The syllabi given here are indicative Unit Guides give definitive information for the current academic year




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Postgraduate Scheme Guide 2001/02 Part 3. Unit Syllabi

Part 3 Unit Syllabi


The syllabi given here are indicative - Unit Guides give definitive information for the current academic year.

Advanced Computer Architectures


Pre-requisites Knowledge of computer system components and operating principles (CPU/memory/IO peripherals) including some experience of assembly language programming.


Co-ordinator Dr. R D Kaye.


Aims

To enable computer system integrators, managers and programmers to evaluate a range of system architectures with particular relevance to maximising system performance.


Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this unit, students will have gained the knowledge to -


• Understand the structure and operation of high-performance and high-reliability systems and their components.

• Understand and exploit the relationship between software (algorithm) design and the behaviour of the underlying hardware.


In addition, students will be able to evaluate and measure the effects of changes to system architecture and components upon selected aspects of system performance.

Examples will be drawn from current microprocessor and high-performance system design.


Syllabus Content

• Performance measures - predictive and empirical. Technological and architectural approaches to high performance.


• CPU : High-performance and novel architectures - pipelining, vector, array, superscalar, VLIW architectures. Co-processors. Non-VonNeumann architectures.


• Memory : Techniques for high-speed main memory. Memory hierarchies. Virtual memory.


• I/O : Techniques for improving latency and throughput.


• Parallel processing : Shared and distributed memory. Interconnection networks. Characteristics of concurrent software.


• Fault-tolerant systems : Fail-safe and fault-tolerant techniques - computer system components and peripheral devices.


Teaching and Learning Methods

The lectures provide an overview of the topics to be studied each week. A major part of the work will be carried out during the non-contact hours.

The lectures are supplemented by tutorials, tutorial exercises and assignments.

Typical assignments may include -

• Cache memory simulation - effects of cache parameters upon effective memory cycle time.

• Measurement of system performance using benchmark programs.

• Analysis and simulation of parallel processing systems.


Assessment Assignments (2x15%) 30%

One 2 hrs examination 70%


Indicative Book List


Core reading: Computer Organisation & Architecture, 5thEdn. William Stallings. Prentice Hall, 2000.

Background reading: Computer Organisation & Design : The Hardware/Software Interface. Patterson DA, Hennessy JL. Morgan Kaufmann 1994.

Computer Architecture : Design and Performance. Wilkinson B. Prentice Hall 1991.

High-performance Computer Architecture. Stone HS. Addison Wesley 1993.


Advanced Communication Systems


Pre-requisites Data Communication Theory

Data Communications & Networks

Information Theory & Encoding


Co-ordinator Dr A Pervez


Aims

To study in-depth the broad field of data and computer communications, including networks, protocols, and performance criteria and evaluation.

Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this unit, students will have gained the knowledge to -


• understand the key topics of data and computer communications

• apply methods, principles, design approaches, international standards, and de facto standards.

Syllabus Content

Network structures - To classify networks by means of transmission method - leased line, switched, packet networks; area covered - LAN, WAN, MAN; bandwidth used and type of signal - narrow band, broad band, base band, carrier borne.

Network level protocols & performance - To gain an understanding of protocols of data networks including OSI and vendor architectures and standards; Medium Access Control, including TDMA, polling, token passing, random access, together with performance modelling.

Data link controls & performance - To study routing and flow control techniques including aspects of shortest-path routing, sliding window control and queueing aspects.

Packet Switching - To study network layer protocols and internetworking, including X.25, SNA, TCP/IP, bridges, gateways, and routers.

High level protocols - To study the higher level protocols - transport, session presentation and application layers; together with examples of applications such as X400, MAP, TOP, EPA, VT, SNMP, FTP, FTAM etc.

Advanced digital transmission systems - ISDN facilities and functions,

B-ISDN, ATM and new switching techniques and services, SDH.

Mobile Radio Communications - Digital Cellular systems for mobile and personal cordless communications.

