Foundation Degree in Animal Management and Welfare




НазваниеFoundation Degree in Animal Management and Welfare
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Section 2: Module Synopsis


This unit introduces students to the functions of the principal mammalian physiological systems, to include the neuromuscular, renal and hepatic, respiratory, cardiovascular and endocrine systems, and examines their roles in maintaining overall organism homeostasis and in the coordination and regulation of mammalian activities.


Section 3: Outline Syllabus

The unit will include: An introduction to cell theory and physiology at the cellular level.

Nervous Systems; organisation of the central and peripheral nervous systems, nervous cell biology, generation and transmission of nerve impulses and the processes of muscle contraction.

Endocrine Systems including hormone classification and modes of action with particular reference to the role of the hypothalamus

Respiratory and Cardiovascular Systems considering mechanisms and control of breathing and gas exchange, the structure and function of the heart and regulation of the cardiac cycle and how the organs work at a cellular level.

Digestive and Excretory Systems looking at regulation of water balance, blood pressure and volume, the processes of digestion and absorption, structure and function of the liver and detoxification and excretion mechanisms


Section 4: Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit the student will be able to:

Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of homeostasis and its importance in the functioning and regulation of physiological systems.

Understand the basic principles of physiological communication systems and their role in the coordination of the activities of different organ systems.

Describe the basic structures and functioning of the major physiological systems.

Understand how tissues and organs work on a cellular level.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/Methods

Students will achieve their learning outcomes through participation in lectures, seminars, practicals and dissections. Tutorials will be used to consolidate and expand information delivered in lectures and practical classes. Students will be encouraged to carry out their own research.


Section 6: Assessment

Assessment will have three components:

A written essay (25%);

Continuous practical assessment (25%);

A time-constrained examination (50%).


Section 7: Relationship to Professional Body

None

Section 8: Indicative Reading

Berne, R.M. and Levy, M.N. (1998) Physiology. 4th edition. London: Mosby. ISBN 0815 109 520.

Clancy, J., McVicar, A.J. (2002) Physiology and anatomy. A homeostatic approach (2nd edition). Arnold Publishing. ISBN 034 076 239

Cunningham, J.G. (1992). Textbook of veterinary physiology. Philadelphia, USA: Saunders. ISBN 0721 623 069.

Eckert, R. et al. (1997) Eckert animal physiology: mechanisms and adaptations. 4th edition. San Francisco, USA, W.H. Freeman. ISBN 071 672 4146.

Kapit, W., Macey, R.I. and Meisami, E. (1987) The Physiology Coloring Book. New York, USA: HarperCollins. ISBN 0060 434 791.

Kay, I. (1998) Introduction to animal physiology. Oxford, BIOS Scientific Publishers.

ISBN 185 996 0464.

Marshall, P.T. and Hughes, G.M. (1980) Physiology of mammals and other vertebrates. 2nd edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521 226 333.

Schmidt-Nielsen, K. (1997) Animal physiology: adaptation and environment. 5th edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521 570 980.

Swenson, M.J., Reece, W.O. (1993) Dukes’ physiology of domestic animals. 11th edition.

Ithaca, USA, Comstock. ISBN 080 142 8041.

Tortora, G.J. and Grabowski, S.R. (1996) Principles of anatomy and physiology. 8th edition. New York, USA: HarperCollins. ISBN 0673 993 54x.

Withers, P.C. (1992) Comparative animal physiology. Fort Worth, USA: Saunders College. ISBN 0030 128 471.


Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Comparative Anatomy


Faculty

Health Life and Social Sciences


Department

Biological Sciences


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

Animal Behaviour Science

Animal Management and Welfare

Bio-veterinary Science

Certificate in Health Science (Veterinary Medicine and Science)

Conservation Biology

Equine Science

Equine Sports Science


Code:

Bioxxx


Credit Rating:


15


Level:


1


Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


K. Lord



Section 2: Module Synopsis

This unit is concerned with developing an understanding of the principles of anatomy across taxa. It aims to explore anatomical adaptations across taxa within the animal kingdom and so provide insight into their basic anatomy. Through this, an understanding of anatomically distinct and shared features across animal species will be developed. On completion of this unit students will have developed skills that will allow them to appreciate the anatomical adaptations that have evolved for the success of different species. The unit provides a foundation for further study in zoology or veterinary anatomy.


Section 3: Outline Syllabus


The basis of classification

The tools used to classify organisms. The relationships that allow comparison between taxa

Invertebrate anatomy

The relevance of invertebrate adaptation and the limitations of skeletal systems. Symbiotic adaptations between invertebrates and their vertebrate hosts.

The body plan

The basic design of the vertebrate body plans

Tissue types

Microscopic structure and function of various tissues

Skeletal design

Comparing skeletal variations between species

Locomotive adaptations

Joint types and mechanics of movement

Digestive adaptations

Variations in the GI tract between species

Nervous system

Sensory organs and basic CNS design


Section 4: Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge (including basic recall of taxonomic feautures), understanding (e.g. structure and function) as well as analytical insight (e.g. species adaptation) applicable to: The process of classification., Invertebrate anatomy and adaptation

Vertebrate classification and body plan and Anatomical systems of the vertebrates including, e.g. skeletal, digestive, nervous, muscular, hepatic, renal, circulatory


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/Methods

The unit syllabus will be covered through a programme of lectures, practical sessions, visits and seminars.. Students will be encouraged to carry out their own research.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment will be in two parts:

Completion of written coursework (50%); and

An unseen examination/phase test (50%).


Section 7: Relationship to Professional Body

None


Section 8: Indicative Reading

Frandson, R.D. and Spurgeon, T.L. (1992). Anatomy and physiology of farm animals. 5th edition. Philadelphia, USA: Lea and Febiger. ISBN 0812 114 353.

Wake, M.H. (ed.) (1992) Hyman’s comparative vertebrate anatomy. 3rd edition. Chicago, University of Chicago Press. ISBN 022 687 0138.

Withers, P.C. (1992) Comparative animal physiology. Fort Worth, Saunders College. ISBN 003 012 8471.


Other texts that may be useful to read are:

Kettle, D.S. (2000). Medical and veterinary entomology, New York, CABI,

ISBN 0851989683

Lawrence, E., Henderson, I.F. (1994) Henderson’s dictionary of biological terms. 12th edition. Harlow, Prentice Hall. ISBN 058 241 4989.

Tortora, G.J., Grabowski, S.R. (1996) Principles of anatomy and physiology. 8th edition. New York, HarperCollins. ISBN 067 399 354x.


Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Conservation Biology


Faculty

Health, Life & Social Sciences


Department

Biological Sciences


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

Animal Management & Welfare

Conservation Biology

Code:

Bioxxx

Credit Rating:


15


Level:


1


Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


J. Clohesy



Section 2: Module Synopsis

This is an introduction to the principles of conservation of biodiversity. It emphasises the interdisciplinary nature of the subject and emphasises the topicality and dynamic nature of conservation biology.


Section 3: Outline Syllabus

The multidisciplinary nature of conservation biology and the contributions it receives from other sciences

Ecological principles relevant to practical conservation

Exploitation and extinction

Genetic principles relevant to conservation biology

Relevance of animal behaviour to conservation biology


The nature and value of biodiversity and the threats that face it

Biological diversity, its extent and location

Genetic resources

Economic valuation of biodiversity

Sustainable utilisation of biodiversity


Application of the principles of conservation biology at environment, habitat, species and population levels

International regulation

Effectiveness of protected areas

Protection of species

Conservation biology in relation to world events and national developments

Conservation of within-species diversity


Practicalities and management implications of conservation inside and outside protected areas and the roles of in situ and ex situ conservation

