Faculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies




НазваниеFaculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies
страница1/20
Дата13.10.2012
Размер1.16 Mb.
ТипДокументы
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20



FACULTY OF HEALTH, PSYCHOLOGY AND SOCIAL CARE




DEPARTMENT OF CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND POSTGRADUATE STUDIES




MSc EMERGENCY MEDICINE




DEFINITIVE DOCUMENT




HISTORY OF MODIFICATIONS


TYPE OF MODIFICATION

(E.g., ASC, Major or Minor)

DESCRIPTION

APPROVAL

(DATE)

Approval


Definitive Document produced

10 April 2008



CONTENTS

Page

Part One – Programme Specification i



Programme Specification i

Part Two – Programme Regulations



1 Admission Regulations 1


Standard Entry Requirements 1

Admission with Exemption 2

Admission with Specific Credit 2

Accreditation of Prior (Experiential) Learning (AP(E)L) 2

Relationship with University Foundation Year 3


2 Curriculum Design and Organisation 4


Curriculum Design and Overview 4

Relationship to Subject Benchmark Statement(s) 8

Assessment Criteria for Marking Schemes 8

Arrangements for Anonymous Marking of Summative Assessments 11

Arrangements for the Quality Management of Placement Learning 12

Academic Partnership Activity 12

Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Body Links 12

Flexible and Distributed Learning (including e-learning) 12

3 Assessment Regulations 13



Programme-Specific regulations 13


4 Programme Management and Student Support 14


Programme Committee 14

Board of Examiners 15

Programme Leader 18

Other Staff Responsibilities 18

Student Support Strategy 19

Student Evaluation 21

Engagement with Employers 22


Part Three – Curriculum Content 23


Unit Syllabus Proformas 25


Appendices 64


PART ONE – PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION




0

Brief descriptive summary






This Masters level programme offers academic recognition for the professional training undertaken by physicians in emergency care settings.


The programme will be offered on-line with supporting face-to-face sessions within the physician’s own clinical area (blended learning). The on-line element is based around a virtual hospital, St Emlyn’s, with problem-based learning and on-line lectures and tutorial, web links and discussion sites. The programme consists of a number of units that cover clinical emergency medicine (6 units), managerial (3 units) research (2 units) and other (2 units) areas of emergency care from which the student can select a personalised route for academic assessment. The students will be supported within their practice area, which may well be remote from the university.


In Phase 1, each student will undertake 120 credits which will include two clinical units and one research unit, together with an additional 60 credits from any units within the programme.


It is envisaged that most emergency physicians in training will undertake 60 credits from within the programme. It is recognised that the future of emergency medicine requires some diversity of skills and knowledge and in order to facilitate this, and provide links to existing MMU programmes and a programme in development with partners, the programme has been designed with a number of specialist exit awards. This will allow students who wish to focus on education or major incident management, (areas of major importance to the future direction of emergency care), to complete a programme of study with an emergency medicine focus and to exit the programme with an appropriate award.


The final year dissertation (60 credits) will involve students presenting a substantial practitioner project in the field of emergency medicine in an area of their choice. This final piece of work will include a clinical topic review pertinent to the project, a project report and a draft paper for publication derived from the project.




Basic Programme Details




1

Overarching Programme Network/Title and programme specification code(s)





MSc Emergency Medicine

2

Final award(s)/title(s)

(including any PSRB final awards conferred as an automatic result of successful completion of the programme)

MSc Emergency Medicine

MSc Emergency Medicine (with Education)

MSc Emergency Medicine (Major Incident Management)

3

Combined Honours Subject(s)offered through programme specification together with associated final award(s)

(where relevant)

Subject(s): N/A

Final Awards: N/A

4

Interim exit award(s)/title(s)

(including Combined Honours interim exit awards)

PgCert Emergency Medicine

PgCert Emergency Management

PgDip Emergency Medicine

PgDip Emergency Medicine (with Education)

PgDip Emergency Medicine (Major Incident Management)

5

Mode(s) and duration


Full / Part-time 2 to 6 years

6

FHEQ position of final award(s)


Masters (Level 7)


7

Awarding institution

(include PSRBs which confer a joint or additional qualification on successful completion of programme)

Manchester Metropolitan University

8

Teaching institution(s)


Manchester Metropolitan University

9


Relationship with Foundation Year

None


Administrative Details


10

Home Department/ School/ Institute


Department of Continuing Professional Development and Postgraduate Studies

11

Home Faculty


Health, Psychology and Social Care

12

UCAS code(s)






