Twentieth-Century American Politics and Diplomacy




НазваниеTwentieth-Century American Politics and Diplomacy
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Twentieth-Century American Politics and Diplomacy




Series 1


The Walter Lippmann

Papers


Part 2: Selected Correspondence, 1931-1974



Sections 1&2


Primary Source Microfilm


an imprint of the Gale Group

The Walter Lippmann Papers




Part 2, Section 1: Selected Correspondence, 1931-1974

(Reels 40-84)


Part 2, Section 2: Selected Correspondence, 1931-1974

(Reels 85-126)


From the holdings of the


Manuscript and Archives Division of Sterling Memorial Library at Yale University,

New Haven, Connecticut


Primary Source Microfilm


an imprint of the Gale Group


Primary Source Microfilm

an imprint of the Gale Group


12 Lunar Drive, Woodbridge, CT 06525

Tel: (800) 444 0799 and (203) 397 2600

Fax: (203) 397 3893


P.O. Box 45, Reading, England

Tel (+ 44) 1734 583247

Fax: (+ 44) 1734 394334


ISBN: 1-57803-280-6


All rights reserved, including those to

reproduce this book or any parts

thereof in any form


Printed and bound in the

United States of America


2003


CONTENTS


Collection Overview……………………………………………………….……………. v

Introduction to the Collection………………………………………………………….. viii

Chronology……………………………………………………………………… x

Degrees……………………………………………………………………….. xviii

Honors and Awards……………………………………………………………………. xix

Editorial Notes………………………………………………………………………… xxi

Reel Index: Part 2, Section 1……….…………………………………………………. xxii

Reel Index: Part 2, Section 2……….…………………………………………………xxiii

Acknowledgments……………………………………………………………………. xxiv

Walter Lippmann Papers: Part 2, Section 1………………………………………...…… 1

Walter Lippmann Papers, Part 2, Section 2……………………………………………110

Collection Overview


For almost seventy-five years of this century Walter Lippmann knew and corresponded with a great many men and women in most parts of the world who were deeply involved in and helped shape the course of events. His papers, starting in 1906 with his undergraduate years at Harvard and ending with his death in 1974 at the age of eighty-five, constitute an important contribution to the history of our own time. They give a picture of the public life of this century from the angle of vision of an author, editor, journalist and political philosopher. In the political drama, Walter Lippmann was back stage, on stage, and among the critics in the stalls.


The Walter Lippmann Papers (MS. Group No. 326), consisting of 115 linear feet of correspondence and other types of material, are divided into the following ten series:


Series No.




I

Correspondence, 1906 – 1930

II

Requests To Speak, Write Or Reprint, 1906 - 1930

III

Correspondence, 1931-1974

IV

Requests To Speak, Write Or Reprint, 1931 - 1974

V

Public Opinion Mail, 1931 – 1974

VI

Manuscripts and/or Typescripts

VII

Diaries And Engagement Books

VIII

Honors

IX

Photographs, Portraits And Sketches

X

Films, Recordings And Tapes


Because of the volume of the papers, the first four series are divided into the periods 1906 - 1930 and 1931 - 1974. The year 1931 was considered a logical series break because Walter Lippmann’s career as an editor ended with the demise of the New York World in February and his career as a columnist for the New York Herald Tribune began in September. A description of the content and arrangement of each of the ten series immediately precedes the folder listing for the series in this register.


Researchers should be aware that there are two Walter Lippmann manuscript groups at the Yale Library, with separate registers. The group described above, and in this register, is known as the Walter Lippmann Papers, Manuscript Group Number 326. The second is known as the Robert O. Anthony Collection of Walter Lippmann, Manuscript Group 766. The distinction between the two is that Group 326 consists of Lippmann’s personal papers and manuscripts of his writings, while Group 766 is, in general, a collection of his published work. Between the two collections, probably no other journalist and few public figures will have had a career so carefully and completely documented for the historian of the future.


It is worth noting that only materials from Series I, III, V, VII, and portions of a separate group recently acquired by the Manuscripts and Archives Division of Sterling Memorial Library at Yale University have been included in the microform edition of The Walter Lippmann Papers.


Accession

The Walter Lippmann Papers (MS Group No. 326, Manuscripts and Archives) became the property of the Yale University Library by deed of gift in July, 1944. Inasmuch as the 1940s were probably the busiest years of his career as author and columnist, Lippmann needed his files for reference purposes, and it was not until 1963, some twenty years later, that the papers were actually removed from his home in Washington, D.C., and deposited in the Yale Library.


As early as 1941 Walter Lippmann had given to Yale some 300 numbers of serials and pamphlets for the Yale War Collection through his long-time friend, Wilmarth S. Lewis, Yale ’18, who was active in the affairs of the Yale Library. In 1942 Lippmann wrote his lawyer, Albert Stickney, that he had been asked by the Library of Congress and also by the Yale University Library to give them all his papers, and that this action would involve a change in his will when he knew more clearly just exactly what he wanted to do. Two yeas later, in a letter to Lewis dated July 3, 1944, Lippmann wrote: “I took the invitation from Yale as a favor to me, and a very great distinction, not as something I was doing for Yale. It never occurred to me to consult Harvard, where I had been an overseer, about my papers any more than I might have asked them if they were going to give me an honorary degree.” Lewis replied on July 5th: “Needless to say, I am very happy that you have given Yale your papers. The Yale Library is one of the chief things in my life, and it is a joy for me that it is to have this great collection. The scholars of the future will now have to come to Yale to study our time.” On the same date, Charles Seymour, President of Yale University, wrote Lippmann: “May I express again and more emphatically our deep gratitude for the gift of your papers. Their value in the Yale collection will be obviously enormous,” and in a letter the next day Lewis reminded Lippmann: “I first spoke to you about your papers two years ago.”


The decision in 1944 also involved a collection of published works by and about Walter Lippmann which had been assembled as a hobby, beginning in 1931, by Robert Olney Anthony, Amherst ’26, a telephone executive for the Bell System in New York City. His collection included magazine articles, a complete file of Lippmann’s “Today and Tomorrow” column (1931-1967) which he indexed, other newspaper articles, bulletins and pamphlets concerning Lippmann, newspaper clippings, and books by, about, or prominently mentioning him. Both for the protection of the collection and to increase its availability to scholars, it was a propitious time to transfer his collection to the Yale Library. Lippmann agreed that both collections should be kept together, and in 1944 when Lippmann decided to give his papers to Yale, Anthony also offered his associated collection. Two years later when Anthony was transferred from New York to the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company in Providence, Rhode Island, on December 2, 1946, his collection was transported to the Yale Library. His collection is listed as the Robert O. Anthony Collection of Walter Lippmann (MS Group No. 766, Manuscripts and Archives). On December 3, 1946, Anthony was named curator of the newly-formed collection by the Yale Corporation.


During 1945 and early in 1946 Lippmann sent to Yale several items, e.g., manuscripts of some of his books, and the announcement of his gift appeared in the press in June, 1946. Also in 1946 at the time of the Anthony collection move, the library truck picked up Lippmann’s bound volumes of the editorial pages of the New York World for the period 19254 through February, 1931, which were in his office at the New York Herald Tribune in New York City.


It was not until February, 1963, when he was almost seventy-four, that Lippmann felt he could give up the bulk of his papers, consisting at that time of forty-two large files of personal correspondence and two boxes of original manuscripts. They were shipped to Providence, Rhode Island, for processing by Anthony and eventual shipment to Yale. In 1964 another shipment arrived in Providence, consisting of diaries and engagement books through 1959.


In 1964, Richard H. Rovere began his work in both collections as the authorized biographer of Walter Lippmann, with the assistance of Gary Clarkson. Four years later, finding himself uneasy in the role of biographer without assurance of complete independence as to content, Rovere, in 1968, found a successor in Ronald Steel, a journalist who had been a foreign service officer. Steel’s biography is in preparation for expected publication in the fall of 1978.


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