In situ compared with ex situ conservation

Management of populations for conservation

Cryo-conservation

Conflicts


Section 4: Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit the student will be able to:

Explain the multidisciplinary nature of conservation biology and the contributions it receives from other sciences

Analyse using global information sources the nature and value of biodiversity and the threats that face it

Trace how the principles of conservation biology are applied at environment, habitat, species and population levels

Evaluate the practicalities and management implications of conservation inside and outside protected areas and the roles of in situ and ex situ conservation


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/Methods

Students will achieve their learning outcomes through participation in lectures, seminars, practical sessions and visits. Students will be encouraged to carry out their own research, which will include data handling exercises and review of newspaper/ magazine articles and web based material.


Section 6: Assessment

Assessment will be in two parts:

Completion of written coursework (50%);

Examination (50%);


Section 7: Relationship to Professional Body

Not applicable.


Section 8: Indicative Reading

Lecturer will advise students of recent publications, reliable current electronic sources, and new editions of books

Lecturer will advise students of recent publications, reliable current electronic sources, and new editions of books

Primack, R.B. (2002). Essentials of conservation biology. Sunderland, Mass.: Sinauer. ISBN 087 893 7196

Pullin, A.S. (2002). Conservation biology. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. ISBN 052 164 4828

Journals

BBC Wildlife, New Scientist, quality daily press.

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Evolution, Genetics and Domestication


Faculty

Health, Life and Social Sciences


Department

Biological Sciences


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

Animal Behaviour Science
Animal Management and Welfare
Conservation Biology
Equine Science


Code:

Bioxxx

Credit Rating:


15


Level:


1


Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


F. Owen



Section 2: Module Synopsis

This unit introduces students to the basic concepts and scope of evolutionary biology.


Section 3: Outline Syllabus

Evolution – the evidence

Evidence of evolution – from the past

Evidence of evolution – from the present

History of evolutionary ideas

Biological basis of evolution

Genes in populations

Testing biological hypotheses using molecular genetics

Selfish genes and other new views of evolution

Evolution in nature

Natural selection

Sexual selection

Genetic drift and population factors

Overview

Inheritance and gene transfer

Mendelian inheritance,

autosomal and sex linked genes,

dominant and recessive alleles,

multiple alleles,

recombination and linkage,

mapping of chromosomes,

polygenic inheritance,

heritability and gene frequencies.

Topics in evolution

Relationship with environment

Co-evolution and optimisation

Speciation and extinction

Experiments on evolution

Domestication and breed differentiation

Domestication as a biological and cultural process

Artificial selection

Diversification of breeds

Utilisation of breeds


Section 4: Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit the student will be able to:

Explain evolutionary processes and illustrate these with appropriate evidence

Understand the operation of evolutionary processes in nature and how these can be demonstrated

Describe how evolution explains biological diversity and functionality

Appreciate the evolutionary processes that have operated in domestication and the development of breeds, and their ethical implications


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/Methods

Students will achieve their learning outcomes through participation in lectures, seminars and practical classes. Students will be encouraged to carry out their own research.


Section 6: Assessment

Assessment will be in two parts.

Completion of written coursework (50%)

Examination (50%).


Section 7: Relationship to Professional Body

Not applicable.


Section 8: Indicative Reading

Lecturer will advise students of recent publications, reliable current electronic sources, and new editions of books

Beebee, T., Rowe, G. (2007). An introduction to molecular ecology. Oxford, Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-929205-9.

Bromham, L. (2008). Reading the story in DNA. A beginner’s guide to molecular evolution. Oxford, Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-929091-8.

Clutton-Brock, J. (1999). A natural history of domesticated mammals. 2nd edition. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. ISBN 052 163 4954

Hall, S.J.G., Clutton-Brock, J. (1995). Two hundred years of British farm livestock (paperback edition). London, British Museum (Natural History) / HMSO. ISBN 0-11-310055-8.


Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Introduction to Animal Behaviour


Faculty

Health, Life and Social Sciences


Department

Biological Sciences


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

Conservation Biology

Animal Behaviour Science

Animal Management & Welfare


Code:

Bioxxx


Credit Rating:


15


Level:


One


Pre-requisites:


None


Co-requisites:


None


Barred Combinations:


None


Module Co-ordinator:


F. Owen



Section 2: Module Synopsis

This unit aims to introduce the student to the fundamental principles underlying animal behaviour. It will introduce the notion that there are several levels of explanation of an animal’s behaviour (Tinbergen’s four questions). From here proximate and ultimate explanations will be developed so that the student understands behaviour in terms of 1) genes and evolution and 2) learning and environmental feedback. In addition students will be taught how to observe and record the behaviour of animals from a wide range of taxonomic groups and how to calculate and present summary statistics of their observations.


Section 3: Outline Syllabus

This unit will focus on Tinbergen’s four questions – essentially, the explanation of behaviour in relation to function, causation, development and evolutionary history.

The survival value (or function) of behaviour - Here the basic principles of behavioural ecology will be introduced along with the concept of ‘genes for behaviour’.

The development of behaviour - How the development of behaviour from embryo to adult involves a continual interaction between the animal’s genetic make-up and its environment.

Mechanisms of behaviour - The machinery of behaviour, including the nervous and sensory systems of animals

Learning theory - Essentials of classical and instrumental conditioning will be introduced.

Recording behaviour - How to observe and record animal behaviour.

Summary statistics and data presentation - How to summarise and present data in a clear manner.


Section 4: Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit the student will be able to:

Demonstrate an understanding of the four levels of explanation of behaviour.

Recognise the basic principles of behavioural ecology.

Understand how behaviour develops.

Describe the neuronal control of behaviour.

Describe classical and instrumental learning theory.

Record simple behavioural patterns.

Calculate and present summary statistics that describe a given set of data.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/Methods

Students will achieve their learning outcomes through participation in lectures, practical classes, seminars and directed reading. There will be individual written work and class discussions based upon a series of lectures and practical sessions. Students will be encouraged to carry out their own research.


Section 6: Assessment

The assessment will take the format of two practical books, worth 30% each and a time-constrained phase test worth 40% of the total mark.


Section 7: Relationship to Professional Body

N/A


Section 8: Indicative Reading

Manning A. & Stamp Dawkins, M.S. (1998) An Introduction to Animal Behaviour (5th Edition). Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0 521 57891 4.

Alcock, J. (2001) Animal Behaviour: An Evolutionary Approach. Sinauer Associates. ISBN 0 87893 011 6

Krebs, J.R. & Davies, N.B. (1995) An introduction to behavioural ecology (3rd edition). Oxford, Blackwells. ISBN 063 203 5463.

McFarland, D. (1999) Animal behaviour: psychobiology, ethology and evolution. Harlow, Prentice Hall. ISBN 058 232 7326.


Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Research Methods and Biometrics


Faculty

Health Life and Social Sciences


Department

Biological Sciences


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

Equine Science
Animal Behaviour Science
Animal Management and Welfare
Equine Sports Science
Conservation Biology
BioveterinaryScience

Code:

Bioxxx

Credit Rating:


15


Level:


1

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


F. Owen


Section 2: Module Synopsis

This unit is concerned with developing skills required to interpret and present primary and secondary research information. It describes and discusses application of descriptive statistics. Some of the key analytical techniques and instrumentation that will be used throughout the course will be introduced and students will develop skills that enable them to use them accurately. The principle of the mole and use and conversion of SI units will be introduced and the importance of accuracy of measurement be learned.


Section 3: Outline Syllabus

Primary research: experimental design and data collection

Identifying research questions, aims and objectives of an experiment, hypothesis and predictions, controls and replication, sampling techniques, avoiding bias, defining data variables.

Quantitative methods: Types of data, quantitative and qualitative, the nature of data – nominal, ordinal, ratio and interval scales.

