) in Bonn today.


“During the International Year of Biodiversity, CMS continues to protect this majestic bird and its wetland habitats that are critical to humans and species alike,” said CMS Executive Secretary Elizabeth Maruma Mrema. “Not only [do] these ecosystems supply drinking water, but they act as a flood defence and as carbon sink to mitigate climate change,” she added. During its annual migration the Siberian crane travels 5,000 kilometres from its breeding grounds in western Siberia and Yakutia, intermediate resting and feeding places, to its wintering sites in southern China and Iran.


In the course of these journeys along three migration routes, called flyways, they overcome considerable obstacles such as high mountains and vast deserts. Major threats such as hunting in West and Central Asia and the drainage of critical wetlands in East Asia put them at an even greater risk. Only 3,000 to 3,500 birds remain globally.


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_________________________________________________________________


India Blooms (India): Protecting wetlands crucial for migratory birds


15th June 2010


Efforts to conserve migratory waterbirds are being threatened by the lack of protection of key wetlands used by the birds as they traverse Africa, the Middle East, Europe and Central Asia, according to an inter-agency information website launched on Monday with the support of the United Nation Environment Programme (UNEP).


Migratory waterbirds, such as waders, terns and geese, need an unbroken chain of wetlands to complete their annual life-cycles, according to the new information tool dubbed “Critical Site Network (CSN),” jointly developed by Wetlands International, BirdLife International and the UNEP’s World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC).


One third of the critical wetlands, the world’s most vulnerable ecosystems, are entirely unprotected and as a result, an alarming 42 per cent of the migratory waterbird species are in decline, according to the website. The same wetlands benefit people by providing clean water and opportunities for fishing, agriculture, recreation and tourism.


“The Critical Site Network Tool will provide an unprecedented level of access to information for all waterbird species covered by the African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbird Agreement (AEWA),” said Bert Lenten, Executive Secretary of AEWA, an international wildlife treaty administered by UNEP.


“It brings together for the first time some of the most current and comprehensive information available internationally on the species and the sites they use,” he added. “To target conservation efforts effectively, access to reliable information about the critical sites that migratory waterbirds depend upon, and the ecological requirements of these species, is key,” Lenten stressed.


Marco Lambertini, Chief Executive of BirdLife International, said the CSN identifies priority sites for the protection of migratory waterbirds and highlights knowledge gaps, revealing that many stop-over and non-breeding localities were still not well known.


“Only by combining adequate knowledge, targeted action, appropriate funding and local capacity on the ground will we be able to make a difference for migratory species,” he added.


The tool, whose development was partly funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), an international environment financing organization, provides comprehensive information on 294 waterbird species from 3,020 sites. It is designed to make information easily available on the most important sites for migratory waterbirds, both at the national and international level.


In a related development, new conservation plans for the Siberian crane have been endorsed to save the species from extinction, UNEP reported during a meeting of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS) in Bonn on Monday.


“During the International Year of Biodiversity, CMS continues to protect this majestic bird and its wetland habitats that are critical to humans and species alike,” said CMS Executive Secretary Elizabeth Maruma Mrema. “Not only [do] these ecosystems supply drinking water, but they act as a flood defence and as carbon sink to mitigate climate change,” she added.


During its annual migration the Siberian crane travels 5,000 kilometres from its breeding grounds in western Siberia and Yakutia, intermediate resting and feeding places, to its wintering sites in southern China and Iran.


In the course of these journeys along three migration routes, called flyways, they overcome considerable obstacles such as high mountains and vast deserts. Major threats such as hunting in West and Central Asia and the drainage of critical wetlands in East Asia put them at an even greater risk. Only 3,000 to 3,500 birds remain globally.


Conservation efforts include the launch earlier this year of the Siberian Crane Wetland Project (SCWP) with a $10.3 million financing from GEF, which was initiated to make the journey of Siberian cranes and other waterbirds safer through securing major waterbird habitats.


The project has succeeded in safeguarding a network of 16 critical wetlands for waterbirds in China, Iran, Kazakhstan and Russia while securing water flows to sustain wetland ecosystem services including supplying purified water to millions of people in the Eurasian region, according to UNEP.


An expansion of the critical site network and infrastructure established during the development of the SCWP will now be applied to hot spots in 11 countries that are signatories to UNEP’s Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS).


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