One semester course is offered to the international students, as well as to the students of the Northern Arctic Federal University




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НазваниеOne semester course is offered to the international students, as well as to the students of the Northern Arctic Federal University
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Russian Studies

One semester course is offered to the international students, as well as to the students of the Northern Arctic Federal University.

The course has been developed in cooperation between academicians and administrative staff of the University of Tromsø: professor Jens Petter Nielsen, professor Tore Nesset, associate professor Yngvar Steinholt, associate professor Sander Goes,

and of the Northern Arctic Federal University: professor Vladislav Goldin, associate professor Tatiana Teterevleva, associate professor Natalia Kukarenko, senior lecturer Tatiana Peckisheva, senior lecturer Elena Gryaznova.

The joint work is administrated within the Bologna project. The academic coordinator of the course is associate professor Tatiana Teterevleva.


Learning outcomes

The Russian Studies course aims to stimulate the exchange program between the universities of the Nordic countries, to enable the students from abroad to get knowledge about Russian history, culture, language and society by offering them a full one-semester program at the Russian university. It is supposed that the students will get progress in studying Russia while staying in Russia and in their later work in the learning Russian subjects, the students will be in a position to work on a self-sufficient basis.


Structure

The Russian Studies course consists of 3 modules:

1. History: The Voices of Twentieth Century Russia.

2. Language: Soviet and contemporary Russian (i.e.1970 up to date).

3. Contemporary issues: Russian politics.


Description of the courses

1. History: The Voices of Twentieth Century Russia.

Work load: 10 ECTS (credits).

Type of the course: Theoretical subject. Compulsory.

Level of study/Year of study: Third year of Bachelor program.

Language of instruction and examination: English.

Examination semester: Autumn, fifth semester.

Objectives: The course is aimed to provide students with knowledge on a Russian/Soviet history from the beginning of the twentieth century to the period of Stalinism. Thematically the course suggests the studying two main streams within the Russian/Soviet history of 1900s-1920s:

PART I: The Birth of the Soviet Russia/USSR. 1900 – 1927.

PART II: "Russia Abroad": the history of the Russian emigration and the post-revolutionary Diaspora.

Contents: The Russian Revolution influenced greatly on the development of the world history in the 20th century. The purpose of the course is to comprehend the ideas, dreams, realities and results of the Soviet experiment.

The aim of the 1st part of the course is to examine the great changes in the history of Russia during the period of less than three dozens of years: the decline and crash of the Imperial Russia, the birth of the Revolutionary Russia and new cataclysm of the Russian Civil War, the creation of the Soviet Union and its development on the base of New economic policy until Stalinist "revolution from above" at the end of 1920s. Was the collapse of the Imperial Russia inevitable? What were the realities and results of the modernization process in tsarist Russia at the beginning of the XX century?

The knowledge of the new theoretical approaches and interpretations of the modern historiography of the Revolutionary Russia are of great importance for the proper understanding of the different aspects and problems of the historical process. The legacy of the Russian Civil War, a relationship between it and Stalinism, as well as other aspects, will be considered as well. In any case, the Soviet state and Soviet society received a "formative experience" during the Civil War, and it's necessary to analyze thoroughly its consequences and influence on the New economic policy period and Stalinist "revolution from above".

Among the consequences of the social-political crisis of 1917 there was mass emigration. It led to the formation of the post-revolutionary Russian Diaspora, "Russia Abroad". "Russia Abroad" is considered to be the unique historical phenomenon. The émigrés' shared belief in their historical mission to keep and to cherish the values, traditions and culture of pre-revolutionary Russia created a base for the social and cultural entity, a sort of a "society in exile". Its political and cultural heritage forms a necessary part of the Russian history and culture. That's why to study "Russia Abroad" is necessary to understand the history of Russia in the XX century.

Teaching methods:

The teaching takes the form of 15 lectures coming to a total of 30 academic hours of education.

Schedule:

1. Late imperial Russia: between reforms and revolutions. Searching for the new understanding (2 acad. hours).

2. The Russian Revolution of 1917 and building of the Soviet state. New approaches (6 acad. hours).

3. Civil War in Russia and the world (6 acad. hours).

4. Soviet society under NEP (6 acad. hours).

5. "The liquid element of Russian history": Russian emigration, its characteristic features and peculiarities. "The waves" of the emigration from Russia. The main sources and historiography (2 acad. hours).

