Geologic map of the Boise City 30  X 60  quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma




Скачать 29.79 Kb.
НазваниеGeologic map of the Boise City 30  X 60  quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma
Дата19.09.2012
Размер29.79 Kb.
ТипДокументы
Geologic map of the Boise City 30 X 60 quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma


Frequently asked questions:

  • What does the data describe?

  • How should the data be cited?

  • What geographic area does the data cover?

  • What does it look like?

  • Does the data describe conditions during a particular time period?

  • How are geographic features stored in the data?

  • What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?

  • How does the data describe geographic features?

  • Who are the originators of the data?

  • Who also contributed to the data?

  • To whom should users address questions about the data?

  • Why was the data created?

  • From what previous works were the data drawn?

  • How were the data generated, processed, and modified?

  • How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data?

  • Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?

  • Who distributes the data?

  • What's the catalog number I need to order the data?

  • What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?

  • How can I download or order the data?

  • Who wrote the metadata?



What does the data describe?

Title: Geologic map of the Boise City 30 X 60quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma.


Abstract: The geologic map of the Boise City quadrangle was compiled from existing, previously published geologic maps (listed on map and below) and from field reconnaissance by the authors. The reconnaissance geology was compiled onto modern 7.5topographic quadrangles; the geology was subsequently digitized for ultimate publication at a scale of 1:100,000. This map was published originally as Open-File Report OF17-2003. The map has been transferred from Open-File Reports to Oklahoma Geologic Quadrangle Maps and now revised and published as Oklahoma Geologic Quadrangle OGQ-43.


How should the data be cited?


Luza, Kenneth V.; and Fay, Robert O., 2003, Geologic map of the Boise City 30 X 60 quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma: Oklahoma Geological Survey Oklahoma Geologic Quadrangle OGQ-43, scale 1:100,000.

What geographic area does the data cover?

West Bounding Coordinate: -103.00

East Bounding Coordinate: -102.00

North Bounding Coordinate: 37.00

South Bounding Coordinate: 36.50

What does it look like?

A PDF of the published geologic map, a zipped (ZIP) file containing all the geologic map features in an ESRI shapefile format, and a metadata document

Does the data describe conditions during a particular time period?

Calendar Date: 2003

Currentness Reference: Publication date

How are geographic features stored in the data?

PDF and ESRI shapefile format

What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?

Grid Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator

UTM Zone: 13N

Scale Factor at Central Meridian: 0.99960

Longitude of Central Meridian: -99.00

Latitude of Projection Origin: 0.00

False Easting: 500000.00

False Northing: 0.00

Planar Coordinates: Meters

Horizontal Datum: North American Datum 1927 (NAD27)
Ellipsoid: Clarke 1866
Semi-Major Axis of the Ellipsoid: 6378206.40
Flattening of the Ellipsoid: 1/294.9786980

How does the data describe geographic features?

The published geologic map of the Boise City 30 X 60 quadrangle uses a digital U.S. Geological Survey 1:100,000 topographic base map, where symbols and line work are the same as those found on the published U.S. Geological Survey 1:100,000 paper topographic map for the quadrangle. Geologic symbols and line work are shown in the explanation on the map. Structural information and how the areal extent of geologic units is shown, also are typical of geologic maps published by the USGS and other state geological surveys. The PDF file is a digital representation of a paper geologic map and all the topographic and geologic symbols are the same as those used on commonly used and widely accessible federal- and state-survey-produced geologic maps. The geologic symbols conform closely, but not exact in every case, to the FGDC Digital Cartographic Standard for Geologic Map Symbolization. The ESRI shapefiles of the geologic map can be symbolized by the user to represent the published map or other geologic standards.

Who are the originators of the data?

Geologists: Kenneth V. Luza and Robert O. Fay

Digital Cartographer: G. Russell Standridge

Who also contributed to the data?

Manager of OGS Cartographic Section: James H. Anderson

To whom should users address questions about the data?

Kenneth V. Luza

Oklahoma Geological Survey

100 E. Boyd St., Rm. N-131

Norman, Oklahoma 73019

Phone: (405) 325-3031

Fax: (405) 325-7069

E-mail: kluza@ou.edu

Why was the data created?

