Fdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement)




НазваниеFdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement)
страница8/10
Дата11.09.2012
Размер0.74 Mb.
ТипДокументы
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10



Module Specification


Module Title

Food Quality Assurance and Safety





Faculty

Faculty of Media, Humanities and Technology


Department/Subject

Riseholme College / Food Manufacture


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

BSc (Hons) Food Manufacture (all routes)

BSc (Hons) Agriculture and Environment

FDSc Food Manufacture (all routes)

FDSc Agriculture and Environment

FDSc Commercial Horticulture


Code:




Credit Rating:


15

Level:


Level 1

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


Mark Swainson




Module synopsis

Quality assurance plays a legal and moral role within the production of food for both the processor and producer. This module develops knowledge and understanding of available quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) management methods whilst adhering to required legislation and codes of practice and discusses the concept of risk. The rationale of HACCP and the concept of Total Quality Management (TQM) are explored together with the schemes used to monitor management systems. The learner will investigate the content of the syllabus in relation to a variety of product areas. The module is delivered to assist in understanding within the wider delivery of the programme.




Outline syllabus

Food Safety

Producer / processor constraints

To examine the sources of biological / chemical and physical contamination in relation to food safety

Food Standards agency

Legislation and codes of practice

To examine food safety trends from a commercial perspective, in particular public perception and the market response to a given situation.

QA / QC and the role of HACCP

QA and QC systems

Principles of HACCP and TQM

Auditing

Subjective and objective testing

Risk assessment

Assurance schemes

Farm and crop assured

Global Gap

BRC

EFSIS

Soil Association (organic schemes)

GAP and GMP




Learning outcomes

The student will be able to:

  1. Describe the role of legislative and regulatory bodies in food safety and the market/commercial response to food safety issues.

  2. Discuss the quality systems that monitor production and the role of management in those systems and the role of assurance schemes.

  3. Discuss the role and implementation of HACCP in a food context.




Teaching and Learning Strategy/Methods

Teaching methods and learning strategy will include: lectures, seminars, tutorials, group and individual study, and where appropriate within the subject, visits to appropriate food manufacturing sites or companies and invited speakers on specialist topics.

Supported distance learning students will have access to learning materials via the virtual learning network. This network will provide the student with collaborative group work, lecture notes, presentations, exercises, assessments and tutor feedback. Tutor support and access will be via telephone and/or e.mail. Study weeks will provide more formal contact with peer group members and tutors.




Assessment strategy




Outcome

Assessment

Weighting

1,2

Assignment 1

60%

3

Assignment 2

40%
















Indicative reading

Please note that this list is as provided at the time of validation of the module. The current recommended list will be found in the relevant student handbook.

Reading materials relating to this module can be found at:

www.brc.org.uk

www.defra.gov.uk

www.efsis.com

www.fabbl.co.uk

www.foodstandards.gov.uk

www.rdg.ac.uk/iagrm

www.soilassociation.org

Ali I. (2004) Food Quality Assurance: Principles and Practices. CRC Press

Bedford L.V. (2002) HACCP in Agriculture: Livestock Production. CCFRA

Dillon, M (1996) How to HACCP: an Illustrated Guide. Grimsby: MD Associates

Dillon M and Griffith C (2001) How to HACCP: A Management Guide. MD Associates

Forsythe and Hayes (1998) Microbiology and HACCP. Aspen

Montimore S. and Wallace C. (2001) HACCP, London, Blackwell Science

Parry, T (1990) Principles of Microbiology for Students of Food Technology. London, Thornes

Springett, M (1998) Raw materials and the quality of processed foods. London, Blackie





Relationship to Professional Body

CIEH HACCP in Practice Certificate



Module Specification


Module Title


Forecasting and Planning for Businesses

Faculty


Faculty of Media, Humanities and Technology

Department/Subject


Riseholme College/Food Manufacture

Programme(s) in which this Module appears:

BSc (Hons) in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement)

FDSc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement).

Code:


Will be allocated by Academic Registry once module is approved

Credit Rating:


15

Level:


Level 1

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


Mike Dudbridge




Module synopsis

The module will allow the student to explore the reasons for, and methods of, forecasting in the food industry.

The impact of inaccurate forecasts on the ability to supply and the cost of supply will be explored along with the potential financial benefit of an accurate forecasting system. The commercial relationship between supplier and customer will be studied and models will be built to enable the student to predict the impact of sales fluctuations on a business.

Seasonality and promotional activity have a massive impact on the demands of the market and the role of forecasting in the satisfaction of that demand at minimum cost is vital and will form a large portion of the work in this module.





Outline syllabus

The Module will cover:


  1. Forecast models based on historical data:

    1. Spreadsheets study the interrelationships in the food industry;

    2. Relate sales of an item to weather patterns;

    3. Relate retail sales to the time of year;

(2) The inter-relation of events using statistical techniques:

(i) Using statistical techniques decide if the correlation is significant or chance;

  1. Forecasting data in a form that would be easily communicated to a group of manufacturing management:

    1. Use graphical techniques to relate the information required;

  2. Consequences of inaccurate forecasts on all aspects of a food manufacturing business:

    1. The cost of inaccurate forecasting will be related to case studies and real life forecasting requirements;

  3. Commercial relationships and agreements between manufacturers and their suppliers and analyse the impact of poor forecasting on the relationship;

    1. Cost and service implications are studied;

  4. The degree of flexibility that could be built into supplier agreements is also investigated.







Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module the student will be able to:

  1. Build a simple spreadsheet based forecasting model and relate the information that the data produces in statistical terms;

  2. Report on the ability of the food industry to maintain flexibility in supply at the same time as driving cost out of the businesses;

  3. Describe the impact of a poor forecast on the performance of a food manufacturing and logistics business.







Teaching and Learning Strategy/Methods

Teaching methods and learning strategy will include: lectures, seminars, tutorials, group and individual study, and where appropriate within the subject, visits to appropriate food manufacturing sites or companies and invited speakers on specialist topics.

Supported distance learning students will have access to learning materials via the virtual learning network. This network will provide the student with collaborative group work, lecture notes, presentations, exercises, assessments and tutor feedback. Tutor support and access will be via telephone and/or e.mail. Study weeks will provide more formal contact with peer group members and tutors.




Assessment strategy

The learning outcomes will be assessed through coursework assessments:


Outcomes

Assessment

% Weighting

1

Written report 1

50

2 and 3

Written report 2

50







Indicative reading

Bails, D.G. and Peppers, L.C (1992) Business Fluctuations: Forecasting Techniques and Applications, Prentice Hall

Bolt, G. (1994) Marketing and Sales Forecasting: A Total Approach, Kogan Page

Davis, J. (1988) Practical Sales Forecasting, McGraw-Hill Publishing Co.

Farrell, W. (1998) How Hits Happen: Forecasting Predictability in a Chaotic Marketplace, (Business Essentials) Texere Publishing

Smith, B. (1984) Focus Forecasting: Computer Techniques for Inventory Control, Wight (Oliver) Publications Inc.





Relationship to Professional Body

None




Level 2 Modules


Module Specification


Module Title


Health and Diet

Faculty


Faculty of Media, Humanities and Technology

Department/Subject


Riseholme College/Food Manufacture

Programme(s) in which this Module appears:

BSc (Hons) in Food Manufacture (all routes)

FDSc in Food Manufacture (all routes).

Code:


Will be allocated by Academic Registry once module is approved

Credit Rating:


15

Level:


2

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


Yunus Khatri




Module synopsis

This module aims to provide background knowledge to the fundamental aspects of food, health and nutrition. The student will gain an understanding of health related problems associated with diet. The module will also allow the student to study the increasing use of functional foods in food manufacturing.




Outline syllabus

The Module will cover:

  1. Use and function of nutrients, micronutrients and functional foods;

  2. Composition of body, nutritional guidelines, energy intake and expenditure;

  3. Malnutrition and nutritional disorders;

  4. Nutritional changes during food processing and storage.




Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module the student will be able to:

  1. Review the role of food and nutrients in health and well being;

  2. Apply their knowledge on nutritional changes during food processing and storage;

  3. Evaluate strategies for good dietary practice.




Teaching and Learning Strategy/Methods

Teaching methods and learning strategy will include: lectures, seminars, tutorials, group and individual study, and where appropriate within the subject, visits to appropriate food manufacturing sites or companies and invited speakers on specialist topics.

Supported distance learning students will have access to learning materials via the virtual learning network. This network will provide the student with collaborative group work, lecture notes, presentations, exercises, assessments and tutor feedback. Tutor support and access will be via telephone and/or e.mail. Study weeks will provide more formal contact with peer group members and tutors.




Assessment strategy

The learning outcomes will be assessed through coursework assessments:

Outcomes

Assessment

% Weighting

1, 2

Written report 1

50

1, 3

Written report 2

50







Indicative reading

Eastwood, M. (2003) Principles of Human Nutrition 2nd Ed., Blackwell Publishing, UK.

Garrow, J.S., James, W.P.T and Ralph, A. (2000) Human Nutrition and Dietetics 10th Ed., Churchill, Livingstone.

Pender, F. (1994) Nutrition and Dietetics, Campion Press, Edinburgh.

Whitney, E.N., Cataldo, C.B. and Rolfes, S.R. (1991) Understanding Normal and Clinical Nutrition 3rd Ed., West Publishing Company, St. Paul, MN, USA.





Relationship to Professional Body

None




Module Specification


Module Title


Food Process, Preservation and Packaging

Faculty


Faculty of Media, Humanities and Technology

Department/Subject


Riseholme College/Food Manufacture

Programme(s) in which this Module appears:

BSc (Hons) in Food Manufacture (all routes)

FDSc in Food Manufacture (all routes).

Code:


Will be allocated by Academic Registry once module is approved

Credit Rating:


15

Level:


Level 2

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


Amar Aouzelleg




Module synopsis

This module will allow the student to develop knowledge and understanding of the major food processing and preservation methods. The technological aspects of food manufacture will centre on the precise description of a process in a process specification. The module will also focus on the evaluation of the food process in terms of its safety to the consumer and also the effects on the food flavours, colours and textures. Packaging systems will also be studied with respect to their contribution to the growth of the food manufacturing industry.




Outline syllabus

The Module will cover:

  1. The processing stages in the manufacture of a range of food products:

    1. Cereal based, meat based, ready meal;

  2. The effectiveness of a food process in relation to food safety, quality and manufacturing efficiencies:

    1. Microbiology risks;

  3. Food preservation principles: principles of preservation by use of high temperature, low temperature, reduction of water activity, chemical preservatives, modifies atmosphere packaging, radiation and high pressure;

  4. Principles of processing: heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, sensible and latent heat. Application to sterilisation, freezing, dehydration and evaporation processes.

  5. Heat transfer principles, thermal properties of foods and processing equipment;

  6. Thermal processing; Pasteurisation and commercial sterilisation theory, in-container and bulk liquid processing, microbial death kinetics and process lethality, UHT and aseptic processing;

  7. Freezing and refrigeration: ice crystal theory and the effect of freezing rate on food quality, thawing methods and principles, principles of refrigeration;

  8. Chilling and chilling systems: the importance of the cold chain and its implications for quality and safety. Use of temperature data-loggers and time temperature integrators.

  9. Drying, concentration of liquids: water activity, equipment and applications, effects on food quality.

  10. Process specifications for a simple product and use the process specification to select the equipment and define controls required;

  11. Food package designs that comply with legislation in all respects and also contribute to the marketability of the food in some way:




Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module the student will be able to:

  1. Identify and describe the major food preservation principles;

  2. Describe the principles, application and practice of a range of processing techniques;

  3. Review the importance of process control and raw materials to the process;

  4. Carry out laboratory tasks in a safe manner.




Teaching and Learning Strategy/Methods

Teaching methods and learning strategy will include: lectures, seminars, tutorials, group and individual study, and where appropriate within the subject, visits to appropriate food manufacturing sites or companies and invited speakers on specialist topics.

Supported distance learning students will have access to learning materials via the virtual learning network. This network will provide the student with collaborative group work, lecture notes, presentations, exercises, assessments and tutor feedback. Tutor support and access will be via telephone and/or e.mail. Study weeks will provide more formal contact with peer group members and tutors.

Assessment strategy

The learning outcomes will be assessed through coursework assessments:


Outcomes

Assessment

% Weighting

1, 2, 3

Report 1

20

4

Report 2

40

1, 2, 3

Open book phase test

40







Indicative reading

Earl, R.L. (1983) Module Operations in Food Processing, Butterworth-Heinemann

Fellows, P. J.(2000) Food Processing Technology, CRC Press

Jongen, W.(2002) Fruit and Vegetable Processing, CRC Press

Man, D. (2001) Shelf Life, Blackwell Science





Relationship to Professional Body

None




Module Specification


Module Title


New Process Development

Faculty


Faculty of Media, Humanities and Technology

Department/Subject


Riseholme College/Food Manufacture

Programme(s) in which this Module appears:

BSc (Hons) in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement)

FDSc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement)

Code:


Will be allocated by Academic Registry once module is approved

Credit Rating:


15

Level:


2

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


Mark Swainson




Module synopsis

This module introduces students to the concept of process development and its role and application within the food industry. The module seeks to reinforce the importance of process development to the food industry and confirm the interrelationship with other departments and processes involved in product manufacture.

Practically based, the module focuses on practical assessment and seeks to develop skills in the sensory evaluation of food qualities in relation to food process development.





Outline syllabus

The Module will cover:


  1. Concept generation and consumer research;

    1. link with marketing, brainstorming, primary versus secondary research;

    2. questionnaire design and use, analysing results decision making;

  2. Sensory evaluation;

    1. definition, use, human senses, parameters for measuring, effect of other attributes on taste, standardisation taste panels design and use of quality attribute sheets.

Process Development


  1. Project planning and management;

  2. Critical paths, potential problems;

  3. Meeting customer needs;

  4. Developing rapport, understanding needs;

  5. Preparing a design brief;

    1. process and product description, target, capital availability projected volume, pack size shelf and storage life, packaging and mode of distribution, target customers, labelling claims which must be met by the formulation, time-scale target launch date. Relationship to and conformity with existing product lines, other information;

  6. Concept to scaling up;

  7. Pilot plant and factory implementation, review and analysis of cost, training;

  8. Long-term planning;

  9. Investment, recruitment, raw material and process development;

  10. Product throughput planning;

  11. Process improvement and efficiency;

  12. Process balance to improve efficiency;

  13. New technology development and its impact on process design;

  14. Process flow efficiencies.







Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module the student will be able to:

  1. Develop a sensory test for a food product;

  2. Conceptually develop a new product

  3. Consider labelling, market research and legislation for a new food product.




Teaching and Learning Strategy/Methods

Teaching methods and learning strategy will include: lectures, seminars, tutorials, group and individual study, and where appropriate within the subject, visits to appropriate food manufacturing sites or companies and invited speakers on specialist topics.

Supported distance learning students will have access to learning materials via the virtual learning network. This network will provide the student with collaborative group work, lecture notes, presentations, exercises, assessments and tutor feedback. Tutor support and access will be via telephone and/or e.mail. Study weeks will provide more formal contact with peer group members and tutors.





Assessment strategy

The learning outcomes will be assessed through coursework assessments:


Outcomes

Assessment

% Weighting

1

Practical Report

30

2, 3

Project Report

70







Indicative reading

Carr, T. (1999) Sensory Evaluation Techniques, CRC Press Inc.

Crag, C. (1997) Guidelines on the Verification of Re-heating Instructions for Microwaveable Foods: Guideline no.14 , Campden Publications.

Earle, M.D. and Earle, R (1999) Creating New Foods, The Product Developers Guide, Chandos.

Earle, M.D. and Anderson, A.M. Eds (1985) Product and Process Development in the Food Industry, Harwood Academic

Lawless, H.T. (1999) Sensory Evaluation of Food: Principles and Practices, Gaithersburg, Md: Aspen

McCance, R.A. and Widdowson, E.M. (1996) The Composition of Foods, Royal Society of Chemistry.

Resurreccion, A. (1998) Consumer Sensory Testing for Product Development, Aspen

Rosse, J., Ramalingham, A., Kraner, V. and Gimson, G. (1999) Food Process Development and Design, Chapman and Hall





Relationship to Professional Body

None




Module Specification


Module Title

Work Based Project – Process and Business Improvement

Faculty

Faculty of Media, Humanities and Technology


Department/Subject

Riseholme College / Food Manufacture


Programme(s) in which this Module appears:

FdSc Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement)

Code:




Credit Rating:


30

Level:


2

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:



Amar Aouzelleg
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

Похожие:

Fdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement) iconFdsc in Food Manufacture (Meat Processing)

Fdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement) iconMajor process improvement programs that contributed to lean six sigma

Fdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement) iconBusiness Process Transformation

Fdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement) iconBusiness Process Transformation

Fdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement) iconBusiness Process Transformation

Fdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement) iconBusiness and Process of hpt: Project Management

Fdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement) iconNutraceuticals, nutrigenomics, Public Health Nutrition, Clinical and Therapeutic Nutrition, Institutional Food Administration, Food Science, Food Safety, Food Toxicology and Quality Control

Fdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement) iconA process Analysis and Modeling Framework for the Concurrent Engineering of Business Processes and Manufacturing Activities – Conceptual Design

Fdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement) iconBusiness Process Change Management iems 416 Professor Mark Werwath, PhD 847-491-4696 m- course summary

Fdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement) iconPeter N. Nemetz, Ph. D. Professor of Strategy and Business Economics Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration University of British Columbia Journal of International Business Education, 2003, in press. Revised May 11, 2003

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница