An exhibition of material from the Monash University Library




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133. “Driving around Darwin”, by Ernestine Hill, in Walkabout, July 1936, p. 40.

Walkabout, a monthly magazine published by the Australian National Travel Association, first appeared in 1934 and frequently included articles by and about Australian writers. Ernestine Hill was a dedicated traveller and after her husband’s death in 1933 embarked on a life of almost continual travel. Her first major publication, The Great Australian Loneliness (1937) is an account of five years’ travel around the Australian outback.


134. “In the wake of the willy-willies”, by Ernestine Hill, in Walkabout, Nov. 1935, p. 25.

135. “The need for wilderness”, by Marie B. Byles, in Bushland, v. 1, no. 2, March 1938.

A graduate of the University of Sydney, Marie Byles was the first woman to practise law in New South Wales, a feminist and a champion of the League of Nations. She maintained strong interests in travel, conservation and wildlife issues and, like Margaret Gilruth, sought to travel by less conventional means such as cargo ships.

136. “Coloured characters”, by H. Drake-Brockman, in Walkabout, June 1945, p. 13.


137. “The golden hat”, by Margaret Fane and Hilary Lofting, in Sydney Mail, 6 may, 1925, p. 12.


138. “The birthday”, by M. W. Peacock, in The Home, 2 Feb. 1942, p. 34.


139. “Distinctly old”, by Myra Morris, in The Home, 2 Sept. 1940, p. 34.


140. “The island flower”, by Myra Morris, in Sydney Mail, 23 March 1927, p. 18.


141. “Escape: short story”, by J. L. [Jean] Ranken, in Sydney Mail, 18 May, 1938, p. 12.


Historical fiction


142. Dark, Eleanor, 1901-1985.


The timeless land / Eleanor Dark. (1941, Sydney : Collins, 1963)

The Timeless Land is the first volume in Dark’s trilogy which also included Storm of Time (1948) and No Barrier (1953). Dark is perhaps best known to many readers for these three novels which trace the development of European settlement in Australia, 1788-1814. Based on extensive historical research, the trilogy is notable for Dark’s attempts to acknowledge Australia’s indigenous past and to include race conflict as a dimension of the settlement. Storm of Time covers the first five years of European settlement and also explores the relationship between Governor Phillip and Bennelong.

143. Lancaster, G. B. [Edith Joan Lyttleton] , 1874-1945.

Pageant / by G.B. Lancaster. (New York : The Literary Guild, 1933)


Pageant draws on Lancaster’s family background in Tasmania to depict the fortunes of a Tasmanian family from the 1820s to the twentieth century. Pageant is considered the best of Lancaster’s works and won the Australian Literature Society Gold Medal for the best novel of 1933.

144. Lancaster, G. B., 1874-1945.

Pageant / G.B. Lancaster. (1933, New York : Triangle, 1942)


145. Simpson, Helen, 1897-1940


Under Capricorn (London: William Heinemann Ltd, 1937)


Born in Australia, Simpson left for England at the age of sixteen where she became a well-known crime writer. Her work is almost entirely set and published in England. In Under Capricorn, she created a novel focussed on Australian crime, although it is strongly historical and set in the high days of convict Sydney. Hitchcock’s film of the novel, which starred Ingrid Bergman and Michael Wilding, indicates both her standing and the potential of her work.


1Endnotes


Dennis Shoesmith, “The new woman: The debate on the ‘new woman’ in Melbourne, 1919,” Politics 8.2 (November 1973): 318.

2 Quoted in “Women’s Suffrage in Victoria,” Refractory Girl (May 1981) at 20.

3 Alison Mackinnon, Love and Freedom: Professional Women and the Reshaping of Personal Life (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997) 12.

4 The Age (22 March 1919).

5 John Garth, “Our Girl,” Australian Magazine 6.11 (August 1908): 1008.

6 Ibid., 1007.

7 Ibid., 1006.

8 Louise Mack, An Australian Girl in London (London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1902).

9 Rosa Campbell Praed, My Australian Girlhood (London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1902); Lilian Turner, An Australian Lassie (London: Ward, Lock, & Co., 1903).

10 Kerreen M. Reiger, The Disenchantment of the Home: Modernising the Australian Family, 1880-1940 (Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1985) 40.

11 Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar, No Man’s Land: The Place of the Woman Writer in the Twentieth Century (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1988) 156. Marianne DeKoven also argues that “modernist form evolved precisely as an adequate means of representing [the] tarrying appeal [of] late nineteenth and twentieth century feminism and socialism”. See Rich and Strange: Gender, History, Modernism (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1991) at 4.

