The purpose of the new ba honours course in English, under the semester system, is to provide a thorough grounding in literature written in the English




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5. English Literature 1830-1900 Eng/PG/1.1.5

A. Fiction

1. One novel by Dickens

2. One novel by George Eliot

3. One novel by W.M. Thackeray / Wilkie Collins / George Gissing / Samuel Butler / Thomas Hardy / Nathaniel Hawthorne / Herman Melville


B. Poetry

Selections from the poetry of Alfred Lord Tennyson, the Brownings, Matthew Arnold, the Rosettis, Charlotte Mew, William Morris, George Meredith


C. Prose

Selections from the porse of Matthew Arnold, Thomas Carlyle, Henry Mayhew, William Morris, John Ruskin


Recommended reading:

Friedrich Engels, The Working Class in Manchester 1884.

Karl Marx and Freidrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto

G.M. Young, Victorian England: Portrait of an Age

E.P. Thompson, The Making of the English Working Class

E.H. Hobsbawm, Industry and Empire

T.B. Macaulay, Minute on Education in India 1835

Charles Darwin, Origin of Species


6. English Literature 1900-2000 Eng/PG/2.1.6

A. Fiction

1. One novel by Joseph Conrad

2. One Novel by James Joyce

3. One novel by Graham Greene / William Faulkner / John Fowles / Ralph Ellison


B. Drama

1. One play by George Bernard Shaw

2. One play by Harold Pinter / Tom Stoppard / Edward Bond / Edward Albee


C. Poetry

Selections from the poetry of T.S. Eliot, W.H. Auden, Stephen Spender, Langston Hughes, Seamus Heaney


D. Non-fictional Prose

Selections from the work of English and American writers


Recommended reading:

Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness

Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams

Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents

Robert Graves, Goodbye to All That

Albert Einstein, The World As I See It

Virginia Woolf, 'Modern Fiction' in The Common Reader

Henrik Ibsen, A Doll's House and Ghosts

Anton Chekhov, The Cherry Orchard

Samuel Hynes, The Auden Generation

Stephen Spender, The Struggle of the Moderns

Ellman and Feidelson (eds) The Modern Tradition: Backgrounds of Modern Literature

Ellman and Butler, The Modern Tradition

Leon Edel, The Psychological Novel

Malcolm Bradbury and James McFarlane (eds) Modernism

Robert Humphrey, Stream of Consciousness and the Modern Novel

Edmund Wilson, Axel's Castle


7. Postcolonial English Literature Eng/PG/2.2.7

A. Themes, Issues, Backgrounds

This section will cover readings of history and basic essays on the issues related to it, such as Gandhi, Nehru, Fanon, Ngugi, Selections from the Postcolonial Reader (ed. Ashcroft, Griffth, Tiffin)


B. Early Works

From novels by Raja Rao, Jean Rhys, Alan Paton


C. Constructing the Nation

From novels and/or plays by Ngugi wa Thiongo, Wole Soyinka, George Lamming, Salman Rushdie


D. Literature from Settler Colonies

Selections of poems and novels by Patrick White, Margaret Atwood, J.M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, and selections from 'native' writers.


E. Diaspora

Novels by V.S. Naipaul, Amy Tan, Hanif Kureishi, Michael Ondaatje


F. Beyond the Nation

The work of Ama Ata Aidoo, Amitav Ghosh, selection of short stories and poems from Postcolonial Literatures in English ed. John Thieme


Suggested reading:

Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism

K.W. Appiah, In My Father's House: Africa in the Philosophy of Culture

Homi Bhaba, ed. Nation and Narration

W. Harris, Tradition, The Writer and Society

G. Lamming, The Pleasures of Exile

Meenakshi Mukherjee, The Twice-Born Fiction: Themes and Techniques of the Indian Novel in English

Edward Said, Orientalism

Wole Soyinka, Myth, Literature and the African World


8. Literary Theory and Cultural Studies Eng/PG/2.1.8

Topics

The Nature of Literary Theory

Classical Literary Theory and the notion of mimesis. Poetry as false knowledge: Plato

Classical Literary Theory and the notions of structure and form. The ends of poetry: Aristotle.

Renaissance Neoclassicism and the issues of pleasure and profit. History, philosophy and poetry: Castelvetro and Sidney.

The Consolidation of Neoclassicism: nature, judgement and decorum in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: Dryden, Boileau and Johnson

German aesthetic theory. Poetry and the other arts: Lessing. The poet and the world: Schiller.

