Fdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement)




НазваниеFdsc in Food Manufacture (Process and Business Improvement)
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KEY

C and N Communication and Numeracy for Working Learners

PFSM Principles of Food Science and Microbiology

FPE Food Process Engineering

NPrD New Process Development

PFT Principles of Food Science and Technology

FPPP Food Preservation, Processing and Packaging


Level 1 Modules


Module Specification


Module Title



Policies and Markets


Faculty

Faculty of Media, Humanities and Technology


Department/Subject

Riseholme College / Food Manufacture


Programme(s) in which this module appears:


BSc (Hons) Food Manufacture (all routes)

BSc (Hons) Agriculture and Environment

FDSc Food Manufacture (all routes)

FDSc Agriculture and Environment

FDSc Commercial Horticulture


Code:


Will be allocated by Academic Registry once module is approved

Credit Rating:


15

Level:


1

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


David Stainton




Outline syllabus

The module will encourage the student to appreciate the overarching role that international agreements on trade play, in the production of food on any scale, in the UK. It is intended that the global perspectives and political dimensions, which impact on food production in the UK, be clearly outlined. This will enable the student to more easily assess the direction of the business and how to comply with the legislation and directives and the influence of the consumer. The impact of new technologies on food production will be reviewed.

To this end, the module will involve a review of the CAP and SFP scheme and an examination of how currency and exchange rate fluctuations can affect the market and business opportunities of the primary producer.

As the importance of the market grows in relation to policies, market trends and consumer requirements are intrinsically linked and the producer must be equipped with the knowledge to enable them to recognise such trends and to react accordingly. The producer must be in a position to respond to market needs and be able to identify the market prior to production.

The module will investigate the needs of retailers, the supply chain approach, the importance of local supply and the skills needed to develop value-added products, which may increase market potential. The concepts of market orientation and businesses will be explored.




Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module the student will be able to:

  1. Identify the trade agreements, which will impact on the food producer and to describe the industry in the light of global perspectives and political dimensions;

  2. Describe food related policies with examples of how fluctuations in exchange rates can impact on a business;

  3. Describe how consumer requirements, retailer demands and market trends can impact on a food production business and propose potential solutions to the issues identified;

  4. Review the effect of new technologies on food production.







Teaching and learning strategy/methods

Teaching methods and learning strategy will include: lectures, seminars, tutorials, group and individual study, and where appropriate within the subject, visits to appropriate food manufacturing sites or companies and invited speakers on specialist topics.

Supported distance learning students will have access to learning materials via the virtual learning network. This network will provide the student with collaborative group work, lecture notes, presentations, exercises, assessments and tutor feedback. Tutor support and access will be via telephone and/or e.mail. Study weeks will provide more formal contact with peer group members and tutors.





Assessment strategy




Outcome

Assessment

% Weighting

1, 2

Written assignment

30

3, 4

Individual study project

70







Indicative reading

Please note that this list is as provided at the time of validation of the module. The current recommended list will be found in the relevant student handbook.

Reading materials for this module can be found at:

www.commercialgrower.co.uk

www.defra.gov.uk

www.dunnhumby.com

www.fao.org

www.statistics.defra.org

www.wto.org

Blackwell, R.D., Miniord, P.W., Engel, J.F. (2006) Consumer Behaviour. 10th edition. Blackwell.


Bourlakis, M., Weightman, P.W.H. (2004) Food Supply Chain Management. Blackwell.


Foxall, G.R. (2005) Understanding Consumer Choice. Palgrave Macmillan.

Frewer, L and van Trijp,.H., eds, (2007) Understanding Consumers of Food Products. Woodhead.


Gustafsson, K., et al (2006) Retailing Logistics and Fresh Food Packaging: Managing Change in the Supply Chain. Kogan Page.


Hugos, M. (2003) Essentials of Supply Chain Management. Wiley & Sons.

Sarris, A. and Hallam, D., eds. (2006) Agricultural Commodity Markets and Trade: New Approaches to Analyzing Market Structure and Instability. Edward Elgar.

Soil Association (2006) Organic Market Report 2006. Soil Association.

Southgate, D.D., Graham, D.H. and Tweeten, L. (2007) The World Food Economy. Blackwell.




Relationship to professional body

None


Module Specification


Module Title

Communication and Numeracy for Working Learners


Faculty

Faculty of Media, Humanities and Technology


Department/Subject

Riseholme College / Food Manufacture


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

BSc (Hons) Food Manufacture (all routes)

BSc (Hons) Agriculture and Environment

FDSc Food Manufacture (all routes)

FDSc Agriculture and Environment

FDSc Commercial Horticulture

Code:




Credit Rating:


15

Level:


Level 1

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


Amar Aouzelleg




Module synopsis

Students will be encouraged to develop their basic statistical and mathematical knowledge in a way that will encourage confidence and equip them with the necessary skills to support their study during the programme and in the workplace. There will a strong emphasis on solving problems and presenting and interpreting results through both statistical and mathematical means. Students will be further encouraged to communicate clearly and reason logically using mathematical and statistical concepts.

During the communication elements of the module, the student will have opportunities to develop their learning, studying and presentation skills, together with both written and verbal communication skills and their ITC skills including Microsoft Word and Excel. These are essential for the personal development of the individual and for career progression.




Outline syllabus

The statistical element of the module will include: descriptive statistics such as mean, mode, range, standard deviation and variance; Mathematics to include: graphical theory, area, volume, flow-rate determination, and data interpretation.

Development of writing skills will include; identifying effective written styles, planning assignments in a working environment, use of a drafting process to develop the quality of written work, develop evaluation skills and observe correct conventions when referencing.

Presentation skills will include the recognition of the characteristics of effective presentations, selection of relevant content, use non-verbal communication effectively, prepare and use appropriate visual aids, deliver a presentation and reply to questions.

The student will also identify their own learning style and identify their study skills strengths and weaknesses and how to improve their performance in relation to themselves and others in the workplace.

Information retrieval will support the presentation and writing skills assessment tasks that require students to research information effectively.




Learning outcomes

The student will be able to:

  1. Apply basic mathematics to analyse and interpret data;

  2. Identify situations in the workplace in which they learn and study most or least effectively and produce an action plan to improve their performance.

  3. Plan, prepare and deliver an effective presentation.

  4. Plan, organise and write effective reports/essays.




Teaching and Learning Strategy/Methods

Teaching methods and learning strategy will include: lectures, seminars, tutorials, group and individual study, and where appropriate within the subject, visits to appropriate food manufacturing sites or companies and invited speakers on specialist topics.

Supported distance learning students will have access to learning materials via the virtual learning network. This network will provide the student with collaborative group work, lecture notes, presentations, exercises, assessments and tutor feedback. Tutor support and access will be via telephone and/or e.mail. Study weeks will provide more formal contact with peer group members and tutors.




Assessment strategy




Outcomes

Assessment

% Weighting

1,4

Written report

45

2

Personal reflection

5

3

Presentation (subject will be based upon the study project from the policies and markets module)

50







Indicative reading

Please note that this list is as provided at the time of validation of the module. The current recommended list will be found in the relevant student handbook.

Reading material relating to this module can be found at:

www.math.com

www.s-cool.co.uk

Berry R. (2004) The Research Project: How to Write it. 5th Edition. Routledge.

Booth V. (2002) Communicating in Science. 2nd. Edition. Cambridge University Press

Cann A.J. (2002) Maths from Scratch for Biologists John Wiley and Sons Ltd

Croft A. and Davison R. (2006) Foundation Maths 4th Edition. Prentice Hall

Coolidge.F.l. (2006) Statistics: A General Introduction. London. Sage Publications.

Daniel M. (2005) Dynamic Presentation Skills. Lulu.com.

Etherington B. (2006) Presentation Skills for Quivering Wrecks. Cyan.

Levin P. (2004) Write Great Essays! Open University Press.

McCarthy P. (2002). Presentation Skills: The Essential Guide for Students. Sage

Oyy L. and Longnecker M. (2003) A First Course in Statistical Methods Brooks Cole

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