12 Andreas Huyssen, After the Great Divide: Modernism, Mass culture, Postmodernism (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1986) 214.

13 Judith Butler, Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of “Sex” (New York: Routledge, 1993) 15.

14 Zora Cross, An Introduction to the Study of Australian Literature (Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1922) 40.

15 Nettie Palmer, Modern Australian Literature: 1900-1923 (Melbourne: Lothian, 1924) 54-55.

16 Rosalind Krauss, “The Originality of the Avant-Garde,” (1981) quoted in Bridget Elliott and Jo-Ann Wallace, Women Artists and Writers: Modernist (im)positionings (London: Routledge, 1994) at 34.

17 Marie Pitt, letter to Ted Turner, 5 January 1939, H.H. Pearce Private Collection, MS 2765 III, NLA.

18 Ibid.

19 Mary Gilmore, Letters of Mary Gilmore ed. W.H. Wilde and T. Inglis Moore (Carlton: Melbourne University Press, 1980) 194.

20FAW Papers ML MSS 2008, Box K22105.

21FAW Papers ML MSS 2008, Box K22117.

22 Norman Freehill with Dymphna Cusack, Dymphna (Mlebourne: Nelson, 1975): 44.

23Miles Franklin and George Ashton, "Is the writer involved in the political development of his country?" Australian Writers Speak (Sydney: Angus and Robertson, 1943): 31.

24M. Barnard to Leslie Rees, 28 November 1934 [Leslie Rees Papers, ML MSS 5454/1]. See also, Nettie Palmer, "The Writer's 'Lot Austere'", The Bulletin, 5 February 1936: 4.

25M. Barnard to Leslie Rees, 5 January 1934 [Leslie Rees Papers, ML MSS 5454/1].

26F. Eldershaw, "The Future of Australian Literature": 13.

27 Susan Sheridan, Along the Faultlines (Sydney: Allen & Unwin, 1995): viii.

28 Kay Ferres, “Introduction”, The Time to Write (Ringwood: Penguin, 1993): 5.

29 Norman Freehill with Dymphna Cusack, Dymphna (Mlebourne: Nelson, 1975): 44.

30 Hanne K. Bock, “Her Own Room: The Gendering of Henry Handel Richardson” in The Time to Write: Australian Women Writers 1890-1930, ed. Kay Ferres (Ringwood: Penguin, 1993):193.

31 Kay Ferres, “Introduction”, The Time to Write (Ringwood: Penguin, 1993): 4.

32 John Arnold, “Kerr, Doris Boake (1889 - 1944)'”, Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 15, (Melbourne: Melbourne University Press, 2000): 12.

33 Norman Freehill with Dymphna Cusack, Dymphna (Melbourne: Nelson, 1975): 44.

34 Mary Gilmore, letter to Miles Franklin, 26 April 1942, Miles Franklin Papers, MS 364, ML.

35 Marjorie Barnard, letter to Nettie Palmer, 27 September 1934. Palmer Papers NLA MSS 1174/1/4497-8.

36 “Eleanor Dark” in William Wilde et al eds. The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature (Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1985):203.

37 Dorothy Green, “Chaos, or a Dancing Star? Christina Stead’s Seven Poor Men of Sydney”, Meanjin 27:2 (1968): 151.

38 Kay Ferres, “Introduction”, The Time to Write (Ringwood: Penguin, 1993): 9.

39 Marjorie Barnard, letter to Nettie Palmer, 25 November 1935. Palmer Papers NLA MSS 1174/1/4838-41.

40 Martha Rutledge, “Deamer, Mary Elizabeth Kathleen Dulcie (1890 - 1972)”, Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 8, (Melbourne: Melbourne University Press, 1981): 256.

41 Mary Fullerton as ‘E’, Moles Do So Little with Their Privacy (Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1942).

42 Joy Hooton, “Mary Fullerton: Pioneering and Feminism,” The Time to Write: Australian Women Writers 1890-1930, ed. Kay Ferres (Ringwood: Penguin, 1993) 43.

43 Debra Adelaide, “How Did Authors Make a Living?” A History of the Book in Australia 1891-1945, ed. Martyn Lyons & John Arnold (St. Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 2001): 87.