Varieties of English Romanticism. Imagination and feeling: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley

Reactions to Romantic egoism: Arnold, Eliot, Richards. 'Romantic' literary history: Bloom.

Fictional representation: constituting and dissolving selves: James, Woolf.

Fictional representation: History, society, dialogue: Lukacs, Bakhtin

Linguistics and structuralism: Saussure, Jakobson, Barthes

Dissolving subjects: Derrida, Lacan

Interrogating discourses: Foucault, Said, feminist theories


Recommended reading:

The Cambridge History of Criticism, relevant volumes

D.A. Russell and M. Winterbottom, eds, Ancient Literary Criticism

A.H. Gilbert, ed. Literary Criticism: Plato to Dryden

David Simpson, ed., The Origins of Modern Critical Thought

K. Wheeler, D. Simpson, H. Nisbet, eds, German Aesthetic and Literary Criticism 3 vols.

Rene Wellek, A History of Modern Criticism

Hazard Adams and Leroy Searle, eds, Critical Theory Since 1965

David Lodge, ed., Modern Criticism and Theory: A Reader


OPTIONAL COURSES


Note: Not all of these courses will be offered in any given semester. The choice of courses to be offered will depend on the convenience of teachers and the interest shown by students, with the provision that all major areas must be covered.


Cluster A: Medieval and Renaissance English Literature

  1. Old English Poetry and Prose Eng/PG/A1

Close reading of selected texts from Sweet's Anglo-Saxon Reader, revised by D. Whitelock, and other selections. Also, a study of the general literary and social background of the period. Basic elements of the language too will be considered.


  1. Old English Grammar Eng/PG/A2

A study of the major points of OE phonology, accidence, vocabulary, syntax and dialectology.


  1. Early Middle English Literature Eng/PG/A3

Close reading of selected prose and verse texts of the period c.1100-c.1350, and the literary and social background. Also, the language of the various selected texts.


  1. The Pilgrimage in Medieval Literature Eng/PG/A4

This course will examine the centrality of the pilgrimage in Medieval life and literature. It will look first at the idea of the pilgrimage in the Old Testament and especially the New Testament Emmaus pilgrimage. One would read Deguileville, Lydgate, Boccaccio etc in translation where necessary and the works of Chaucer and Langland looking at least as far forward as Bunyan if not to the present day.


  1. Medieval Drama Eng/PG/A5

This course will introduce students to the rise of drama in medieval Europe. It will cover selected English Mystery and Miracle Plays as well as European cognates.


  1. Dream in Medieval Literature Eng/PG/A6

On this course students will be expected to study prototypes of the dream from Classical and Biblical sources, medieval ones like the Roman de la Rose, others from hagiographical texts. From here they will move to medieval dream poems in English where the dream frames narrative poems and also examine dreams mentioned or described in the course of the narrative poems.


  1. Arthurian Romance Eng/PG/A7

The Arthurian legends; French and British traditions; the rise of romance; reading of one text from Malory, one from Chretien de Troyes, Gawain and the Green Knight, The Quest of the Holy Grail.


  1. Chaucer Eng/PG/A8

This course will offer students the opportunity to specialise in the work of Chaucer, focussing on historical and social background, language, poetic forms and a close study of selected texts.


  1. Petrarch and the Renaissance Eng/PG/A9

This course will examine the poetry and literary influences of Petrarch, whose work inaugurates in many important ways the cultural and historical movement known as the Renaissance. It will include close examination of texts while also considering the history of ideas, forms and motifs.


  1. Humanism Eng/PG/A10

This course will attempt to define the contours of the complex and wide-ranging European pedagogic and cultural enterprise known as Humanism. It will begin by looking at the thought and influence of the earliest European humanists, professional scholars and teachers located mainly in Italy, and then consider the spread of the movement all over Europe, especially through the influence of figures such as Erasmus. The association of this pedagogic enterprise with philosophical, cultural and literary achievements, as well as its social and intellectual prestige, will be examined.


  1. Renaissance Epic Eng/PG/A11

This course will examine the mixed form of Renaissance epic, focussing on exemplary instances of chivalric or romantic epic such as those written by Ariosto, Tasso and Spenser. It will also take into account other Renaissance endeavours int eh epic form, such as those by Ronsard, Vida or Du Bartas, looking ahead to the summit of Renaissance epic composition as achieved in the poetry of Milton. It will relate texts not only to contemporary history and culture, but also to Renaissance theories of heroic and epic poetry, such as that provided by Tasso's Discourses on the Heroic Poem.


  1. Renaissance Art Eng/PG/A12

This course will introduce students to the major achievements of Renaissance art and artists. While taking students through a history of the development of styles of modes of representation as well as technical innovations, it may also consider art theory, iconography, analogies between the visual and the verbal, and the larger contexts of society, culture, patronage and the market.


  1. The Protestant Reformation Eng/PG/A13

Course components: Reform and reformation: late medieval religion; humanism and the reformation; study of major ideas of Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, Arminius; the radical reformation; literature and reformation thought. Suggested reading: selections from major Reformation texts in H.J. Hillerbrand, The Protestant Reformation.


  1. Renaissance Political Thought Eng/PG/A14

Course components: Overview of classical and medieval political theory; early humanism; the vir virtutis; Machiavelli, fortune and virtue; the state of nature and the social contract; Protestant and reformed political theory. Suggested background reading: The Foundations of Modern Political Thought, 2 vols; J.G.A. Pollock, The Machiavellian Moment.


  1. Renaissance Drama Excluding Shakespeare Eng/PG/A15

Any two plays from each of groups A and B and one play from group C shall be offered to each batch, making a total of five plays:

Group A

Thomas Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy

Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus (Versions: A & B)

John Webster, The White Devil

John Ford, 'Tis Pity She's a Whore


Group B

John Lyly, Endymion or Campaspe

Ben Jonson, Epicene or Volpone

Thomas Middleton and Thomas Dekker, The Roaring Girl

Thomas Middleton, A Chaste Maid in Cheapside


Group C

John Fletcher, The Wild Goose Chase or Philander

Ben Jonson, Oberon: The Faery Prince, The Golden Age Restored, Love's Triumph Through Callipolis

A knowledge of practices in the playhouse and printing-house of the time, and an acquaintance with the history of the early modern English theatre would be expected. Recommended for reference: A.R. Braunmuller and Michael Hattaway, eds, The Cambridge Companion to English Renaissance Drama (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990)


  1. Shakespeare Eng/PG/A16

a) Shakespeare's life and professional career

b) Shakespeare's texts, canon and chronology

c) Shakespeare's theatre: architecture, audience, patronage, regulation

d) Shakespeare scholarship and criticism (select study of editions, schools, etc)

e) Shakespeare in India: curriculum, performance, translation (historical study of select instances)


  1. Donne Eng/PG/A17

This will be a specialized course on the poetry and prose writings of John Donne, examining his career, his secular and religious writings, and his place in the culture of late sixteenth and early seventeenth century England. Students will be expected to read most of Donne's major work in its social and historical context.


  1. Revenge Tragedy Eng/PG/A18

This course will treat the development of the Revenge genre, from its classical beginnings (Oresteia, Seneca's Thyestes etc) to its specific manifestations in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. It will involve a close study of dramatists like Kyd (The Spanish Tragedy) Shakespeare (Titus Andronicus and Hamlet), Tourneur (The Revenger's Tragedy), Webster (The White Devil and Duchess of Malfi) Ford (The Broken Heart) focussing on themes of family, kinship. honour codes, feudalism, Christianity, notions of masculinity etc.


  1. Science, Poetry and Politics in the Renaissance Eng/PG/A19

This option will focus on the advancements in astronomy, medicine and other sciences in the Renaissance as well as some of the pseudo-sciences allied with these fields. The course will draw attention to the debates that arose as a result, and at the way in which this entire intellectual ferment is reflected in the poetry of Milton, Marvell, Donne and others.


  1. Women and the Renaissance Eng/PG/A20

The course will examine the following issues:

a) Did women have a renaissance? Examining Joan Kelly's question through a study of the debates about women in the different discourses of politics, religion, education, marriage and family, medicine etc.

b) Representations of women in men's literature/ feminist rereadings of drama, romances, masques, lyrics and satire. This section will introduce students to the vast body of feminist readings of Renaissance texts.

c) Women in the Visual Arts: representations of women's bodies, the iconography of Queen Elizabeth etc.

d) Women's writings: a study of women authors like Mary Sidney, Queen Elizabeth, Isabella Whitney, Aemilia Lanyer, Elizabeth Carey, Mary Wroth and others. This section will also examine how certain genres were appropriated and feminized by women.

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