Satellite Communications -Principles of satellite communications, frequency reuse techniques, broad and narrow beam, polarisation techniques. FDMA and TDMA. Link budget.


Teaching and Learning Methods

Teaching is by 24 hours lectures and 12 hours of tutorials and discussion sessions. Lectures will cover all the main aspects of the subject matter in the unit. Printed material, which will include some lecture material, tutorial examples, and solutions, will be provided.


Assessment One 2 hours written examination (80%), plus an assignment (20%).


Indicative Book List


Core reading Halsall F, ‘Data Communications, Computer Networks and Open Systems’, Addison Wesley, (3rd Edition) 1992.

Stalling W, ‘Data and Computer Communications’, (4th Ed) MacMillan 1994.


Background reading Thorpe and Ross, 'X.25 made easy', Prentice Hall International.

Scott, Currie, and Horwood, 'LANs Explained', Wiley.

Maral & Bousquet, ‘Satellite Communications Systems (2nd Ed)', Wiley 1993

Jagoda & Villepin, ‘ Molbile Communications’, Wiley 1993


Computer Systems


Pre-requisites None


Co-ordinator Dr. Goran Bezanov


Aims

To provide all students with a sound knowledge of computer system architectures, components and operating principles. This will enable them to operate effectively in any IT environment as well as providing a knowledge base for the specialist options.


Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this unit, students will have gained sound understanding of the structure and operating principles of -


• Computer systems hardware, including peripheral interfaces and devices

• Operating systems, including their role in resource management and system operation

• Concurrent systems, their use in operating systems and applications software


Syllabus Content


• Computer systems hardware : Concept of stored-program machine; CPU, controller and data paths; Instruction and data formats; Interrupts;
Memory, main, cache, virtual;
Input/output, parallel, serial, common data formats and interface standards; I/O programming, polled, interrupt-driven, DMA;
Peripheral devices, handshaking, common forms of peripheral device.


• Operating systems : Concept of processes, multi-tasking, scheduling;
Memory management, paging, protection;
I/O management, device drivers, buffering, scheduling;
Data management, file systems, file allocation and access;
User interface; System calls, APIs.


• Concurrency : Concurrent processes; Sharing of data and hardware resources;
Mutual exclusion; Deadlock; Communication between asynchronous processes; Language support.


Teaching and Learning Methods

The lecture material is nominally divided into two streams - hardware and operating systems/concurrency - which are taught by the two lecturers concerned.

The lectures provide a context for, and an overview of the topics to be studied each week.

The main part of the work will be carried out by students during the non-contact hours.

The lectures are supplemented by tutorials, tutorial exercises and mini-tests.


Assessment

Mini-tests 20%

One 2 hrs Examination 80%


Indicative Book List


Core Reading:


Computer Organisation & Design : The Hardware/Software Interface. Patterson DA, Hennessy JL. Morgan Kaufmann 1994.

Deitel HM. Operating Systems. Addison-Wesley 1989.

Tanenbaum AS. Modern Operating Systems. Prentice-Hall 1992.


Background reading :


Richie C. Operating Systems : Incorporating UNIX and MSDOS. DP Publications 1992.

How Computers Work. White R. Ziff-Davies Press. 1993.

Tanenbaum AS. Operating Systems : Design and Implementation. Prentice-Hall 1987.

Silberschatz A, Galvin PB. Operating System Concepts. Addison Wesley 1994.

Stallings W. Operating Systems. Maxwell Macmillan 1992.

Switzer R. Operating Systems : A practical approach. Prentice-Hall 1993.

Milenkovic M. Operating Systems : Concepts and Design. McGraw Hill 1992.


Data Communication Theory


Pre-requisites None


Co-ordinator Dr. A Pervez


Aims

To serve as an introduction to analytical methods currently in widespread use incommunications.

To give students a practically based understanding of the theoretical description of the different types of signals, and the techniques used to process them.

To provide an understanding of communication systems that transmit and detect information in digital forms.

To teach the principles of digital communication systems in terms of system design, impairments, performance analysis and evaluation.


Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this unit, students will have gained the knowledge to -


• Know the formats of common digital baseband and encoded signals.


• Understand the conception and use of the Fourier transform of continuous and discrete functions, and the notion of power spectral density.


• Understand the conception and uses of convolution, correlation, and power spectral density.


• Understand the conception and uses of the sampling theorem, leading to the generation of PCM.


• Understand the basic theories of digital baseband, encoded, and digital modulated communication systems engineering. Understand the causes for system impairment and evaluate the resultant system degradation using appropriate performance criterion.


Syllabus Content

Communication signals - Deterministic and non-deterministic signals. Mathematical and probabilistic representations of deterministic and non-deterministic signals respectively for the continuous and discrete cases. Digital baseband, encoded, and digital bandpass signals. The concept of random signals.


Fourier Analysis - Fourier series especially the complex series, signal symmetry.

Fourier transform. Applications of Fourier transform.


Correlation - Cross correlation and Auto correlation processes and their connection to power spectral densities.


Electrical Noise - Noise as an example of a random signal. Thermal noise as the fundamental electrical noise source. Its probabilistic model expressed as a Gaussian distributed random variable with zero mean. Its autocorrelation function and the connection to the WHITE power spectral density. Idea of band limited noise.

Digital Data - The sampling theorem, the processes of quantization, and encoding. Generation of pulse code modulation (PCM). Quantization noise and its evaluation. TDM, Hierarchical multiplexing of PCM signals to generate a high speed data channel.

Baseband digital transmission - System quality and performance evaluations, transmissin channel characteristics, channel bandwidth limitations, intersymbol interference (ISI), the influence of noise and channel characteristics on system performance, equalization and ISI minimisation techniques, optimum detection and SNR maximisation techniques, evaluation of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the probability of error.


Line encoding and synchronization - Line codes, the timing information, clock recovery and synchronization schemes, jitter.

Digital modulation techniques - Amplitude shift key (ASK), frequency shift key (FSK), phase shift key (PSK), PRK, DPSK, QPSK. Generation and detection methods. System performance. Error probability evaluations


Teaching and Learning Methods

Teaching is by 18 hours lectures, 18 hours tutorials and laboratory work. Lectures will cover all the main aspects of the subject matter in the unit. Printed material, which will include some lecture material, tutorial examples, and solutions, will be provided. The laboratory exercises are designed to supplement the lectures

(and vice versa). Lectures and laboratory experiments are treated as a unified body of work.


Assessment

There will be one 2 hours written examination (80%), and laboratory assessed work (20%). Each student is expected to carry out 3 experiments and maintain a log book on all the experimental work. In addition to the log book, each student will be required to write a detailed formal report on one of the experiments.


Indicative Book List


Core reading:

Stremler F G, 'Introduction to Communication Systems', Addison Wesley, 1992.

Lynn P A, ‘An Introduction to the Analysis and Processing of Signals’, Macmillan, 1982.


Background Reading:

Goodyear C C, ’Signals & Information’, Butterworths, 1971

Peebles P Z, 'Communication system Principles', Addison Wesley, 1981

Stroud K A, 'Engineering Mathematics', MacMillan, 1986

Proakis J G, 'Digital Communications', McGraw-Hill, 1987.

Sklar B, 'Digital Communications Fundamentals & Applications', Prentice-Hall International, 1988.

Ziemer R E and Peterson R L, ' Introduction to Digital Communication', Macmillan, 1992.


Databases Principles


Pre-requisites Software Development.


Co-ordinator Dr Gabor Nyerges


Aims

To provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of databases and their application to engineering.


Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this unit, students will have gained the knowledge to -


• distinguish between the various data models for data bases

• normalise data representations

• determine the most appropriate data model for engineering applications

• design relational databases

• use a dbms to query existing databases

• use a dbms to implement databases

• discuss security and legal aspects aspects

• use standards

• appreciate the particular problems associated with temporal databases

• appreciate the particular problems associated with distributed databases

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