The data was created to provide a geologic map of the Boise City 30 X 60 quadrangle. The map or any parts of it can be printed or viewed at a variety of scales and be used in many ways by homeowners, landowners, civil engineers, land-use planners, government agencies, businesses, etc. This map data is not meant to be used or displayed at any scale larger than 1:100,000 (e.g., 1:62,500 or 1:24,000).

From what previous works were the data drawn?

Barnes, V.E., 1984, Geologic Atlas of Texas, Dalhart Sheet: Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas, Austin, 1 sheet, scale 1:250,000.

Rockroth, E.P., 1923, Geology of Cimarron County, Oklahoma: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin 34, 107 p.

Sapik, D.B.; and Geomeat, R.L., 1973, Reconnaissance of the ground water resources of Cimarron County, Oklahoma: U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Atlas HA-373, 3 sheets, scale 1:125,000.

Schoff, S.L., 1943, Geology and ground water resources of Cimarron County, Oklahoma: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin 64, 317 p.

__________, 1939, Geology and ground water resources of Texas County, Oklahoma: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin 59, 248 p.

Stovall, J.W., 1943, Plate II, Geologic map of northwestern Cimarron County, in Schoff, S.L., 1943, Geology and ground water resources of Cimarron County, Oklahoma: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin 64, 317 p.

How were the data generated, processed, and modified?


The geology from previously published maps was redrawn by hand onto 32 modern 7.5 topographic maps. Differences in geologic contacts and distribution of geologic units were noted. The 7.5 topographic maps were taken into the field and used as the base maps for revising the geology of the area. The geologists field checked all the geologic contacts and distribution of units and, where necessary, modified or reinterpreted previously published data. In general, most of the field checking was done in areas that were readily accessible by vehicles; contacts and units were then projected to those areas that were not checked directly.


The geology was digitized at a scale of 1:24,000 from revisions drawn on 32 modern 7.5 topographic maps with each map unit as a separate layer in an ESRI shapefile format. All shapefiles are then assembled together and overlain by a USGS 1:100,000-scale topographic base map and checked for errors. Symbology and labels were designated for a final map layout at 1:100,000 scale. The final map was then converted to a PDF and published on a CD as Open-File Report OF17-2003.


OF17-2003 has been transferred to new map series called Oklahoma Geologic Quadrangle Maps. This new series offers digital data download via the OGS website. All quadrangle maps in this new series were reviewed and edited for continuity and consistency. OF17-2003 became published as Oklahoma Geologic Quadrangle OGQ-43 as a PDF along with the data files in ESRI shapefile format.

How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data?

The geologic map is based on reconnaissance field checking of previously existing geologic maps and interpretation by the authors. Most of the contacts bordering Quaternary units are gradational. The contact between the Ogallala Formation and adjacent units is typically gradational or uncertain, particularly where the Ogallala consists of sand, silt, and gravel and the adjacent unit is predominantly sand, silt, and/or gravel. The distinction between “Cover Sand” and “Cover Loess” is based solely on the report by the Soil Conservation Service. The distinction between these units was not noted in the field by the authors of this map. Much work remains to be done concerning the distribution and origin of the different rock types that make up the Ogallala Formation. The distribution and age of several volcanic ash deposits in the Ogallala Formation could be used to help organize rock strata into units on the basis of their age or time of origin. The origin, distribution, and age of the basalt that caps Black Mesa need additional study. The Kiowa Shale and Cheyenne Sandstone need to be divided into separate map units. Correlation and documentation of Triassic strata in the Oklahoma Panhandle also requires additional study.


The format of the data as an ESRI shapefile was originally used as a cartographic tool for constructing a printable map. The map was digitized at a scale of 1:24,000 from 7.5topographic maps. Errors may exist from the digitizing process done at that scale and transferring the geology onto a 1:100,000-scale 30 X 60 topographic quadrangle. This may include errors in relation to the locational accuracy and precision of: the contact or map unit boundary to the topographic contour; a map unit layer to another map unit layer (e.g., gaps, overlaps, slivers, overshoots). These data and adjoining data for other quadrangles were produced on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Therefore, misalignment issues may exist between these data and other data downloaded for adjoining quadrangles. Also, the attribute table for each geologic feature layer may not contain detailed information except when used for categorizing some feature objects. Specific information about each geologic unit can be found in the Description of Units on the published PDF map. Currently underway, these issues are being resolved for each quadrangle map through revision and implementation of a geologic data model based on an ESRI geodatabase environment. These revised data files will be available for download on the OGS website in the future. Finally, some geologic contacts abruptly end at a water body as mapped by the authors; therefore, a Water layer is included that represents an open water contact.


Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?


Access Constraints: None


Use Constraints: This digital map is not meant to be used or displayed at any scale greater than 1:100,000. Users should cite the Oklahoma Geological Survey as the original source of the data, but clearly denote cases where the original data has been updated, modified, or in any way altered from the original condition. There are no restrictions on the distribution of the data or interpretations shown on this data or reproduction of the data from the graphics files. However, users are encouraged to refer others to the Oklahoma Geological Survey to acquire the original data or any updated versions of the data.

Who distributes the data?

Oklahoma Geological Survey

100 E. Boyd St., Rm. N-131

Norman, OK 73019

What's the catalog number I need to download the data?

Oklahoma Geologic Quadrangle OGQ-43.

What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS) provides these geologic data “as is”. The OGS makes no guarantee or warranty concerning the accuracy of information contained in the data. The OGS further makes no warranties, either expressed or implied, as to any other matter whatsoever including, without limitation, the condition of the product, or its fitness for any particular purpose. The burden for determining fitness for use lies entirely with the user. Although these data have been processed successfully on computers at the OGS, no warranty, expressed or implied, is made by the OGS regarding the use of these data on any other system, nor does the fact of distribution constitute or imply any such warranty.

In no event shall the OGS have any liability whatsoever for payment of any consequential, incidental, indirect, special, or tort damages of any kind, including, but not limited to, any loss of profits arising out of use of or reliance on the geologic data or arising out of the delivery, installation, operation, or support by OGS.

This digital geologic map of the Boise City 30 X 60 quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma is not meant to be used or displayed at any scale larger than 1:100,000.

How can I download or order the data?

Availability in Digital Form:

Data Format:

PDF and ESRI shapefile

Free Download at:

Oklahoma Geological Survey website

http://www.ogs.ou.edu/geolmapping.php

Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:

Last Modified: June 2008


Metadata Author:

Oklahoma Geological Survey

c/o Kenneth V. Luza and/or G. Russell Standridge

100 E. Boyd St., Rm. N-131

Norman, OK 73019

Phone (405) 325-3031

Fax (405) 325-7069



Похожие:

Geologic map of the Boise City 30  X 60  quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma iconGeologic map of the Elk City 30  X 60  quadrangle, Beckham, Custer, Greer, Harmon, Kiowa, Roger Mills, and Washita Counties, Oklahoma

Geologic map of the Boise City 30  X 60  quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma iconGeologic map of the Oklahoma part of the Burkburnett 30  X 60  quadrangle, Comanche, Cotton, Jefferson, Stephens, and Tillman Counties, Oklahoma

Geologic map of the Boise City 30  X 60  quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma iconGeologic map of the Catoosa 5 quadrangle, Rogers and Wagoner, Counties, Oklahoma

Geologic map of the Boise City 30  X 60  quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma iconPhilosophical and operational guidelines for developing a north american science-language standard for digital geologic-map databases

Geologic map of the Boise City 30  X 60  quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma iconOklahoma city community college

Geologic map of the Boise City 30  X 60  quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma iconThe Oklahoma City Bombing and the Politics of Terror

Geologic map of the Boise City 30  X 60  quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma iconTexas City Independent School District

Geologic map of the Boise City 30  X 60  quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma iconРуководство пользователя Программный комплекс формирования топографических планов в виде цифровых моделей в среде Autodesk Map
Приложение Связь TopoMap (Autodesk Map R14) c приложением Autodesk Map Land Development Desktop 73
Geologic map of the Boise City 30  X 60  quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma iconAbbott, J. C., K. W. Stewart, and S. R. Moulton, II. 1997. Aquatic insects of the Big Thicket region of East Texas. Texas Journal of Science 49: 35-50

Geologic map of the Boise City 30  X 60  quadrangle, Cimarron and Texas Counties, Oklahoma iconA collaborative effort of the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired And Texas Commission for the Blind Winter 2003 volume 8, No, 1

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница