Fdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement)




НазваниеFdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement)
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Relationship to Professional Body

None.




Module Specification


Module Title


Principles of Food Science and Microbiology

Faculty


Faculty of Media, Humanities and Technology

Department/Subject


Riseholme College/Food Manufacture

Programme(s) in which this Module appears:

BSc in Food Manufacture (all routes)

FDSc in Food Manufacture (all routes)

Code:


Will be allocated by Academic Registry once module is approved

Credit Rating:


15

Level:


Level 1

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


Pauline Lovatt




Module synopsis

This module aims to provide background knowledge to the chemistry and microbiology of food stuffs. The student will study the basic chemical structure of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. The student will also be introduced to laboratory safety and the codes of practice relevant to practical work undertaken. The module will also enable the student to understand the chemical and biological changes which occur during processing and storage of food materials.

This module will develop the student’s understanding of the principles of microbiology. The student will develop an understanding of the principles and practices that underlie food microbiology. The module reviews the nature, range and growth patterns of specific micro-organisms within foods. The module will also develop the basic practical skills required in microbiological analysis to include aseptic technique, media, enumeration and identification of food microflora. The module will investigate the spoilage patterns and pathogens associated with food commodities.




Outline syllabus

The Module will cover:

  1. The chemical structures of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids;

  2. Undertake laboratory testing of food stuffs to determine their lipid, protein and carbohydrate content;

  3. Review the structure of dispersions systems within food products;

  4. Study the chemical and biological changes that occur during processing and storage of foods;

  5. Undertake microbiological sampling, enumeration and identification;

    1. To include constraints and advantages of rapid and traditional microbiological methodologies;

  6. Demonstrate an understanding of microbial toxins, spores, viruses and fungi and their relationship to food safety;

  7. Describe the factors that affect the growth of microbes in foods;

  8. Determination of the factors which effect the microbiological shelf life of a food product;

  9. Use experimental and mathematical data to predict the shelf-life of a food product.




Learning outcomes

On completion of this module the student will be able to:

  1. Describe and compare the function and properties of the main food components and dispersion systems;

  2. Outline the chemical and biological changes that occur during processing and storage of foods;

  3. Assess the importance of microbial toxins, spores, viruses, fungi and their relationship to food safety;

  4. Describe the factors that affect the growth of microbes in foods;

  5. Assess microbiological and chemical methods used within the food industry.




Teaching and learning strategy/methods

Teaching methods and learning strategy will include: lectures, seminars, tutorials, group and individual study, and where appropriate within the subject, visits to appropriate food manufacturing sites or companies and invited speakers on specialist topics.

Supported distance learning students will have access to learning materials via the virtual learning network. This network will provide the student with collaborative group work, lecture notes, presentations, exercises, assessments and tutor feedback. Tutor support and access will be via telephone and/or e.mail. Study weeks will provide more formal contact with peer group members and tutors.





Assessment strategy

The learning outcomes will be assessed through coursework assessments:


Outcomes

Assessment

Duration

% Weighting

1,2

Written report 1

2 weeks

25

3,4

Written report 2

2 weeks

25

ALL

Phase Test

N/A

50







Indicative reading

Bridson, E.Y. (1998) Oxoid: The Manual 8th Ed. Oxoid Publications Ltd

Fox, B.A. and Cameron, A.G. (1995) Food Science, Nutrition and Health 6th Ed. Hodder Arnold

Garbutt J. (1997) Essentials of Food Microbiology. Arnold Publications

Holt, J.G., Kreig, N.R., Sneath, P.H.A., Stately, J.T. and Williams, S.T. (1994) Bergey’s Manual of Determinative Bacteriology. Lippiniott Williams and Wilkins Publications

Jay, J.M. (2000) Modern Food Microbiology 6th Ed. Aspen Pub

Kirk ,R.S. and Sawyer, R. (1991) Pearson’s Composition of Foods 9th Ed. Longman Scientific and Technical

McCance and Widdowson (2002) McCance and Widdowson’s The Composition of Foods. Royal Soc. Of Chem. & MAFF

Ramsden, D.S. (1995) Biochemistry and Food Science. Stanley Thomas





Relationship to Professional Body

None




Module Specification



Module Title


Managing People

Faculty


Faculty of Media, Humanities and Technology

Department/Subject


Riseholme College / Food Manufacture

Programme(s) in which this module appears:


BSc (Hons) Food Manufacture (all routes)

BSc (Hons) Agriculture and Environment

FDSc Food Manufacture (all routes)

FDSc Agriculture and Environment

FDSc Commercial Horticulture


Code:





Credit Rating:


15

Level:


Level 1

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


Philip Considine




Module synopsis

The module has 2 primary objectives:

(1) To introduce learners to the basic people management techniques required by managers in the food industries;

(2) To encourage learners to reflect on their role and examine the skills, knowledge and attitudes required to operate effectively.

The first part of the module is designed to develop self-management and work planning skills in individuals who are in positions of responsibility in the food industries or who have aspirations to do so. The focus of the module is on the individual taking responsibility for their own personal development to enable them to manage effectively in their current sectors.

The second part of the module is about developing the skills and knowledge needed by individuals and teams to ensure the best possible results at work. It covers identifying strategies to improve team performance, the role and development of teams and individual members within the food industry and how the role contributes to improved performance.




Outline syllabus

Self development to improve performance:

Assessing performance, identifying, planning and actioning development needs, updating plans to accommodate improved performance and changing circumstances.

Managing time and resources to meet objectives.

Team building and issues impacting on teams in the food industry including change and motivation.

Identifying and meeting the development needs of teams and individuals.

Developing teams to improve performance.




Learning outcomes

On completing this module the student will be able to:

(1) Develop awareness of the fundamental principles of managing self and others;

(2) Explain how to implement, monitor and review a change programme in the workplace;

(3) Explain the role of effective communication in managing people in organisations;

(4) Explain the role that data interpretation plays in decision making and problem solving.




Teaching and Learning Strategy/Methods

Teaching methods and learning strategy will include: lectures, seminars, tutorials, group and individual study, and where appropriate within the subject, visits to appropriate food manufacturing sites or companies and invited speakers on specialist topics.

Supported distance learning students will have access to learning materials via the virtual learning network. This network will provide the student with collaborative group work, lecture notes, presentations, exercises, assessments and tutor feedback. Tutor support and access will be via telephone and/or e.mail. Study weeks will provide more formal contact with peer group members and tutors.



Assessment strategy


The learning outcomes will be assessed through coursework assessments:


Outcomes

Assessment

% Weighting

3,4

Written report – self management

40

1,2

Written report – self-improvement

40

1,4

Reflective log

20







Indicative reading

Please note that this list is as provided at the time of validation of the module. The current recommended list will be found in the relevant student handbook.

Buchanan D. and Huczynski A. (2007). Organizational Behaviour – An Introductory Text. 6th Edition. Prentice Hall.

Clegg B. (1999) Instant Time Management. Kogan Page: London.

Eales-White R. (1996). How to be a Better Team Builder. Kogan Page. London.

Forsythe P. (2000) How to Motivate People. Kogan Page. London.

Hargreaves P. (1998) The Human Resource Development Handbook. Kogan Page. London.

Pardey D. (2004) Leading Teams. ILM: Litchfield






Relationship to Professional Body


None




Module Specification


Module Title


Principles of Food Technology

Faculty


Faculty of Media, Humanities and Technology

Department/Subject


Riseholme College/Food Manufacture

Programme(s) in which this Module appears:

BSc (Hons) in Food Manufacture (all routes)

FDSc in Food Manufacture (all routes).

Code:


Will be allocated by Academic Registry once module is approved

Credit Rating:


15

Level:


Level 1

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


Amar Aouzelleg




Module synopsis

This module is designed to equip the student with an understanding of the principles of food technology which will enable the student to appreciate the breadth and complexity of the modern food industry. The emphasis is on establishing the basic requirements for an understanding of processing and preservation. Some important properties of food are established which will support understanding of various food processing technologies.




Outline syllabus

The Module will cover:

  1. Introduction to food technology: definition, organoleptic characteristics, food safety and spoilage concepts;

  2. Preliminary operations: cleaning, screening, sorting, grading, peeling;

  3. Dimension quantities and modules: SI modules, mass, density, velocity, acceleration, force, pressure, work, energy and power;

  4. Simple steady-state overall material balance;

  5. Physical properties: heat capacity, enthalpy, state of matter, sensible and latent heat, steam properties; simple steady state energy balance;

  6. Elementary flow: velocity profiles, mean velocity, flow rate, laminar turbulent flow, boundary layer.







Learning outcomes

On completion of this module the student will be able to:

  1. Describe major preliminary operations used in the food industry and explain reasons for use;

  2. Use physical quantities with confidence and use SI modules correctly;

  3. Solve simple problems involving velocity, acceleration, force, work, energy, power, heat capacity, enthalpy, state of matter, sensible and latent heat, steam properties, steady state and energy balances;

  4. Determine Reynolds number and understand significance of laminar and turbulent flow in food processing.






Teaching and Learning Strategy/Methods

Teaching methods and learning strategy will include: lectures, seminars, tutorials, group and individual study, and where appropriate within the subject, visits to appropriate food manufacturing sites or companies and invited speakers on specialist topics.


Supported distance learning students will have access to learning materials via the virtual learning network. This network will provide the student with collaborative group work, lecture notes, presentations, exercises, assessments and tutor feedback. Tutor support and access will be via telephone and/or e.mail. Study weeks will provide more formal contact with peer group members and tutors.




Assessment strategy

The learning outcomes will be assessed through coursework assessments:


Outcomes

Assessment

% Weighting

1,2,3

MCQ

40

ALL

Phase Test

60







Indicative reading

Earl, R.L. (1983) Module Operations in Food Processing. Butterworth-Heinemann

Fellows, P.J. 2000) Food Processing Technology, Principles and Practice 2nd Ed. Woodhead Publishing.

Ibarz, A. Barbosa-Canovas, G.V. (2003). Unit operations in food engineering. CRC Press.

Man, D. (2001) Shelf Life. Blackwell Science

Singh, R.P. and Heldman, D.R. (2001) Introduction to food engineering. 3rd Edition. Academic Press.

Smith, P.G. (2003 ) Introduction to Food Process Engineering. Kluwer Academic.




Relationship to Professional Body

None




Module Specification


Module Title


Principles of Food Factory Design

Faculty


Faculty of Media, Humanities and Technology

Department/Subject


Riseholme College/Food Manufacture

Programme(s) in which this Module appears:

BSc (Hons) in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement)

FDSc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement)

Code:


Will be allocated by Academic Registry once module is approved

Credit Rating:


15

Level:


Level 1

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


M. Dudbridge




Module synopsis

This module will allow the student to explore the design of food manufacturing buildings including hygienic segregation, drainage systems, floor and wall constructions. Air conditioning and air flow is also studied as part of the building design along with the routing of services and work in progress.

The design of a process to meet the needs of all the stakeholders will be studied. Constraints on the process, including capacity, cost and product quality will form the background to the development of a multi stage process development.

Automation of food manufacturing processes is studied as a way of improving the profitability of a product.




Outline syllabus

The Module will cover:

  1. The design features of a modern food manufacturing premises, such as designing the factory to meet the needs of the process, customers, employees and regulatory authorities and design of drainage systems, wall and floor constructions, air flow and ventilation requirements, process size and capacity;

  2. The total costs associated with the running of a process to include direct and indirect cost areas;

  3. Identify the cost drivers for the premises and quantify the costs using locally validated cost data;

  4. The appropriate steps in the scale up of a process to ensure that the higher output does not result in product quality becoming unacceptable, such as conducting tests to validate the scale up process;

  5. Cost benefit and risk analysis on the automation of a production process; investigate the automation of the proposed process and carry out a cost benefit analysis to decide if the automation is justified;

  6. Process control specifications with identified critical control points along with tolerances and permitted corrective actions. Process design principles will be used to decide the factory requirements;

  7. Impact on operator safety, environmental factors and overall equipment effectiveness: the process and factory will be assessed for the potential impacts.




Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module the student will be able to:

  1. Produce an outline design for a simple food factory that includes all of the basic design principles required for the type of food being produced and the complexity of the process;

  2. Explain the choices available in the design of a production facility and justify the selections made in terms of capital and running costs;

  3. Select the key design principles and conduct a presentation to a group to justify the design selected;

  4. Review the design of a food factory with which they are familiar and recommend modifications to improve performance.




Teaching and Learning Strategy/Methods

Teaching methods and learning strategy will include: lectures, seminars, tutorials, group and individual study, and where appropriate within the subject, visits to appropriate food manufacturing sites or companies and invited speakers on specialist topics.

Supported distance learning students will have access to learning materials via the virtual learning network. This network will provide the student with collaborative group work, lecture notes, presentations, exercises, assessments and tutor feedback. Tutor support and access will be via telephone and/or e.mail. Study weeks will provide more formal contact with peer group members and tutors.




Assessment strategy

The learning outcomes will be assessed through coursework assessments:


Outcomes

Assessment

% Weighting

1, 2, 3

Written report

70

1, 2, 3

Presentation

30







Indicative reading

Breyfogle, F.W. (2001) Managing 6 Sigma: A Practical guide to understanding, Assessing and Implementing the Strategy that Yields Bottom-Line Success, John Wiley Inc.

Crag, C. (1983) Hygienic Design of Food Processing Equipment, Campden Chorley Wood Research

Delbridger, R. (2000) Life on the Line in Contemporary Manufacturing: The Workplace of Lean Production and the Japanese Mode, Oxford University Press

Jowett, R. (1980) Hygienic Design and Operation of Food Plant, Ellis Horwood

Sprenger, R.A. (2004) Hygiene for Management, Highfield Publications





Relationship to Professional Body

None

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