1. Manuscript: Aberdeen University Library 154




Название1. Manuscript: Aberdeen University Library 154
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193



1. Manuscript: Aberdeen University Library 154.

2. Index number: # 163

3. File name: aberdeent.tag

4. Date: C13b2–C14a1

5. Text(s): volume of sermons in Latin containing on the final folio (fol. 368v) a couplet and three quatrains in English as follows:

(1) yore was a londe wrathe and Hate an honde

(2) quatrain on the death of a miser beg. Wane e niig his deyde me buriicth him cove.

(3) a four-line lament from the grave beg. Waylaway nu his me vo nou rotye ihc hunder molde.

(4) quatrain beg. Hwo so him bi-ohte yn-ward-liche an ho[f]te.

6. Grid Ref: 378 159

7. Localisation: Hinton, Somerset

8. Evidence and comments: literary anchor text. Ex libris inscription on fol. 212 (Pauuus liber de sermonibus. xx. primus in H. Hentone, ordinis Cartusie) indicates the book belonged to the Carthusian priory of Hinton near Bath in Somerset. Cf. Ker Med Lib. 101.

9. Corpus sample: represents all the text in English in this hand

10. Number of tagged words: 117 (number of tagged forms 140)

11. Number of place names: 0

12. Number of personal names: 0

13. Total number of words: 117 (other elements 0)

14. Script: semi-cursive Anglicana

15. Other relevant information about the tagged text: none

16. Status: manuscript punctuation done; tagging notes and textual notes up to date

17. Bibliographical information: edited with parallel versions Hargreaves (1969).

(1) NewIMEV 4273.5.

(2) IMEV 4038.

(3) IMEV 3902.

(4) IMEV 4129.

18. Cross references: for other versions of the same see Hargreaves (1969).


1. Manuscript: Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 8

2. Index number: # 264

3. File name: cccc8t.tag

4. Date: C13b2–C14a1 (ca. 1300, OBMEV)

5. Text(s): English on a flyleaf (p. 547): fragment of a song (part of the final line) and a complete song with musical notation beg. Worldes blisce haue god day. The flyleaf is four pages of a C13 music book with music on a five-line stave. The pages are numbered 558, which contains music with Latin words; 547 containing the English texts; 548 which has a French song; and 557 which contains fragments of French and Latin. See James (1912).

6. Grid Ref: 419 226

7. Localisation: E Gloucs

8. Evidence and comments: the text language has been fitted.

9. Corpus sample: represents all the text in English in this hand

10. Number of tagged words: 127 (number of tagged forms 146)

11. Number of place names: 0

12. Number of personal names: 3

13. Total number of words: 130 (other elements 0)

14. Script: Textura semiquadrata.

15. Other relevant information about the tagged text: none.

16. Status: manuscript punctuation done; tagging notes and textual notes up to date.

17. Bibliographical information: CB Reg i 206. Wells Suppl 1, p. 975 (VII.20a). IMEV 4221 and IMEV Suppl *1500.5. CB13 58. OBMEV 40. D&H, p. 194.

18. Cross references: lines 9–16 of the above lyric are to be found also in Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates’ 18.7.21, John of Grimestone’s Commonplace Book, fol. 124r. For a full catalogue of the English verses in the latter manuscript see Wilson (1973); the extract from Worldes blisce is printed on p. 51, no. 200. For Advocates’ 18.7.21, see also LALME 1, p. 88 and CB14 pp. xvi–xix. Note that a ten-line lyric in Worcester Cathedral, Chapter Library Q 46, item (2), fol. 288r has the same first line as this song but continues quite differently. This version concerns Christ’s passion, the Worcester text deals with the vanity of worldly possessions.


1. Manuscript: Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 145.

2. Index number: # 286

3. File name: corp145selt.tag

4. Date: C14a1 (ca1310–20, Görlach (1974: 78 and n. 28)

5. Text(s): the work of Hand A (the main hand) viz fols. 1r–210v of the South English Legendary. Two slightly later hands provide the rest of the text: Hand B (C14a2): 210v–213r; Hand C (C14a2–b1): 214r–218 (end). These are too late for inclusion in LAEME.

6. Grid Ref: 429 195

7. Localisation: NW Berks

8. Evidence and comments: the text language has been fitted. It corresponds to LALME LP 6810, and the LALME placing is accepted here. Ex libris inscription in a hand of early C15 indicates that the manuscript was owned by that date by Southwick Priory, Hants. Ker Med Lib, p. 181. (Note that LALME has Hand B as LP 5560 in Hants; Hand C is not placed.)

9. Corpus sample: tagged sample is fols. 63r–77r line 8; 82r line 11–92v line 18; 122r line 35–133r line 8 — Inventio Crucis, SS Quiriac, Brandan; Barnabas, Theophilus, Alban, John the Baptist; James the Great, Christopher, Martha, Oswald the King. Sections were chosen to give some overlap with the five saints’ legends tagged from Oxford, Bodleian Library Laud Misc 108, entry 1, Hand A.

10. Number of tagged words: 29738 (number of tagged forms 36080)

11. Number of place names: 63

12. Number of personal names: 436

13. Total number of words: 30237 (other elements 3)

14. Script: Anglicana.

15. Other relevant information about the tagged text: the punctuation is very simple. Apart from paragraph markers - noted as {para}, which appear at the beginning of lines at irregular intervals, marking new sections or sometimes changes of speaker, there is only the punctus. This occurs regularly to mark the half-line and very irregularly — apparently more or less randomly — at the end of the line. The punctus is usually placed somewhere between the baseline and half-way up the height of an average ascender, but as there seems to be no difference in its function according to its height, I mark it as an ordinary punctus {.} not as a raised punctus {^.} It is not always clear from microfilm whether end of line punctus are intended or not — some are quite faint and may be pen resting marks. I have recorded these if they seem clear to me and if they are in the expected position not too far from the final letter of the final word in the line. The decorative ‘tail’ on final E also sometimes ends with an extra press of the pen, which could be intended as a punctus, but I have only recorded it as such if the point is separate from the tail and/or done with a separate movement. Each line begins with a littera notabilior, these are marked as capitals with * and are normally formed as capitals, except those litterae whose majuscule and minuscule figurae are the same. New sections begin with a large decorated capital — noted after the word in the tagged text — followed by a smaller capital letter. On the microfilm it looks as if the letter immediately following the midline punctus is rubricated. I do not mark these with * as they are not majuscule in shape, but the rubrication is a useful guide to where missing or misplaced punctus should be situated — I have noted any exceptions to the general rule.

In words with final EO, the O is habitually erased, I assume by a corrector rather than by the main scribe. This assumption is based on the fact that other corrections are made in a hand and ink different from the main scribe. I use [] to indicate where it happens as is the practice in d’Evelyn and Mill (1956, 1959). Midword the corrector has not usually tried to alter EO. I take it therefore that EO was the spelling intended by the original scribe; the brackets indicate merely that the letter is not now wholly visible. This contrasts with the correction of EO to E in the Ormulum where Orm was apparently responsible both for the original spelling and for the removal of the O. In the Ormulum therefore, I transcribe E

16. Status: manuscript punctuation done; tagging notes and textual notes up to date.

17. Bibliographical information: CB Reg i 206–210. Wells V.19 (p. 294) and cf. Wells V.44, 47, 50, 51, 52, 54, 59, 67 (p. 322), 78 (p. 331), 80. Severs 2 V.1 and cf. Severs 2, pp. 561–635. For individual entries in IMEV
see Hamer (1995) and NewIMEV, p. 290. Görlach (1974: 77–79). Edited: D’Evelyn and Mill (1956,1959).

18. Cross references: cf. London, British Library, Egerton 2891 (imperfect) and the fragment in Leicester Museum 18 D 59 which, according to Görlach (1974), are very similar to this manuscript textually and orthographically. (Neither of these versions has yet been transcribed and tagged for LAEME.) For other early manuscripts containing parts of the South English Legendary see Kilkenny Corporation Archives, Liber Primus Kilkenniensis (Prologue only); London, British Library, Harley 2277; Nottingham University Library Mi Lm 7/1 (fragments); Oxford, Bodleian Library, Ashmole 43; Oxford, Bodleian Library, Laud Misc. 108, entry 1, item (3).


1. Manuscript: Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 402.

2. Index number: # 272

3. File name: corpart.tag

4. Date: C13b?. Note that Malcolm Parkes (pers. comm. 12/9/02) dated the text palaeographically as s. xiii4/4, even possibly as late as the 1290s. He has more recently revised this dating to ‘probably 1270s or early 1280s (as reported in Millett (2005: xi). Such a late dating (even revised back as it is) presents difficulties linguistically in that the exceptionally strong similarity of the language of this manuscript and that of Oxford, Bodleian Library, Bodley 34, dated by Parkes ‘late 1230s or early 1240s’ is then very hard to account for (see further below on AB language). Parkes suggests that the Corpus hand may be ‘an archaising hand’, but the linguistic evidence strongly suggests an earlier date. On archaising hands in general see Parkes (1997). Dobson (1976: 16, 121 n. 2) puts it at ca 1230 (and cf, Dobson (1966)). Ker in Tolkien (1962: xv) says ‘first half of the thirteenth century’ and ‘after rather than before 1225’.

5. Text(s): fols. 1r–117: Ancrene Wisse ‘MS A’, all in one hand. This is a uniquely surviving revised version of Ancrene Riwle (called Ancrene Wisse), incorporating many of what are assumed to be authorial revisions, especially since the extensive corrections and additions in the ‘MS C’ (London, British Library, Cotton Cleopatra C vi, entry 2) all bring the earlier version preserved there closer to this version. Dobson (1972: xciii-cxl, esp. xcvi) considers the reviser of MS C (Scribe B of that manuscript) to be the original author of the text. (Cf. Millett 2005: xiv, lvi–lviii.)

6. Grid Ref: 352 275

7. Localisation: Ludlow, S Salop

8. Evidence and comments: the text language has been given a tentative localisation in Ludlow on the basis of the connection with John Purcel and Walter of Ludlow noted below, and because the linguistic evidence suggests that the language belongs somewhere in the area of N Herefords/S Salop. The manuscript was given, certainly within a generation or two after its production, to Wigmore Abbey, Herefords (Ker Med Lib, p. 198). It was donated by John Purcel at the instigation of Walter of Ludlow, who was then the precentor at Wigmore. On the lower margin of fol. 1r appears in a late thirteenth or early fourteenth century hand ‘Liber ecclesiae sancti Jacobi de Wygemor: que
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