Populations and samples, distribution of data – normal and non normal, transformation of data, frequency, summary statistics.

Measures of central tendency, measures of variability, correct graphical presentation for specific types of data.

Data presentation: Scientific writing, written presentation of experimental work, reports, abstracts, spoken presentation of experimental work.

Analytical techniques: Colorimetry – use and theory of spectrophotometer and colorimeter and photometry, use of microscopes, titrations, molarity, osmolarity, accuracy of measurement, serial dilutions, SI units, chromatography.


Section 4: Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

Devise, test and present experimental hypotheses using appropriate methods

Understand the importance of and use accurately analytical weigh balances and measuring instruments.

Understand the principles of general analytical equipment such as spectrophotometers and various chromatographic techniques.

Use SI units and convert one to another.

Describe data using descriptive statistics.

Select and use appropriate descriptive statistics.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/Methods

Students will achieve their learning outcomes through participation in lectures, practical classes and tutorials. Students will be encouraged to carry out their own research. Where appropriate practical classes and tutorials and group work will extend into the students’ self directed study time.


Section 6: Assessment

There will be three written pieces of coursework- a phase test (25%), a laboratory report. (25%), and a project presentation (50%).


Section 7: Relationship to Professional Body


Section 8: Indicative Reading

Barnard, C., Gilbert, F. and MacGregor, P., (1993). Asking questions in biology; design, analysis and presentation in practical work. Harlow, UK: Longman. ISBN 0582 088 542.

Pentz, M. and Shott, M., (1988). Handling experimental data. Milton Keynes: Open University Press. ISBN 0335 158 978.

Fowler, J., Cohen, L. and Jarvis, P. (1998). Practical statistics for field biology, 2nd edition. Chichester, UK: John Wiley. ISBN 0471 982 954.

Lewis, M. and Waller, G. (1980). Thinking chemistry. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0199 140 74x.


Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Animal Learning and Training

Faculty

Health, Life & Social Sciences


Department

Biological Sciences


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

Animal Behaviour Science

Animal Management and Welfare


Code:

Bioxxx


Credit Rating:


15


Level:


2


Pre-requisites:


None


Co-requisites:


None


Barred Combinations:


None


Module Co-ordinator:


J. Mee



Section 2: Module Synopsis

This module examines the principles of learning and how they are applied to the planned modification of animal behaviour. It reviews a range of aids used in training and the principles behind their use as well as the principles of effective communication, which are vital to successful animal training. Students develop their psychomotor skills by executing a range of practical training exercises.


Section 3: Outline Syllabus

The nature of learning: Assessing when learning has occurred, associative and non-associative learning, procedural versus cognitive interpretations of learning, the behavioural ecology of learning, contingency and contiguity.

Learning processes: Habituation, sensitisation, classical and operant conditioning; Reinforcement, punishment and non-reinforcement. Inadvertent training in the development and resolution of problem behaviour. Primary and higher order conditioning; Social learning

The science of animal training: Chaining of responses, differential reinforcement and successive approximation, counter-conditioning, systematic desensitisation, training aids and their application. Discriminative stimuli and response generalisation. Inter specific communication. Design, assessment and monitoring of a training regime. Scientific analysis of animal training


Section 4: Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this module, the student will be able to:

Explain the principles and scientific basis of learning and training in animals

Demonstrate the ability to undertake a range of basic training procedures.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/Methods

Students will achieve their learning outcomes through participation in lectures, demonstrations and practical classes. Students will be encouraged to carry out their own research.


Section 6: Assessment

Summative assessment is in three parts:

Contribution to discussion board items (20%)

A log book covering practical work (30%).

A multiple choice examination (50%)


Section 7: Relationship to Professional Body

The content of this module is in accordance with the standards published by the Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour for the certification of clinical companion animal behaviourists, and so may contribute in partial fulfilment of this scheme.


Section 8: Indicative Reading
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