Faculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies




НазваниеFaculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies
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1.3 Admission with Specific Credit



Two routes through the programme accept students for entry with specific credit in the fields of education and major incident management. Students accessing these two routes will be expected to have completed a postgraduate certificate in a relevant subject.


Normally a student shall not be admitted with specific credit to a point more than half way through the Programme unless there is a close match between the student’s prior learning and the requirements of the Programme.


1.4 Accreditation of Prior (Experiential) Learning (AP(E)L)


As the majority of students applying for APL will have clear evidence of previous study from other Higher Education Institutes (HEI), the programme endeavours to make the APL process a relatively simple procedure. However, in no case is APL automatic and all cases will be considered on an individual basis.


The programme’s AP(E)L policy and procedure builds upon the MMU scheme for the admission of students with advanced standing following accreditation of prior learning (MMU, 2005) and is congruent with QAA guidance. It is set out in the form of guidance for students and academics (this guidance will be available to applicants on the faculty website and on request).


The programme is committed to honouring previously confirmed accredited study, usually achieved within the last five years preceding entry to the programme, providing that the study fits in with the pattern of units to be studied within the programme (normally 20-credit units) and has broadly comparable outcomes. No more than 60 credits will be accredited against Phase 1 work and no more than 50% of work entitling a student to exit with the award of a Postgraduate Certificate.


The student must provide details of the course undertaken and evidence of achievement.


1.5 Relationship with the University Foundation Year


Not applicable


2 CURRICULUM DESIGN AND ORGANISATION


2.1 Curriculum Design and Overview


  1. FLEXIBILITY

The programme is designed to offer some flexibility in the choice of units to be studied while preserving a core of teaching and learning in emergency medicine. Students will be enabled to develop education or major incident management focuses and may indeed have commenced these studies outside the programme and, through APL, access this programme to undertake further study. The AP(E)L strategy allows prior learning to be incorporated into the student’s programme. Some units are available as stand-alone units to other students engaged in emergency care settings.


  1. DIVERSITY

By offering students choice in their diet of study, they will experience diverse learning opportunities. Diversity in the student experience is also enabled by an assessment strategy that, where appropriate, encourages students to critically apply their learning to professional practice and its further development. Students will bring onto the programme their own diverse experiences depending on their culture and background. This expertise will be used within the programme to enhance the learning of all students. International students involved in the programme will be encouraged to focus and reflect upon their own cultural experiences of medical practice and where different legal systems apply they will be expected to refer to and reflect on these.


  1. INCLUSIVITY

The programme allows for interdisciplinary learning within the field of emergency medicine / care.


  1. EMPLOYABILITY

The majority of students (with the exception of some full-time students) will be in current employment. Some will be using higher education to pursue a definitive career path; others will be hoping that it enhances their opportunities for career advancement. Other students will be using it to fulfil GMC stipulation for evidence of CPD and some may be studying for personal development and satisfaction purposes.


  1. QUALITY ENHANCEMENT

The programme will enable its students to pursue the goal of excellence within their practice of life-long learning. Where appropriate and through the students efforts, learning outcomes are focused within a context of organisational development.


  1. RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP AND REFLECTIVE PRACTICE

The programme and the units within it are designed to enable the student to pursue and use research in practice and to embed both scholarship and reflection within their practice environment


2.1.1 Curriculum Structure


The programme consists of a number of units in Phase 1 that cover clinical emergency medicine (6 units), managerial (3 units) research (2 units) and other elective (2 units) areas of emergency care from which the student can select a personalised route for academic assessment.


In Phase 1, each student will undertake 120 credits, which will include two Core Option clinical units and one Core Option research unit together with an additional 60 credits from any units within the programme or approved electives from other programmes.


It is envisaged that most emergency physicians in training will undertake the 60 core option credits from within the programme. However, it is also recognised that the future of emergency medicine requires some diversity of skills and knowledge and in order to facilitate this, and provide links to existing MMU programmes and a programme in development with partners, the programme has been designed with a number of specialist exit awards. These exit awards will allow students who wish to focus on management, education or major incident management (areas of major importance to the future direction of emergency care), to complete a programme of study with an emergency medicine focus and to exit the programme with an appropriate award.


The Phase 2 dissertation (60 credits) will involve students presenting a substantial practitioner project in the field of emergency medicine in an area of their choice. This final piece of work will include a clinical topic review pertinent to the project, a project report and a draft paper for publication derived from the project. If students are undertaking the a named route through the programme [MSc Emergency Medicine (with Education) or MSc Emergency Medicine (Major Incident Management)] they will be required to produce a project with a focus on this area.


Exit Awards


Students exiting with PgCert

In order to exit with the generic award of PgCert Emergency Medicine, the student must complete 60 Core Option credits, which consist of two clinical and one research unit of their choice (the core option requirements). Details of units that students can select are provided in the curriculum map below.


The PgCert Emergency Management has been developed for those senior staff in Emergency Departments who may have completed their professional training but want a postgraduate qualification which reflects their management function. These students will be required to undertake the three 20 credit management units:


  • Human Resource Management in the Emergency Department

  • Legal Aspects of Emergency Medicine

  • Managing the Emergency Department



Students exiting with PgDip

The exit award of PgDip Emergency Medicine will follow the completion of 120 credits to include the 60 Core Option units (two clinical and one research unit) and 60 other credits from any units within the programme.


Two additional exit awards have been offered for those students who access the programme having undertaken relevant PgCert elsewhere and want to specialise in emergency medicine. These are:



  • PgDip Emergency Medicine (with Education)

Students who choose an education route through this programme will bring 60 credits to the programme in the form of a Postgraduate Certificate in Education. They will complete the core requirements for Phase 1 of this programme and will be able to exit at that point with an award of a PgDip Emergency Medicine (with Education).


  • PgDip Emergency Medicine (Major Incident Management)

Students who wish to focus on Major Incident Management will bring 60 credits to the programme in the form of a Postgraduate Certificate in Major Incident Management. They will complete the core requirements for Phase 1 of this programme and be able to exit at that point with an award of PgDip Emergency Medicine (Major Incident Management).


Exit with MSc Emergency Medicine – with or without named route

The final award of MSc Emergency Medicine will result from successful completion of 60 Core Option units plus 60 Elective units from Phase 1 plus the 60-credit unit from Phase 2.


To gain the named award MSc Emergency Medicine (with Education), students must come into the programme with a post graduate certificate in Education (60 level 7 credits), complete the 60 Core Option credits and complete the Phase 2 unit with an assessment focused on education in emergency medicine.


To gain the named award MSc Emergency Medicine (Major Incident Management), students must come into the programme with a Postgraduate Certificate in Major Incident Management (60 level 7 credits), complete the 60 Core Option credits and complete the Phase 2 unit with an assessment focused on the impact of major incident management on emergency care.



Unit

Credits




Core Option Requirements

Assessment

Phase 1

Acute Medical Emergencies 1

20

Clinical

In order to complete phase 1 it will be necessary to have successfully completed 2 clinical units and 1 research unit (including project proposal). 60 credits can be from any other approved units.

However, those students choosing the PgCert Emergency Management Route will undertake a mandatory core of the three Management units.

2 reflective evidence-based case studies of 2250 words each

Surgical Emergencies

20

Clinical

Paediatric Emergencies

20

Clinical

Trauma Emergencies

20

Clinical

Acute Medical Emergencies 2

20

Clinical

Psychosocial Emergencies

20

Clinical

Legal Aspects of Emergency Medicine

20

Management

A short answer question paper of seen and unseen scenarios equivalent to 4,500 words.

Human Resource Management in the Emergency Department

20

Management

A 4,500 word assignment setting out person specification, job description, induction and training programmes for one new role in the Emergency Department

Managing the Emergency Department

20

Management

A 4500 word assignment considering the current constraints and drivers affecting the management of Emergency Care

Evidence-based Emergency Practice

20

Research

A 4,500 word Project proposal or 2 Best BETs with extended methodology (4,500 Words total)

Study Design and Execution in Emergency Medicine

20

Research

Project Proposal (4,500 Words)

Major Incident Management

20

Major incident

A 4,500 word risk based site assessment.

Emergency Life Support

40

Life Support

2 reflective case studies of 2,250 words from two of cardiac, paediatric and trauma resuscitation PLUS 1 evidence-based case study of 4,500 words from the third area.

Phase 2




Phase 2 Project

60







3000 words Clinical Topic Review PLUS

15000 word Project report PLUS

2-3000 word Draft paper for publication derived from the project


It will not be possible to deliver all units each academic year. There will be a minimum of 120 credits available each but this may result in limited choice for full time students. The following table is an example of how units are likely to be offered:


Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Acute Medical Emergencies 1

Paediatric Emergencies

Acute Medical Emergencies 2

Trauma Emergencies

Surgical Emergencies

Psychosocial Emergencies

Legal Aspects of Emergency Medicine

Human Resource Management in the Emergency Department

Managing the Emergency Department

Evidence-based Emergency Practice

Study Design and Execution in Emergency Medicine

Evidence-based Emergency Practice

Major Incident Management

Major Incident Management

Major Incident Management

Emergency Life Support

Emergency Life Support

Emergency Life Support


2.2 Relationship to Subject Benchmark Statement(s)


Whilst there are no programme-specific subject benchmark statements for M-level programmes, the programme team have taken the College of Emergency Medicine Curriculum for Specialist Training in Emergency Medicine (2006) into consideration when developing this curriculum and, in Appendix 1, have mapped the units against the relevant sections of the curriculum.


2.3 Assessment Criteria for Marking Schemes


2.3.1 Generic Criteria

All summative assessment within the programme will be marked in accordance with the University’s marking scheme, based on the following grading bands: 0-44, 45-49, 50 to 59, 60-69, ≥70%, aligning with the associated generic descriptors as specified in the Regulations for Taught Postgraduate Programmes of Study.


Unit grading criteria for all Masters level units


All these grading criteria are supplemented by specific assessment guidance provided in unit guides, as follows.


Grade and Percentage Mark


Criteria


Distinction

70-100%


To pass with distinction, the student must not only clearly meet all the criteria for a pass, but do so while demonstrating:

  • the ability to integrate a wide range of different kinds of knowledge from within and outside the practice/discipline area

  • high levels of debate

  • Highly developed skills of critical analysis

  • The ability to exercise independent judgement in an informed and critical way

  • Evidence of original thought and generation of new ideas

  • The ability to sustain innovative work and to handle information in novel ways




Merit

60-69%

Meets the criteria for a pass rigorously (as below).

Pass

50-59%


Meets the criteria for a pass but with some limitations.


To pass at this level the student will have met the specific learning outcomes fully and will have:

  • interpreted the instructions provided to produce a critical and balanced review of the issues;

  • organised and structured arguments based on their own independent study

  • used appropriate resources and quotes in supporting arguments, referencing all sources correctly

  • provided evidence of a wide range of relevant and up to date reading material and used this in the arguments presented

  • demonstrated the interaction between academic input and practitioner/subject issues

  • provided not only an understanding but also an application of course work and private study together with a critical analysis of practitioner/discipline experience

  • make informed judgements, about conclusions to be drawn from the findings of their own independent study, in relation to their area/field of practice/study generally

  • integrated understanding of course work with a critical review of practice/field, in a manner original to their own professional/academic experience

  • knowledge and understanding will be informed by the forefront of the discipline and although some gaps in knowledge and understanding may be demonstrated, they will not be crucial to the field of study

  • demonstrate a level of debate relating to the issue under discussion, rather than having merely presenting a balanced case for a given position in relation to this issue.




Grade and Percentage Mark


Criteria


Marginal Fail

45-49%

This piece of work either fails to meet the learning outcomes or lacks organisation to the extent that interpretation is difficult. There may be little critical analysis and/or argument demonstrated.

Considerable gaps in knowledge and understanding are likely to be evident.

There may be some coverage of relevant information with substantial amounts of irrelevant and/or inaccurate information. Key points of information are missed and there is superficial coverage of remaining information.

Basic referencing with some errors.

Fail

0-44%


The work is mainly descriptive with considerable gaps in knowledge and understanding likely to be evident.

There may be profound misunderstanding of the task and of information demonstrated.

No relevant material.

Referencing mainly irrelevant or absent, mainly or completely inadequate, mainly or completely incorrect.

Poor quality. Structure highly problematic.

All these unit grading criteria are supplemented by specific assessment guidance provided in programme/unit handbooks.




2.3.2 Programme-Specific Criteria


Generic descriptors are taken from the QAA (2001) Framework for Higher Education Qualifications. Within the programme, they apply to students who undertake complete programmes of study. Thus, they may not apply in their entirety to students undertaking single units; however, unit grading criteria for all levels are compatible with QAA qualifications and descriptors.


Much of the study at Masters Level will have been at, or informed by, the forefront of an academic or professional discipline. Students will have shown originality in the application of knowledge, and they will understand how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research. They will be able to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, and they will show originality in tackling and solving problems. They will have the qualities needed for employment in circumstances requiring sound judgement, personal responsibility and initiative in complex and unpredictable professional environments (QAA 2001:2).


Students completing all units required to gain a Masters degree from within this programme will have demonstrated:


  • A systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of their area / field of practice.

  • Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques - of research and other forms of enquiry / analysis - are used to create and interpret knowledge in disciplines related to their area / field of practice.

  • A Comprehensive understanding, of a practical and conceptual nature, that enables the student to evaluate critically

  • Currency of research and advanced scholarship in disciplines related to their area / field of practice.

  • research methodologies and/or analytical models / frameworks, develop ‘critiques’ of them (acknowledging positive and negative aspects appropriately) and proposing techniques applicable to their own study of issue(s) within their area / field of practice.

  • An ability to make informed judgements, about conclusions to be drawn from the findings of their own independent study, in relation to their area / field of practice generally and/or their personal practice development.

  • Enhanced communication skills which may include verbal and written skills, across a range of media



NOTE: The Phase 2 project 60 credit unit involves students undertaking an independent research project. In order to ensure students can carry this out to the required depth a higher limit of up to 21,000 words has been allocated to this assignment.



    1. Arrangements for anonymous marking of summative assessments


With the exception of student presentations, all summative assessments within the programme will be anonymously marked. In many cases the first marker will recognise which student the assignment belongs to, for example, in the case of research dissertations where the first marker is the research supervisor. In these cases the internal moderator and the External Examiner will provide the anonymous marking. However, in many other cases anonymous marking will apply across the whole marking and moderation process. Anonymity currently ends after marking has been completed and currently students are named for Examination Board purposes. However, the programme will comply with University procedures on anonymous presentation of candidates at Board of Examiners if and when they are implemented.


Students will be supplied with a personal identification number and the assessment submission process will be set out in the student handbook.

Following graduation, students will be asked to produce a named copy of their complete project for lodging in the university library. Normally students will be required to provide this as a single document on a CD and this will be uploaded to the Faculty dissertation website in PDF.



    1. Arrangements for the quality management of placement learning


Arrangement for the quality management of placement learning is not applicable to this programme. Students will work in placement areas but their learning in relation to this academic programme does not require learning in placement. They are however likely to study at a distance from the university and will be supported within their practice area.



    1. Academic Partnership Activity


Not applicable to this programme.



    1. Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Body Links


Not applicable to this programme.



    1. Flexible and distributed learning (including e-learning)


On the whole, the programme will be offered on-line with supporting face-to-face sessions within the physician’s own clinical area (blended learning). The on-line element is based around a virtual hospital, St Emlyn’s, with problem-based learning and online lectures and tutorials, web links and discussion sites. Face to face lectures and tutorials will be offered where appropriate and therefore all students within the programme will experience blended learning.


St Emlyn’s website and resources will be available to all students and staff using a password system. Access will be available from the student’s home, workplace or from the university and therefore study can take place when convenient for the student. Discussion between groups of students, whether on line or face to face, will be negotiated between students and staff.

Flexibility is inherent in the programme structure. The programme team recognise the difficulties inherent in professional learning and the requirements of practice and mature learners. Students may opt to study a single unit, or a programme of units and the units are designed to ‘stand alone’ or build into a coherent programme.


All units within the programme are subject to the same rigorous quality assurance processes. Particular efforts are made with distance learning students concerning evaluation of their experiences and to ensure that their views are represented at Programme Committees. Summaries of student evaluation and action plans are published online and students are invited to give feedback for the attention of the Programme Committee when their attendance is not possible.


3 ASSESSMENT REGULATIONS


3.1 Statement on MMU Regulations for Taught Postgraduate Programmes of Study

The University Regulations apply to all programmes leading to an MMU award, or credit contributing to an award unless variation is agreed by the Academic Board.


3.2 Programme-specific regulations


3.2.1 Student attendance and absence


There will be no penalty for non-‘attendance’. However, students who do not access the unit learning may struggle to complete the assessment. Therefore, where a student’s ‘attendance’ record (monitored electronically) during the unit indicates that they may not meet the unit requirements, students will be contacted for clarification and, where appropriate, will be offered support.


3.2.2 Approved variation or exemption from MMU Regulations


Not applicable to this programme.

4 PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT AND STUDENT SUPPORT


4.1 Programme Committee


4.1.1 Membership


The Programme Committee will consist of the following members:


        • Programme Leader (Chair)

        • Head of Department of Continuing Professional Studies and Postgraduate Studies (ex officio)

        • Dean of Faculty (ex officio)

        • Unit Leaders

        • Members of full-time and part-time staff teaching on the programme

        • Student representatives elected from both the full-time and part-time modes and from each cohort of the programme

        • Library Representative

        • IT Representative



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