6. "Gone by the evil fate": post-revolutionary Russian emigration, its stages, destinations and parameters. The problem of the post-revolutionary émigrés in international relations (2 acad. hours).

7. "We are a part of the Russian nation": the social and cultural life of the post-revolutionary Russian Diaspora. "Russia Abroad", its centres and periphery (2 acad. hours).

8. "To fight for Motherland's Renaissance": emigrant military and political doctrines. Philosophy, social and political thought and political struggle in "Russia Abroad" (4 acad. hours).

Exam and assessment:

The exam consists of two parts: one course assignment of appr.5-6 pages submitted mid-term; 4-hour university-based written exam at the end of the term.

The results of the assignment and the exam are considered jointly and equally for the final grade: A-E=pass and F=fail.

Date(s) of written examination:

December 10, 2012. The exam date is preliminary and may be subject to change.

Lecturers:

Vladislav Goldin, Professor. E-mail: goldin@pomorsu.ru

Taiana Teterevleva, Ass. Professor. E-mail: tat.tet2010@gmail.com

Recommended reading/syllabus:

Course books (the students can choose between 2 alternatives):

Marples, David R. Lenin's Revolution: Russia, 1917 - 1921 (Harlow, 2000) p. 1 – 137.

Service, Robert. A History of Twentieth-Century Russia (Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1998), p. 1 - 165.

Compulsory reading (the reader will be provided for every student upon the arrival):

Action, Edward; Cherniaev, Vladimir Iu.; Rosenberg, William G. (eds.). Critical Companion to the Russian Revolution 1914 - 1921 (Arnold, 1997), part I, p. 3 - 36; part II, p. 37 - 47, 81 - 92, 93 - 105, 106 - 114; part IV, p. 231 - 244; part V, p. 303 - 313; part VII, p. 645 - 658.

Andrle, Vladimir. A Social History of Twentieth-Century Russia (Edward Arnold, London - New York,1994),ch.1, p. 1-24; ch.3, p. 61 - 85.

Badcock, Sarah. Autocracy in Crisis: Nicholas the last. In: Late Imperial Russia. Problems and Prospects (Manchester University Press, Manchester and New York, 2005), p. 9 - 27.

Brovkin, Vladimir N. Introduction: New Tasks in the Study of the Russian Revolution and War. In: Vladimir N. Brovkin (ed.). The Bolsheviks in Russian Society. The Revolution and the Civil Wars (Yale University Press, New Haven and London, 1997), p. 1 - 21.

Chinyaeva, Elena. Russians Outside Russia: The Émigré Community in Chekhoslovakia, 1918-1938 (München, R. Oldenbourg Verlag, 2001), p. 19-40; 69-85; 103-144; 185-212.

Cohen, Aaron J. Oh, That! Myth, Memory, and World War I in the Russian Emigration and the Soviet Union. In: Slavic Review, Vol. 62, No. 1 (Spring 2003), p. 69-86.

Felshtinsky, Yuri. The Legal Foundations of the Immigration and Emigration Policy of the USSR, 1917-1927. In: Soviet Studies, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Jul., 1982), p. 327-348.

Fitzpatrick, Sheila. New Perspectives on the Civil War. In: Diana P. Koenker, William G. Rosenberg and Ronald Grigor Suny (eds.). Party, State and Society in the Russian Civil War (Indiana University Press, 1989), p. 3 - 23.

Fitzpatrick, Sheila. The Legacy of the Civil War. In: Diana P. Koenker, William G. Rosenberg and Ronald Grigor Suny (eds.). Party, State and Society in the Russian Civil War (Indiana University Press, 1989), p. 385 - 397.

Nielsen, Jens Petter. Tilbake til Russland! In: Ergo: Tidsskrift for kultur- og samfunnssporsmal, 1982, No. 2, p. 49-63.

Raeff, Marc. Russia Abroad: A Cultural History of the Russian Emigration, 1919-1939 (Oxford University Press, 1990), p. 3-46; 95-117.

Read, Christopher. In Search of Liberal Tsarism: The Historiography of Autocratic Decline. In: The Historical Journal, 45,1 (2002), p. 195 - 210.

Siegelbaum, Lewis H. Soviet State and Society between Revolutions, 1918 - 1929 (Cambridge, 1992), ch.4 - 5, p. 135 - 229.

Slobin, Greta N. The "Homecoming" of the First Wave Diaspora and Its Cultural Legacy. In: Slavic Review, Vol. 60, No. 3 (Autumn, 2001), p. 513-529.

Suny, Ronald Grigor. Revision and Retreat in the Historiography of the 1917: Social History and Its Critics. In: The Russian Review, Vol.53, No.2 (April 1994), p. 165 - 182.

Swoboda, Victor. Was the Soviet Union Really Necessary? In: Soviet Studies. Vol.44, No.5, 1992, p. 761 - 784.

Waldron, Peter. Between Two Revolutions. Stolypin and the Politics of Renewal in Russia (Northern Illinois University Press, 1998), ch. 2, p. 51 - 93.

Williams, Robert C. European Political Emigrations: A Lost Subject. In: Comparative Studies in Society and History, Vol. 12, No. 2 (Apr., 1970), p. 140-148.

Recommended reading (non-compulsory):

Bakich, Olga. Émigré Identity: The Case of Harbin. In: The South Atlantic Quarterly, Vol. 99, No. 1 (Winter 2001).

Baschmakoff, N.; Leinonen, M. Russian Life in Finland 1917 - 1939: A Local and Oral History. (Studia Slavica Finlandensia, T. XVIII, Helsinki, 2001).

Broadberry, Stephen; Harrison, Mark (eds). The Economics of World War I (Cambridge, 2005), ch.8, p. 235 - 275.

DeKalb, H.H. Coming to terms with the Soviet regime: the "Changing signposts" movement among Russian emigres in the early 1920 (IL: Northern Illinois University Press. Paulsen, M. 1993).

Glad, John. Russia Abroad: Writers, history, politics (Tenafly, NJ: Hermitage and Birchbark Press, 1999).

Johnston, Robert Harold. New Mecca, New Babylon... : Paris and the Russian Exiles, 1920 - 1945 (McGill-Queen's Press, Kingston, 1988).

Kappeler, Andreas. The Russian Empire: A Multiethnic History (Longman, 2001), ch.9, p. 328 - 369.

Kolonitskii, Boris Ivanovich. 'Democracy as Identification: Towards the Study of Political Consciousness during the February Revolution. In: Palat, Madhavan K. (ed.). Social Identities in Revolutionary Russia (Palgrave, 2001), p. 174 - 208.

Nielsen, Jens Petter. Miljukov and Stalin. P. N. Miljukov's political evolution in emigration (1918-1943) (Oslo: Universitetet i Oslo, Slavisk-Baltisk Institutt, 1983).

Pipes, Richard. Struve: Liberal on the Right, 1905 - 1944 (Cambridge, 1980).

Raymond, Boris. The Russian Diaspora, 1917 - 1941 (Lanham, 2000).

Robinson, Paul. The White Russian Army in Exile, 1920-1941 (Oxford : Clarendon Press, 2002).

Shlapentokh, Dmitry. Eurasianism: Past and Present. In: Communist and Post-Communist Studies, Vol. 30, No. 2 (1997), p. 129-151.

Stephan, John. The Russian fascists: Tragedy and Farce in Exile. 1925 - 1945 (N.Y., 1978).

Wade, Rex A. (ed.). Revolutionary Russia. New Approaches (Routledge, New York and London, 2004), p. 1 - 265.

Williams, Robert С. "Changing Landmarks" in Russian Berlin, 1922-1924. In: Slavic Review, Vol. 27, No. 4 (Dec., 1968), p. 581-593.

Williams, Robert С. Culture in exile: Russian émigrés in Germany 1881 - 1941 (London, 1972).


2. Soviet and contemporary Russian (i.e.1970 to date)

Work load: 10 ECTS (credits)

Type of the course: Practically-based. Compulsory.

Level of study/Year of study: Third year of Bachelor program

Language of instruction and examination: Russian and English.

Examination semester: Autumn, fifth semester

Objectives: In their later work in Russian subjects, the students will be in a position to work on an self-sufficient basis with, and retrieve the desired information from most types of sources and texts in Soviet and contemporary Russian (i.e.1970 up to date).

Contents: A survey in linguistic (including translation) and actual terms of Russian non-fiction of a normal standard of difficulty.

Teaching methods:

The teaching takes the form of 25 classes coming to a total of 50 academic hours of education.

The teaching consists of working through texts, exercises, corrections and the completion of homework assignments. The assignments will consist of translating texts from Russian to Norwegian and writing paraphrases or summaries of Russian texts, together with possibly answering questions on set texts.

In addition to a general study competence, it is required that the student should have passed the examination in RUS-1020 Russian texts and conversation 1 and RUS-2020 Russian texts and conversation 2, or documentation of an equivalent competence.

Exam and assessment:

The examination is in two parts and consists of a portfolio with four assignments, and a 3-hour University-based written examination at the end of the term.

The results of the assignments and the exam are considered jointly and equally for the final grade: A-E=pass and F=fail.

The portfolio assessment consists of:

1) 2 summaries in Norwegian or English of the texts from the syllabus. The summaries should be about 1 A4 page each;

2) 2 translations of texts from the curriculum from Russian into Norwegian/English. Analysis of style and genre, as well as the identification and discussion of the rhetoric and polemic dimensions of the texts is supposed to be included. The theme and scope of the assignment(s) to be handed in will be decided in consultation with the academic teacher.

The portfolio is to be handed in at least one week before the final exam.

Date(s) of written examination:

December 14, 2012. The exam date is preliminary and may be subject to change.

Recommended reading/syllabus:

Available on request.

Lecturer:

Elena Gryaznova, Senior Lecturer of the Preparatory Department for Foreign Students.

E-mail: helen-zosya@mail.ru




3. Russian Politics.

Work load: 10 ECTS (credits).

Type of the course: Theoretical subject. Compulsory.

Level of study/Year of study: Third year of Bachelor program.

Language of instruction: English.

Examination semester: Autumn, fifth semester.

Objectives: Students who successfully completed the course should have achieved the following learning outcomes:

Knowledge and understanding:

  • Understand the basic principles of Russia’s political system, and apply these principles to examples of contemporary political life in Russia.

  • Knowledge of fundamental terms and notions, necessary for comparative analysis of contemporary politics (political theory, political institutions, security, state, legislation, political power, equality, nation)

Skills:

  • Make use of scholarly knowledge to work independently on relevant problems and questions

  • Give an account of the basic principles of Russian politics and how they might contribute to our more general understanding of the Russian society.

  • Students should be able to explore Russian scientific and informational resources which increases the variety of opinions and provide alternative points of view.

Contents:

The general objective is to examine the basic principles of Russian politics. Special attention during the course is given to the processes in contemporary political life in Russia. The course is divided in three main blocks, each addressing different topics: (I) a brief introduction in Russia’s political system, (II) the interaction between the Russian society and the state and (III) Russian foreign policy. Students are encouraged to develop their own interests such as examining the constitutional developments, party formation and/or political personalities.

Teaching methods:

The teaching takes the form of 9 lectures and 1 seminar coming to a total of 20 academic hours of education.

Schedule:

Part I: An introduction in Russia’s political system (elections and federal- and regional politics)

Lecture I: The presidency and political leadership. Literature: Brown (ed.), pp. 9-96).

Lecture II: Elections and the electoral system. Literature: Brown (ed.), pp. 151-178; 195-209; 530-545; “Prokhorov could be Putin 2.0”; “Vladimir Putin in a world of risks and danger”; “Why Russia’s next president deserves our sympathy”.

Lecture III: Federalism, Regionalism, and local government. Literature: Brown (ed.), pp. 369-397; Shalyov (2010).

Part II: The interaction between the Russian s0ciety and the state (legislation, civil society and gender issues).

Lecture IV: The legislature and the law in Russia. Literature: Brown (ed.), pp. 99-120, 131-138.

Lecture V: Society and domestic policy. Literature: Brown (ed.), pp. 289-342.

Lecture VI: Russian statehood and civil society. Literature: Brown (ed.), pp. 345-366; Pursiainen and Patomäki (2004); Richter (2009); Skedsmo (2005).

Lecture VII: Gender issues in Russia. Literature: Stuvøy (2010); Kulmala (2010).

Part III: Russian Foreign Policy

Lecture VIII: Russian Foreign Policy. Literature: Ivanov (2011); Shadrina (2010).

Lecture IX: Russian Arctic Policy. Literature: Alexandrov (2009); Hønneland and Jørgensen (2005); Jensen and Skedsmo (2010).

Lecture X: Seminar including film.

Exam and assessment:

A 4-hour University-based, closed-book examination. The grade will be on a scale from A to F, where F is a fail. The course allows the students the opportunity to re-sit their examination in the following semester.

The course is assessed once every programme-period with both in-progress and final evaluations. Moreover, evaluation is undertaken orally to allow students and teacher to establish a dialogue concerning the possibility and/or need for changes and improvements. In order to participate in the written exam, the students need to conduct a presentation of a selected topic during a seminar.

Date(s) of written examination:

December 5, 2012. The exam date is preliminary and may be subject to change.

Lecturers:

Sander Goes, Associate Professor. E-mail: sander.goes@uit.no

Natalia Kukarenko, Associate Professor. E-mail: n.kukarenko@narfu.ru

Recommended reading/syllabus:

Bacon, Edwin and Wyman, Matthew (2010). Contemporary Russia (Contemporary States and Societies Series). Palgrave Macmillan (general literature, 239 pages).

Contemporary Russian Politics. A reader (2001). Ed. by Archie Brown. Oxford University press (selected pages).

Shadrina Elena (2010). Russia’s foreign energy policy: Paradigm shifts within the geographical context of Europe, Central Eurasia and Northeast Asia. The Norwegian Institute for Defense studies (50 pages).

Stuvøy, Kirsti (2010). Symbolic Power and (In)Security: The Marginalization of Women’s Security in Northwest Russia. International Political Sociology 4, 401-418 (17 pages).

Alexandrov, Oleg (2009). Labyrinths of the Arctic Policy. Russia in Global Affairs No. 3, July-September (12 pages). http://eng.globalaffairs.ru/number/n_1359.

Ivanov, Igor (2011). What Diplomacy Does Russia Need in the 21st Century? Russia in Global Affairs, October-December (5 pages). http://eng.globalaffairs.ru/number/What-Diplomacy-Does-Russia-Need-in-the-21st-Century-15420.

Hønneland, Geir and Jørgensen, Jørgen Holten (2005). Federal Environmental Governance and the Russian North. Polar Geography, 29, No. 1, pp. 27-42 (17 pages).

Pursiainen, Christer and Patomäki, Heikki (2004). The State and Society in contemporary Russian Political Thought. Egle Rindzeviciute (ed.) Contemporary change in Russia. Sodertörns University Stockholm (volume chapter) (39 pages).

Skedsmo, Pål (2005). Doing go0d in Murmansk, Civil Society, ideology and Everyday practices in a Russian Environmental NGO. FNI Rapport 14, pp. 15-36 (21 pages).

Jensen, Leif Christian and Skedsmo Pål (2010). Approaching the North: Norwegian and Russian foreign policy discourses on the European Arctic. Polar Research, (12 pages).

Shalyov, Andre (2010). Unstable equilibrium. Russian regions versus federal centre. Talking Barents: People, borders and regional cooperation. Ed. by A. Stålesen. The Norwegian Barents Secretariat, Kirkenes, pp. 111-124 (12 pages).

Richter, James (2009). Putin and the Public Chamber. Post-Soviet Affairs, 25,1, pp. 39-65 (27 pages).

Kulmala, Meri (2010). Woman Rule This Country: Women’s Community Organizing and Care in Rural Karelia. Anthropology of East Europe Review 28(2), Fall. pp. 164-185 (22 pages).

“Prokhorov could be Putin 2.0 – Russian analysts” http://rt.com/politics/prokhorov-putin-russian-political-833/

“Vladimir Putin in a world of risks and danger” http://rt.com/online-exclusive/russian-presidential-election-2012/

“Why Russia’s next president deserves our sympathy”. http://rt.com/politics/columns/unpredictable-world-foreign-lukyanov/putin-elections-russia-foreign/

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