Answer the following questions in writing and submit by end of class today. Finish the two page paper (see# 25) by end of class tomorrow




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Use the POWERPOINT


Answer the following questions in writing and submit by end of class today. Finish the two page paper (see# 25) by end of class tomorrow.

Homework tonight is to work on your ideas and be ready to finish the paper tomorrow.


  1. How do we refer to the format we are studying?

  2. Why should we use this format with every paper we write?

  3. What does cross referencing allow?

  4. What are three benefits of a consistent format such as MLA?

  5. What is credibility? How does the citing of resources help establish the credibility of the writer?

  6. What is plagiarism and how does MLA help you to avoid it? What can happen to the student who engages in plagiarism at the university level?

  7. Where do I find the rules for MLA documentation?

  8. MLA style has two parts. What are they?

  9. What is the work cited page? What is its purpose?

  10. Make a list of observations on the work cited sample provides. The list should have at least ten observations.

  11. What three items are usually part of the work cited?

  12. What kind of sources is cited in this slide?

  13. What kinds of sources are cited on this slide?

  14. What kinds of sources are cited on this slide?

  15. What should you do if you do not know how to cite a source?

  16. When should you use parenthetical notation? What does quoting mean?

  17. Explain in your own words when you should use parenthetical notation?

  18. What will enhance readability in your paper?

  19. Copy an example of parenthetical notation.

  20. When is more information necessary?

  21. What other problems might you find and how do you handle these?

  22. How does the parenthetical notation differ for a long quote over six lines? Give an example.

  23. What do you do if you do not know how to cite a source?

  24. Where can you get help?

  25. Choose an area of personal interest. Cite a book, an online source and a newspaper or magazine article. Write a two page paper using MLA citations and finish with a work cited page. Make sure that you follow the rules you have just studied. The following source page shows you how to prepare a works cited page on your paper. Whatever is left at the end of these two days is our homework. If you need more time on a school computer you will have to come after school. Do not waste the two full blocks I am allowing for this assignment. Assignment is due on January 3, 2006.

Does your work cited page look like the sample in slide 25?


Source: Teacher selected Powerpoint


Grading


Your paper makes sense and has five sources-a long quote, short quote and a paraphrase from at three different types of sources. Your paper uses parenthetical notation. ________/75 points


Rubric points are based on five different entries. Missing entries mean an immediate deduction.



REQUIREMENTS

Completed

Possible Points

Scored Points

  1. The works being cited are in alphabetical order.








8




  1. The bibliographic information in the cited source is written according to a correct format.








40




  1. Each work cited is double spaced.








8




  1. There are double spaces between each work cited.








8





  1. Reverse paragraphing is used to cite the sources; that is, the second and any subsequent lines are indented so that the name in the first line stands out.








8




  1. The page is entitled Works Cited.





1




  1. The page has equal margins all around.





2




TOTAL 75

_______/150


If you do not finish, you must do work on your own time. Late papers will be marked down one letter grade per day.




























MLA LIST OF WORKS CITED

An alphabetized list of works cited, which appears at the end of your research paper, gives publication information for each of the sources you have cited in the paper. For a sample list of works cited, see the MLA-style sample paper. (See also advice on preparing the list of works cited.)

NOTE: Unless your instructor asks for them, omit sources not actually cited in the paper, even if you read them.

The following models illustrate the MLA style for works cited entries, set forth in the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6th ed. (New York: MLA, 2003).

Top of Form

Directory to MLA works cited entries (pick one to see its explanation)


Bottom of Form

General guidelines for listing authors
Alphabetize entries in the list of works cited by authors' last names (if a work has no author, alphabetize it by its title). The author's name is important because citations in the text of the paper refer to it and readers will be looking for it at the beginning of an entry in the alphabetized list.

NAME CITED IN TEXT

According to Matt Sundeen, . . .

BEGINNING OF WORKS CITED ENTRY

Sundeen, Matt.


The following examples show how to begin an entry for a work with (1) a single author, (2) multiple authors, (3) a corporate author, (4) an unknown author, and (5) multiple works by the same author. What comes after this first element of your citation will depend on the kind of source you are citing. (See items 6-56.)

NOTE: For a book, an entry in the works cited list will sometimes begin with an editor (see item 9).

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1. Single author
For a work with one author, begin the entry with the author's last name, followed by a comma; then give the author's first name, followed by a period.

Tannen, Deborah.



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2. Multiple authors
For works with two or three authors, name the authors in the order in which they are listed in the source. Reverse the name of only the first author.

Walker, Janice R., and Todd Taylor.


Wilmut, Ian, Keith Campbell, and Colin Tudge.

For a work with four or more authors, either name all of the authors or name the first author, followed by "et al." (Latin for "and others").

Sloan, Frank A., Emily M. Stout, Kathryn Whetten-Goldstein, and Lan
     Liang.


Sloan, Frank A., et al.



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3. Corporate author
When the author of a print document or Web site is a corporation, a government agency, or some other organization, begin your entry with the name of the group.

First Union.


United States. Bureau of the Census.


American Automobile Association.



NOTE: Make sure that your in-text citation also treats the organization as the author (see MLA in-text citations, item 9).


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4. Unknown author
When the author of a work is unknown, begin with the work's title. Titles of articles and other short works, such as brief documents from Web sites, are put in quotation marks. Titles of books and Web sites are underlined. (For titles of works within Web sites, see items 28 and 29.)

ARTICLE OR OTHER SHORT WORK
"Media Giants."

BOOK OR OTHER LONG WORK
Atlas of the World.



Before concluding that the author of a Web source is unknown, check carefully (see caution). Also remember that an organization may be the author (see item 3).


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5. Two or more works by the same author
If your list of works cited includes two or more works by the same author, use the author's name only for the first entry. For other entries use three hyphens followed by a period. The three hyphens must stand for exactly the same name or names as in the first entry. List the titles in alphabetical order.

Atwood, Margaret. Alias Grace: A Novel. New York: Doubleday, 1996.


---. The Robber Bride. New York: Doubleday, 1993.



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Books
Items 6-19 apply to print books. For online books, see item 29.

6. Basic format for a book

For most books, arrange the information into three units, each followed by a period and one space:

  1. The author's name

  2. The title and subtitle, underlined

  3. The place of publication, the publisher, and the date.



Take the information about the book from its title page and copyright page. Use a short form of the publisher's name; omit terms such as Press, Inc., and Co. except when naming university presses (Harvard UP, for example). If the copyright page lists more than one date, use the most recent one.

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7. Author with an editor
Begin with the author and title, followed by the name of the editor. The abbreviation "Ed." means "Edited by," so it is the same for one or multiple editors.

Kerouac, Jack. Atop an Underwood. Ed. Paul Marion. New York:
     Penguin, 2000.



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8. Author with a translator
Begin with the name of the author. After the title, write "Trans." (for "Translated by") and the name of the translator.

Allende, Isabel. Daughter of Fortune. Trans. Margaret Sayers Peden.
     New York: Harper, 2000.



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9. Editor
An entry for a work with an editor is similar to that for a work with an author except that the name is followed by a comma and the abbreviation "ed." for "editor" (or "eds." for "editors").

Craig, Patricia, ed. The Oxford Book of Travel Stories. Oxford:
     Oxford UP, 1996.



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10. Work in an anthology

Give the elements in this order:

  1. The name of the author of the selection (not the name of the editor of the anthology)

  2. The title of the selection

  3. The title of the anthology

  4. The name of the editor, preceded by "Ed." for "Edited by"

  5. Publication information

  6. The pages on which the selection appears



If you wish, you may cross-reference two or more works from the same anthology. Provide an entry for the anthology (see item 9). Then in separate entries list the author and title of each selection, followed by the last name of the editor of the anthology and the page numbers on which the selection appears.

Desai, Anita. "Scholar and Gypsy." Craig 251-73.


Malouf, David. "The Kyogle Line." Craig 390-96.


Alphabetize the entry for the anthology under the name of its editor (Craig); alphabetize the entries for the selections under the names of the authors (Desai, Malouf).


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11. Edition other than the first
If you are citing an edition other than the first, include the number of the edition after the title (or after the names of any translators or editors that appear after the title): 2nd ed., 3rd ed., and so on.

Auletta, Ken. The Underclass. 2nd ed. Woodstock, NY: Overlook,
     2000.



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12. Multivolume work
Include the total number of volumes before the city and publisher, using the abbreviation "vols."

Conway, Jill Ker, ed. Written by Herself. 2 vols. New York: Random,
     1996.


If your paper cites only one of the volumes, give the volume number before the city and publisher and give the total number of volumes after the date.

Conway, Jill Ker, ed. Written by Herself. Vol. 2. New York: Random,
     1996. 2 vols.



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13. Encyclopedia or dictionary entry
When an encyclopedia or a dictionary is well known, simply list the author of the entry (if there is one), the title of the entry, the title of the reference work, the edition number (if any), and the date of the edition.

Posner, Rebecca. "Romance Languages." The New Encyclopaedia
     Britannica: Macropaedia. 15th ed. 1987.


"Sonata." The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language.
     4th ed. 2000.


Volume and page numbers are not necessary because the entries in the source are arranged alphabetically and therefore are easy to locate.

If a reference work is not well known, provide full publication information as well.

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14. Sacred text
Give the title of the edition of the sacred text (taken from the title page), underlined; the editor's name (if any); and publication information.

Holy Bible: New Living Translation. Wheaton: Tyndale, 1996.



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15. Foreword, introduction, preface, or afterword
Begin with the author of the foreword or other book part, followed by the name of that part. Then give the title of the book; the author of the book, preceded by the word "By"; and the editor of the book (if any). After the publication information, give the page numbers for the part of the book being cited.

Morris, Jan. Introduction. Letters from the Field, 1925-1975. By
     Margaret Mead. New York: Perennial-Harper, 2001. xix-xxiii.


If the book part being cited has a title, include it immediately after the author's name.

Ozick, Cynthia. "Portrait of the Essay as a Warm Body." Introduction.
     The Best American Essays 1998. Ed. Ozick. Boston: Houghton,
     1998. xv-xxi.



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16. Book with a title within its title
If the book contains a title normally underlined, neither underline the internal title nor place it in quotation marks.

Vanderham, Paul. James Joyce and Censorship: The Trials of Ulysses.
      New York: New York UP, 1997.

If the title within the title is normally put in quotation marks, retain the quotation marks and underline the entire title.

Faulkner, Dewey R., ed. Twentieth Century Interpretations of "The
     Pardoner's Tale." Englewood Cliffs: Prentice, 1973.



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17. Book in a series
Before the publication information, cite the series name as it appears on the title page, followed by the series number, if any.

Malena, Anne. The Dynamics of Identity in Francophone Caribbean
     Narrative. Francophone Cultures and Lits. Ser. 24. New
     York: Lang, 1998.



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18. Republished book
After the title of the book, cite the original publication date, followed by the current publication information. If the republished book contains new material, such as an introduction or afterword, include information about the new material after the original date.

Hughes, Langston. Black Misery. 1969. Afterword Robert O'Meally.
     New York: Oxford UP, 2000.



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19. Publisher's imprint
If a book was published by an imprint (a division) of a publishing company, link the name of the imprint and the name of the publisher with a hyphen, putting the imprint first.

Truan, Barry. Acoustic Communication. Westport: Ablex-Greenwood, 2000.



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Articles in periodicals

This section shows how to prepare works cited entries for articles in magazines, scholarly journals, and newspapers. In addition to consulting the models in this section, you will at times need to turn to other models as well:

  • More than one author: see item 2

  • Corporate author: see item 3

  • Unknown author: see item 4

  • Online article: see item 32

  • Article from a subscription service: see item 31


NOTE: For articles appearing on consecutive pages, provide the range of pages, such as 121-29 or 298-310. When an article does not appear on consecutive pages, give the number of the first page followed by a plus sign: 32+.

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20. Article in a magazine

List the following elements, in order, separated by periods:

  1. The author's name

  2. The title of the article, in quotation marks

  3. The title of the magazine, underlined

  4. The date and the page numbers, separated by a colon

Abbreviate the names of the months except May, June, and July. If the magazine is issued monthly, give just the month and year.



If the magazine is issued weekly, give the exact date.

Lord, Lewis. "There's Something about Mary Todd." US News and
     World Report 19 Feb. 2001: 53.



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21. Article in a journal paginated by volume
Many scholarly journals continue page numbers throughout the year instead of beginning each issue with page 1; at the end of the year, the issues are collected in a volume. To find an article, readers need only the volume number, the year, and the page numbers.

Ryan, Katy. "Revolutionary Suicide in Toni Morrison's Fiction."
     African American Review 34 (2000): 389-412.



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22. Article in a journal paginated by issue
If each issue of the journal begins with page 1, you need to indicate the number of the issue. After the volume number, put a period and the issue number.

Wood, Michael. "Broken Dates: Fiction and the Century." Kenyon Review
     22.3 (2000): 50-64.



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23. Article in a daily newspaper
Begin with the name of the author, if there is one, followed by the title of the article. Next give the name of the newspaper, the date, and the page number (including the section letter). Use a plus sign (+) after the page number if the article does not appear on consecutive pages.

Murphy, Sean P. "Decisions on Status of Tribes Draw Fire." Boston
     Globe 27 Mar. 2001: A2.


If the section is marked with a number rather than a letter, handle the entry as follows:

Wilford, John Noble. "In a Golden Age of Discovery, Faraway Worlds
     Beckon." New York Times 9 Feb. 1997, late ed., sec. 1: 1+.


When an edition of the newspaper is specified on the masthead, name the edition after the date and before the page reference (eastern ed., late ed., natl. ed., and so on), as in the example just given.

If the city of publication is not obvious, include it in brackets after the name of the newspaper: City Paper [Washington, DC].

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24. Editorial in a newspaper
Cite an editorial as you would an unsigned article, adding the word "Editorial" after the title.

"All Wet." Editorial. Boston Globe 12 Feb. 2001: 14.



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25. Letter to the editor
Name the writer, followed by the word "Letter" and the publication information for the periodical in which the letter appears.

Shrewsbury, Toni. Letter. Atlanta Journal-Constitution 17 Feb. 2001:
     A13.



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26. Book or film review
Name the reviewer and the title of the review, if any, followed by the words "Rev. of" and the title and author or director of the work reviewed. Add the publication information for the publication in which the review appears.

Gleick, Elizabeth. "The Burdens of Genius." Rev. of The Last Samurai,
     by Helen DeWitt. Time 4 Dec. 2000: 171.

Denby, David. "On the Battlefield." Rev. of The Hurricane, dir. Norman
     Jewison. New Yorker 10 Jan. 2000: 90-92.



Electronic sources

MLA's guidelines for documenting electronic sources can be found in the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6th ed. (New York: MLA, 2003). For more help with citing electronic sources in MLA style, see the list of frequently asked questions in the section "MLA Style" on MLA's Web site, http://www.mla.org.

NOTE: When a Web address in a works cited entry must be divided at the end of a line, MLA recommends that you break it after a slash. Do not insert a hyphen.

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27. An entire Web site
Give as many of the following elements as apply and as are available:

  1. The name of the author or corporate author (if known)

  2. The title of the site, underlined

  3. The names of any editors

  4. The date of publication or last update

  5. The name of any sponsoring organization

  6. The date of access

  7. The URL in angle brackets

In the following example, items 3 and 5 do not apply.

WITH AUTHOR



WITH CORPORATE (GROUP) AUTHOR

United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Values and Functions
     of Wetlands. 25 May 1999. 24 Mar. 2001
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