Student warning: This course syllabus is from a previous semester archive and serves only as a preparatory reference. Please use this syllabus as a reference




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STUDENT WARNING: This course syllabus is from a previous semester archive and serves only as a preparatory reference. Please use this syllabus as a reference only until the professor opens the classroom and you have access to the updated course syllabus. Please do NOT purchase any books or start any work based on this syllabus; this syllabus may NOT be the one that your individual instructor uses for a course that has not yet started. If you need to verify course textbooks, please refer to the online course description through your student portal.

This syllabus is proprietary material of APUS.






MILS 620
Studies in
Future War
3-
Credit Hour
16-Week
Course

Graduate students are encouraged to take required or core courses prior to enrolling in the seminars, concentration courses or electives.




Table of Contents




Instructor Information

Evaluation Procedures

Course Description

Grading Scale

Course Scope

Course Outline

Course Objectives

Policies

Course Delivery Method

Academic Services

Course Materials

Selected Bibliography




Course Description (Catalog)


This course considers the nature of future military conflict, the history of future war doctrine, and the impact of current conflict on the conceptualization of the “next war.” Students examine current, past, and future low-intensity, as well as high-intensity conflicts, and the appropriate use of military force in the power projection role to influence a diplomatic resolution to a conflict. Rogue nations, and related cultural clashes, and religious factors are related to planning for future war.


Table of Contents



Course Scope



The only sure guide to the future is the past. By definition the future is unknowable and, therefore, uncertain. While history does not repeat, it does offer us a guide and possible scenarios for the future. As such, this course will consider the future within its historical context. It is designed to acquaint students with the potential casual factors, nature, and strategies for war in the near future and beyond.

Table of Contents

Course Objectives


Upon completion of Studies in Future War students will be able to:


CO-1. Assess the key factors and indicators with the greatest potential to influence the international and national security environments in the near future.


CO-2. Assess the existing and predicted threats to the international and national security environments.


CO-3. Analyze the existing and predicted strategies to address those threats.


CO-4. Evaluate the fundamental and functional differences, as well as similarities, between wars of the future and those of the past.


CO-5. Assimilate the doctrinal necessities for future war and evaluate them in analytical essays.

Table of Contents

Course Delivery Method


This History and Military Studies course is delivered via distance learning and enables students to complete academic work in a flexible manner, completely online. Course materials and access to an online learning management system are made available to each student.


Online assignments are usually due by Sunday midnight each week (may vary based on the type of weekly learning activities) and must include Discussion Board questions (accomplished in groups through linear, threaded or roundtable discussion board forums), examinations and quizzes (graded electronically), and individual written assignments (submitted for review to the faculty member).


In online courses we construct knowledge not just by completing readings and assignments. An important part of the process is communicating with classmates and learning from what they have to say. As such, we need to share online conversations about ideas.


Direct interaction between faculty members and students is a key feature of the educational experience.  For that reason, faculty members have a responsibility to ensure that students interact with fellow students and the course instructor during the course as specified in the course syllabus, and can contact the instructor during posted office hours.  The faculty member should initiate contact if a student is absent from class and makes no attempt to contact the faulty member during the week.  This is especially important if the student fails to make contact at the start of the course. Students are dropped from the class if they do not log into the classroom during the first week of class.


Students are expected to submit classroom assignments by the posted due date and to complete the course according to the published class schedule. As adults, students, and working professionals we understand you must manage competing demands on your time. Should you need additional time to complete an assignment please contact the faculty before the due date so you can discuss the situation and determine an acceptable resolution. Routine submission of late assignments is unacceptable and may result in points deducted from your final course grade.

Table of Contents

Course Materials


All students majoring in any field of history should have a mastery of online research methods; these include researching appropriate primary resources through the Web, belonging to relevant professional discussion forums, and understanding the Historiographical literature for this course so that they can do required assignments involving research. Faculty must actively encourage students to:


  • Demonstrate the proper techniques for conducting advanced online historical research, with initial focus through The Online Library.

  • Locate and evaluate online primary and secondary source materials.

  • Identify errors and apply corrective measures in online historical research methodologies.

  • Explore existing literature and digital archives in support of research interests.



Historical skills in a possible developmental history curriculum: The example of primary sources involves:


Analytical Skills


100 Level

200 Level

300 Level

400 Level

Dealing with evidence: Primary sources

Discriminate between a primary and a secondary source and their uses in research. Learn how to analyze/question a primary source: Who wrote it, when, why, its audience, its historical context, inferences that can be drawn from it, etc. In other words, students will comprehend how to extract information from artifacts and relate it to broader course themes.

Recognize the place, time, and human agency behind the production of a primary source.


Interpret human agency in the context of how an artifact from the past was produced and of the times in which it was produced.

Evaluate the trustworthiness of sources.

Compare and contrast diverse and potentially conflicting primary sources for a single historical problem.

Develop relationships among multiple sources and synthesize the major connecting issues among them.

Bottlenecks and difficulties for students in acquiring those skills

Recognizing the variety of primary sources and interpreting them.

Re-creating historical context and connecting it to a document. Beginning to empathize with people from another place and time.

Re-creating historical context and connecting it to a document.

•Identifying and empathizing with people from another place and time.

Dealing with ambiguity and contradiction in historical sources.

Recognizing major points in primary and secondary sources.

Producing some sense through connecting multiple sources.


This table shows primary-source analysis skills that history instructors can teach their undergraduate students and the difficulties that students encounter when learning them. Instructors gradually teach students more difficult skills as they progress from introductory to advanced courses. Source: Developmental curriculum created by Arlene Díaz, Joan Middendorf, David Pace, and Leah Shopkow for the Indiana University Department of History, fall 2007, based on Lorin W. Anderson and David R. Krathohl, eds., A Taxonomy of Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (New York, 2001). See: The History Learning Project


As indicated by successful completion of research and writing requirements, students should also demonstrate proficiency in Web navigation, including exploration of the evolving environment of the “Invisible College, primary resources, historical research sites, and such advanced web applications as:



  • Web 2.0: H-Net offers the most established forum for scholarly communications, but may be augmented by other discussion groups, blogs, wikis, or Second Life-type of experience.

  • Graduate students, must explore the research holdings of The Online Library, Department’s Study Portals History and Military Studies, and their ability to support research needs.  Each student may be required to write a scholarly review of a particular research issue, with specific attention afforded to:

  • Online Scholarly Journals: Students will identify and monitor the key refereed journals in their research area as part of their ongoing scholarly portfolio; and

  • Electronic Books/Subject Clusters: Students will identify key texts or clusters or resources (e.g., Praeger Security International) in their research area and explore the electronic researching ability for such genre as a complement to print-based immersion.

  • University libraries, including the APUS Online Library, national libraries, and college professors have created major sites with information resources, links to other trusted sites, and electronic networking potential.  Students will determine appropriate archival repositories and government agencies for their research interests. Students are expected to learn about archival research and the use of government documents, but also advanced Web tools like Encoded Archival Description, finding aids and associated online searching tools for government and academic sites. While certainly not inclusive – as the student is expected to conduct their own independent research – examples and links to relevant sites include:


REQUIRED TEXTS


The following texts are required reading for this class:


  • Philip Bobbitt. Terror and Consent: The Wars for the Twenty-First Century. New York, NY: Random House, 2008.

  • Colin S. Gray. Another Bloody Century: Future Warfare. London, UK: Phoenix, 2005.

  • Robert Kagan. The Return of History and the End of Dreams. New York, NY: Random House, 2008.

  • Walid Phares. The Confrontation: Winning the War against Future Jihad. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.

  • John Robb. Brave New War: The Next Stage of Terrorism and the End of Globalization. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2007.


The following texts are recommended reading for this class:


  • Thomas P.M. Barnett. The Pentagon’s New Map: War and Peace in the Twenty-First Century. New York, NY: Berkley Books, 2004.

  • Thomas P.M. Barnett. Blueprint for Action: A Future Worth Creating. New York, NY: Berkley Books, 2005.

  • Ralph Peters. Wars of Blood and Faith: The Conflicts That Will Shape the Twenty-First Century. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 2007.

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