44 Mary Fullerton, Moles, op. cit., 34.

45 Ibid., 60.

46 Ibid.

47 Mary Gilmore, letter to Miles Franklin, 2 July 1943, Miles Franklin Papers, MS 364, ML.

48 Esmonde Higgins, letter to Nettie Palmer, May 1914, Palmer Papers, MS 1174/1/1103, NLA.

49 Nettie Palmer, letter to Esmonde Higgins, 13 November 1914, Esmonde Higgins Papers, MS 740 ML.

50 “Little Poems by Nettie Palmer,” Bulletin (25 February 1915): 1.

51 Nettie Palmer, letter to Esmonde Higgins, 18 April 1915, E.M. Higgins Papers, MS 740/8/138, ML.

52 Lesbia Harford, The Poems of Lesbia Harford, ed. Nettie Palmer (Melbourne: Melbourne University Press, 1941).

53 Nettie Palmer, letter to Guido Baracchi, 2 May 1942, Baracchi Papers, MS 5241, folder 1, NLA.

54 Virginia Woolf, “Mr. Bennett and Mrs Brown,” 1924, rpt in Collected Essays Vol. 1. (London: Hogarth, 1966) 326.

55 Colleen Burke, Doherty’s Corner: The Life and Work of Poet Marie E.J. Pitt (North Ryde: Angus & Robertson, 1985) 2.

56 Michael Sharkey, “Zora Cross’s Entry into Australian Literature,” Hecate 16.1-2 (1990): 65.

57 George Robertson, letter to Bertram Stevens, 29 October 1917, Dear Robertson, Letters to an Australian Publisher ed. A.W. Barker (Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1982) 84.

58 Zora Cross, Songs of Love and Life (Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1917).

59 Christopher Brennan, letter to George Robertson, Angus and Robertson Papers, MS 314/108, ML.

60 Epigraph to A.D. Hirst, Through the Gates (Sydney: Tyrell’s, 1921) n.pag.

61 Nettie Higgins, letter to Vance Palmer, 1911, MS 1174/1/479, NLA.

62 Nettie Higgins, letter to Vance Palmer, early March [1910], Palmer Papers MS 1174/1/288, NLA.

63 Catherine W. Reilly, ed. Upon My Heart, Women’s Poetry and Verse of the First World War. London: Virago, 1981, XXXV

64 Zora Cross, The City of Riddle-me-ree (Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1918).

65 Zora Cross, An Introduction to the Study of Australian Literature (Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1922) n.pag.

66 Modjeska, Exiles at Home, op. cit., 200.

67 Nettie Palmer, Modern Australian Literature 1900-1923 (Melbourne: Lothian, 1924).

68Letter from Frank Dalby Davison to Dymphna Cusack, 1968. Quoted in Len Fox, ed. Dream at a Graveside: The History of the Fellowship of Australian Writers 1928-1988 (Sydney: FAW, 1988): 77.

69M. Barnard to Nettie Palmer, 2 July 1935 [Palmer Papers NLA MSS 1174/1/4703].

70M. Barnard to Nettie Palmer, 10 November 1935 [Palmer Papers NLA MSS 1174/1/4822].

71M. Barnard to Nettie Palmer, 30 March 1939 [Palmer Papers NLA MSS 1174/1/5502].

72 Mary Fullerton, letter to Miles Franklin, 27 March 1928, Miles Franklin Papers, MS 364/16, ML.

73 Miles Franklin, letter to Mary Fullerton, 13 February 1929, Miles Franklin Papers, MSS 364/16, ML.

74 Mary Fullerton, letter to Miles Franklin, 27 March 1930, Miles Franklin Papers, MSS 364/16, ML.

75 Marjorie Barnard, letter to Nettie Palmer, 25 September 1931, Palmer Papers NLA MSS 1174/1/3816-8

76 Miles Franklin, letter to Mary Fullerton, 22 February 1937, Miles Franklin Papers, MSS 364/17, ML.

77 Mary Fullerton, The People of the Timber Belt (London: Philpot, 1925); A Juno of the Bush (London: Heath Cranton, 1930); The Australian Bush (London: Dent, 1928).

78 Susan Lever, Real Relations: The Feminist Politics of Form in Australian Literature (Rushcutters Bay: Halstead Press, 2000).

79 Miles Franklin, letter to Mary Fullerton, 1 February 1930, Miles Franklin Papers, MS 364/16, ML.

80 Juliet Flesch, From Australia with Love: A History of Modern Australian Popular Romance Novels (Fremantle: Fremantle Arts Centre, 2004).

81 Marjorie Barnard, letter to Nettie Palmer, 22 January 1938. Palmer Papers NLA MSS 1174/1/5361-2.
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