Collaborative Arrangements (where relevant)


13

Approved Collaborative partner(s)

NA

14

Description of type of collaborative provision or academic partnership

NA


Approval Status


15

Date and outcome of most recent MMU review/ approval

NA

16

Next Scheduled Review Date:


Spring 2013

17

PS/1 effective date:

(i.e. date from which the outcome of approval or last review is effective OR the date from which amendments to the programme specification are effective)

September 2008


External References/Relationships


18

QAA Benchmark Statement(s)


There are no QAA subject benchmark statements currently available in this discipline, at Masters level. Students will have achieved benchmarks for undergraduate training in medicine and will build on these during this programme and through their professional training and education. The programme team have taken the College of Emergency Medicine Curriculum for Specialist Training in Emergency Medicine (2006) into consideration when developing this curriculum and, in Appendix 1, have mapped the units against the relevant sections of the curriculum.

19

Date/outcome of last QAA engagement (or equivalent)


N/A

20

PSRB(s) associated with final award of programme

(e.g. those which offer professional status/membership/license to practise as result of successful completion of the final award.

N/A

21

Date and outcome of last PSRB approval(s)


N/A



Programme Information


22

University and Programme Educational Aims



University Educational Aims:


  • To develop flexible approaches to programme delivery and student support which reflect the needs and expectations of our students;

  • To provide a learning experience and support for our learners that encourages and properly sustains a diverse learning community;

  • To provide a learning environment that is free from discrimination and focussed on success for all learners;

  • To enable the development of students’ skills and personal attributes that will enhance employment opportunities on graduation in all programmes;

  • To establish a culture of quality enhancement and progressive innovation in learning, teaching and assessment that is anticipatory, enabling, supportive, rewarding and fully aligned with the institution’s strategic goals;

  • To provide a learning experience that is informed by research, scholarship and reflective practice.


Programme Educational Aims:


  • To increase students’ knowledge and understanding of advanced emergency medicine and management;

  • To develop the student’s capacity to work on the basis of evidence and evaluation as part of their professional commitment to furthering knowledge and improving standards of practice in emergency care;

  • To encourage critical exploration of issues impacting on the student’s practitioner role;

  • To call on the student’s own experience of working in emergency care, as part of a process of gaining critical understanding and insight of their work;

  • To enable the student to challenge assumptions that operate at a local organisational and professional level and which influence practice;

  • To strengthen the student’s capacity to apply methods of enquiry and evaluation to their daily practice and to understand and use research findings as part of their work;

  • To foster the student’s ability to develop and drive professional practice in emergency care on the basis of appropriate evidence.


These aims are seen to facilitate the expectations expressed by the QAA that Masters level students, on completion of a Masters degree, should “typically” be able to:


  • Deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make informed judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences;

  • Demonstrate self direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional or equivalent level;

  • Continue to advance their knowledge and understanding and to develop new skills to a high level


and will have:


  • The qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring:

    • The exercise of initiative and personal responsibility;

    • Decision making in complex and unpredictable situations; and

    • The independent learning ability required for continuing professional development.’

(QAA 2000 p10)





23

Programme Learning Outcomes


MMU Educational Outcomes:


Successful students will be able to develop and demonstrate transferable intellectual skills, in particular their ability to:


  • communicate clearly in speech, writing and other appropriate modes of expression;

  • argue rationally and draw independent conclusions based on a rigorous, analytical and critical approach to data, demonstration and argument;

  • apply what has been learned;

  • demonstrate an awareness of the programme of study in a wider context.


1. Programme Learning Outcomes

Students completing the Masters Programme will have demonstrated:


  • A systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and /or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of emergency care professional practice;

  • A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship which leads to;

    • The ability to plan, implement and critically evaluate a project within their own practice area

    • The ability to apply project findings to practice and evaluate the implications of results for future work

    • Skills in writing for publication

  • Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in emergency care;

  • Conceptual understanding that enables the student:

    • To evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in emergency care; and

    • To evaluate methodologies and develop critiques of them and, where appropriate, to propose new hypotheses.’

(adapted from QAA 2000:10)


Students completing Masters Programmes will have:

  • The qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring:

    • The exercise of initiative and personal responsibility;

    • Decision making in complex and unpredictable situations; and

    • The independent learning ability required for continuing professional development.

(QAA 2000: 10)

2. Combined Honours Learning Outcomes


Not applicable


3. Pass Degree Learning Outcomes


Not applicable





24

Interim Award Learning Outcomes



This programme is designed to have a large amount of flexibility, to enable the student to choose a route through it which is most useful for them at the time of undertaking the study and in preparation for their future careers. Each unit is also available as a ‘stand alone’ unit and students may choose a very flexible path where units are studied individually and do not, in effect, build on each other. All units are at Masters level and generic M and subject outcomes apply in each case.


Students may exit the programme with an award at various points and the intended learning outcomes for which are described here.


The PgCert Emergency Medicine award consists of two clinical and one research unit.

The learning outcomes for a PgCert Emergency Medicine are therefore, characterised by the clinical and research focus. Therefore students completing a PgCert Emergency Medicine will demonstrate:


  • A systematic understanding of clinical knowledge, and a critical awareness of current clinical problems and / or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of emergency care professional practice;

  • An understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship;

  • Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in emergency care;

  • Conceptual understanding that enables the student;

    • To evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in emergency care; and

    • To evaluate methodologies and develop critiques of them.



Learning outcomes for PgCert Emergency Management are characterised by its management focus. Therefore students completing a PgCert Emergency Management will demonstrate:


  • A systematic understanding of current and emerging people management issues in the emergency care setting;

  • A comprehensive understanding of management techniques applicable to their own practice, research or advanced scholarship;

  • Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in emergency care;

  • A systematic understanding of those aspects of law which have an influence and impact on Emergency Department practice and of how aspects of the law affect the delivery of care;

  • Conceptual understanding that enables the student:

    • To evaluate critically current problems constraints and drivers affecting the management of emergency care

    • To evaluate methodologies and develop critiques of them and, where appropriate, to propose new hypotheses.’



PgDip Emergency Medicine including PgDip Emergency Medicine (with Education) and PgDip Emergency Medicine (Major Incident Management) learning outcomes


All students exiting with a postgraduate diploma will have undertaken clinical and research units as well as other units from within or outside the programme as described earlier.


Students completing a PgDip Emergency Medicine, PgDip Emergency Medicine (with Education) and PgDip Emergency Medicine (Major Incident Management) will demonstrate:


  • A systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of emergency care professional practice;

  • A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship;

  • Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in emergency care;

  • Conceptual understanding that enables the student;

    • To evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in emergency care; and

    • To evaluate methodologies and develop critiques of them and, where appropriate, to propose new hypotheses.’


Subject learning outcomes will also be fulfilled by students exiting with a PgDip Emergency Medicine (with Education) or a PgDip Emergency Medicine (Major Incident Management) as assignments will have a particular focus on these areas.





25

Teaching/Learning and Assessment Strategy



Programme Philosophy

The programme aims to validate and acknowledge the professional education of emergency physicians in training and to allow established emergency physicians to validate their continuing professional development. The learning is set in the “real world” of these students, and as such is designed to allow easy transition from learning to practice. The learning has additionally been designed to allow a collaborative and constructivist approach whist acknowledging the realities of work which often dictate a more independent and individual approach for the busy professional.


Teaching, Learning and Assessment

The overall strategy for teaching, learning and assessment within the programme ensures that the student groups are educated in ways that assure academic standards and promote life-long learning and at the same time addresses their needs and, where appropriate, the needs of professional practice. It is particularly important to recognise that all students entering the programme are mature professionals who, at the end of their studies, will wish to, and be expected to, make a difference to practice; the overall strategy is one that will enable students, where appropriate, to make a beneficial impact on practice. The strategy is one that perpetually integrates theory and practice; neither one nor the other taking precedence: students may well ask either ‘how does theory integrate with practice’ or ‘how does practice integrate with theory’?


Each unit will detail the learning and teaching methods and the assessment process(es). This detail will be given to students when they commence the unit (or group of units).


Learning and Teaching

Depending on the mode of learning (distance learning; e-learning; blended learning), students will experience different teaching and learning methods but the overall strategy will be facilitative, stimulating, reflective, interactive, experiential, intellectual and respectful of students’ previous knowledge and experience. The focus will be on challenging and enjoyable learning that can be transferred to future situations in practice and continuing personal and professional development. Students will be encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning and wherever possible will be able to be involved in decisions about the way in which their learning is planned.


General Methods of Learning and Teaching

The methods of learning and teaching focus on developing students’ capabilities in a theory-practice context. Teaching and learning methods will also enable the development of key transferable skills and will be supported by assessment strategies.


The core approach is a socio-constructivist one. Students will take part in facilitated group discussion (either face-to-face or on-line) on practice based cases. These groups will support learning and professional growth and will not impact on assessment, though students may use their group experiences in reflective journals. Experts will be used when appropriate. Additional methods will be utilised that allow students to contextualise key issues with their particular practice, for example small group work and reflection on practice.


IT is utilised both as a method of supporting learning (i.e. the dissemination of web-based material) and as a specific learning method (for example on-line learning and discussion). All units require students to engage in the St Emlyn’s virtual hospital environment, which is on a Moodle platform. The case based approach of this e-learning allows students to consider practice based problems and issues and link with other students and tutors to discuss strategies for management and resolution of these case-related issues.


Assessment Strategies

The assessment strategies, criteria and processes are developed and evaluated on a collaborative basis considering MMU summative assessment policy. They are transparent, fair and consistently applied all students. Moreover, they are responsive to the quality monitoring and evaluation processes.


Assessment, learning and academic development are linked through preparation for assessment, feedback and the student’s personal development plan, though assessment is not intended to dominate the learning process. Assessment contributes to the maintenance of professional standards and has relevance to contemporary professional practice. It enables demonstration that intended learning outcomes have been achieved. A range of assessment methods are used in order to offer students choice; prevent / identify plagiarism; where appropriate, and, where appropriate, includes formative assessment which may contribute to the wordage in recognition of the amount of student effort involved (in which case it will be mandatory and its conditions set out explicitly within the specific unit proforma). Normally a 20-credit unit will be equivalent to 4,500 words.


Assessment Modes

Modes of assessment include essays, examinations, presentations, case studies, formative exercises, portfolios, projects and self and peer assessment which are intrinsically linked to theory and practice.


Assessment Quality Procedures

These will be set within the MMU quality framework, using the processes of moderation and external examination to ensure ongoing quality of process and outcome


Providing Student Feedback and Evaluation on Assessment

Unit leaders will provide written and verbal assessment guidelines and will provide opportunities for students to discuss their ideas for assessment. Feedback on assessed work will identify, in student-friendly language why a particular mark was reached and where necessary, why a pass mark was not achieved


Summative Assessment Strategy

In order to meet the general assessment criteria, the student will demonstrate that they have:


  • interpreted the instructions provided to produce a critical and balanced review of practitioner issues;

  • organised and structured arguments based on their own independent study;

  • used appropriate resources and quotes in supporting arguments, referencing all sources correctly;

  • demonstrated the interaction between academic input and practitioner issues;

  • provided not only an understanding but also an application of course work and private study together with a critical analysis of practitioner experience;

  • provided evidence of a wide range of reading material relevant to practice and used this in the arguments presented;

  • integrated understanding of course work with a critical review of practice, in a manner original to their own professional experience;

  • actively debated issues relating to the issue under discussion, rather than having merely presenting a balanced case for a given position in relation to this issue.


Other assessment criteria are specific to each unit assessment and link to the M level programme outcomes.





26

Programme structures, levels, credits, awards and curriculum map

Including specific progression arrangements for Foundation Degrees


The MSc Emergency Medicine is available to students on either a full or part time basis and consists of two phases of study; successful completion of 60 credits (as detailed below) at Phase 1 allows students to exit with a PgCert, whilst successful completion of 120 credits (as detailed below) will allow students to exit with a PgDip. Students can elect to undertake particular named routes through the programme or undertake a generic programme of study by electing 60 credits of study and focusing their Phase 2 studies on any area of emergency medicine relevant to the professional practice.


Students exiting with PgCert

In order to exit with the generic award of PgCert Emergency Medicine, the student must complete 60 core option credits, which consist of two clinical and one research unit of their choice (the core option requirements). Details of units that students can select are provided in the curriculum map below.


The PgCert Emergency Management has been developed for those senior staff in Emergency Departments who may have completed their professional training but want a postgraduate qualification which reflects their management function. These students will be required to undertake the three 20-credit management units:


  • Human Resource Management in the Emergency Department

  • Legal Aspects of Emergency Medicine

  • Managing the Emergency Department


Students exiting with PgDip

The exit award of PgDip Emergency Medicine will follow the completion of 120 credits to include the 60 Core Option credits (two clinical and one research unit) and 60 other credits from any units within the programme.


Two additional exit awards have been offered for those students who access the programme having undertaken a relevant PgCert elsewhere and want to specialise in emergency medicine. These are:



  1. PgDip Emergency Medicine (with Education)

Students who choose an education route through this programme will bring 60 credits to the programme in the form of a Postgraduate Certificate in Education at level 7. They will complete the core requirements for Phase 1 of this programme and will be able to exit at that point with an award of a PgDip Emergency Medicine (with Education).


  1. PgDip Emergency Medicine (Major Incident Management)

Students who wish to focus on Major Incident Management will bring 60 credits to the programme in the form of a Postgraduate Certificate in Major Incident Management units. They will complete the core requirements for Phase 1 of this programme and be able to exit at that point with an award of PgDip Emergency Medicine (Major Incident Management).


Exit with MSc Emergency Medicine – with or without named route

The final award of MSc Emergency Medicine will result from successful completion of 60 Core Option credits plus 60 Elective credits from Phase 1 plus the 60-credit unit from Phase 2.


To gain the named award MSc Emergency Medicine (with Education), students must come into the programme with a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (60 level 7 credits), complete the 60 core option credits and complete the Phase 2 unit with an assessment focused on education in Emergency Medicine.


To gain the named award MSc Emergency Medicine (Major Incident Management), students must come into the programme with a Postgraduate Certificate in Major Incident Management (60 level 7 credits), complete the 60 core option credits and complete the Phase 2 unit with an assessment focused on the impact of Major Incident Management on Emergency Care.


Curriculum Map


Phase 1

Electives and

Clinical Core Option Units

Acute Medical Emergencies 1

20 Credits

Paediatric Emergencies

20 Credits

Surgical Emergencies

20 Credits

Students must complete 2 of 6 clinical units


Acute Medical Emergencies 2

20 Credits

Psychosocial Emergencies

20 Credits

Trauma Emergencies

20 Credits

Electives and Research Core Option Units

Students must complete 1 of 2 research units


Evidence-based Emergency Practice

20 Credits

Study Design and Execution in Emergency Medicine

20 Credits




Electives and

Management Units Mandatory Core Units for PgCert Emergency Management

Human Resource Management in the Emergency Department

20 Credits

Legal Aspects of Emergency Medicine

20 Credits

Managing the Emergency Department

20 Credits


Electives

Emergency Life Support

40 Credits

Major Incident Management

20 Credits




Phase 2

Phase 2 Project

60 Credits

Mandatory Core Unit







27

Personal Development Planning



Students enrolling on the programme will already have personal development plans organised through their professional context of employment. These students will be encouraged to discuss their aspirations for study within this context.






28

Placement Learning



As doctors, students will experience placement learning but the placement is not a requirement for this programme.





29

Points of Reference



Internal


  • University Mission and Strategic Aims

  • Regulations for the Academic Awards of the University

  • University Regulations for Undergraduate Programmes of Study

  • Academic Regulations and Procedures Handbook

  • Faculty Programme Review Report

  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy

  • Staff research

  • Departmental Professional/Industrial Advisory Committee

  • Staff/Student Liaison Committee



External


  • QAA Framework for HE Qualifications

  • QAA Code of Practice

  • College of Emergency Medicine (2006) Fellowship Curriculum in Emergency Medicine College of Emergency Medicine London

  • Department of Health (2007) A Guide to Postgraduate Speciality Training in the UK – the Gold Guide DH London








This Programme Specification provides a concise summary of the main features of a Programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if s/he take full advantage of the learning opportunities provided. More detailed information on the learning outcomes, curriculum content, teaching/learning, assessment methods for each unit and on the Programme’s relationship to QAA Subject Benchmark Statements may be found in the definitive document and student handbook for the Programme. The accuracy of the information in this document is reviewed periodically by the University and may be subject to verification by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education.




  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20

Похожие:

Faculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies iconFaculty of health, psychology and social care

Faculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies iconCentury Department of Social Work, College of Professional Studies, University of West Florida

Faculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies iconFaculty of Health Sciences: Anaesthesia and Intensive care

Faculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies iconTopic 2: Confidentiality in health and social care

Faculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies iconFaculty of Health Sciences Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Journal Article

Faculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies iconUniversity of the West of England School of Health and Social Care

Faculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies iconDepartment Of Care, Social Sciences and Early Education

Faculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies iconThe Department of Social Studies

Faculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies iconFaculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Centre for Australian Indigenous Research and Studies

Faculty of health, psychology and social care department of continuing professional development and postgraduate studies iconPostgraduate Studies in Sociology Department of Sociology University College Cork

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница