Syllabus for cs 100 – Introduction to Computers and Information Systems




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Syllabus for CS 100 – Introduction to Computers and Information Systems


Objectives

This is a first course in computers and information systems. It provides basic information and makes student familiar with the terminology necessary through their life in order to be able to use and

interact with Information Systems. Students will be able to use and interact with Computers and organizational Information Technology infrastructure after taking this course.

 


Textbook

Computers Are Your FUTURE 2006 ISBN: 0-13-148801-5

Bill Daley, Pearson - Prentice Hall http://www.prenhall.com/

 


Grading

Office + Web works : 45 Pts.

Midterm : 25 Pts.

Final : 30 Pts.

 


Course Outline

Lecture 1:  Computers, Web and You. An Introduction.

Practice 1: Open Office 2. How to Load? 

Lecture 2:  The Internet and World Wide Web.

Practice 2: Your first web page by Open Office Writer. (index.htm)

Lecture 3:  Wired and wireless communication.

Practice 3: A spreadsheet work by Calc.

Lecture 4:  Systems Software.

Practice 4: HTML, hyperlink. Show your work over Internet. 

Lecture 5:  Application Software.

Practice 5: Advanced electronic table calculations with Open Office

Calc. 

Lecture 6:  Inside the System Unit

Practice 6: Show your work over Internet..

Lecture 7:  Input - Output and Storage

Practice 7: An advanced writer work. 

MIDTERM

Lecture 8:  Networks.

Practice 8: Open Office Calc exercises more.

Lecture 9:  Privacy and security.

Practice 9: Spreadsheet graphics and OLE

Lecture 10:  Programming Languages.

Practice 10: Show your work over Internet..

Lecture 11:  Databases and Information Systems.

Practice 11: Open Office Impress. Presentation.

Lecture 12:  System analysis and design cycle..

Practice 12: Open Office Impress. Presentation.

Lecture 13:  Enterprise Computing.

Practice 13: Polishing your web site.

FINAL



Syllabus for CS105 – Discrete Structures for Computer Science


Objectives:
Offers an intensive introduction to discrete mathematics as it is used in computer science. Topics include functions, relations, sets, propositional and predicate logic, simple circuit logic, proof techniques, elementary combinatorics, and discrete probability.

Course Outline:

  • Fundamental structures: Functions (surjections, injections, inverses, composition); relations (reflexivity, symmetry, transitivity, equivalence relations); sets (Venn diagrams, complements, Cartesian products, power sets); pigeonhole principle; cardinality and countability

  • Basic logic: Propositional logic; logical connectives; truth tables; normal forms (conjunctive and disjunctive); validity; predicate logic; limitations of predicate logic; universal and existential quantification; modus ponens and modus tollens

  • Digital logic: Logic gates, flip-flops, counters; circuit minimization

  • Proof techniques: Notions of implication, converse, inverse, contrapositive, negation, and contradiction; the structure of formal proofs; direct proofs; proof by counterexample; proof by contraposition; proof by contradiction; mathematical induction; strong induction; recursive mathematical definitions; well orderings

  • Basics of counting: Counting arguments; pigeonhole principle; permutations and combinations; recurrence relations

  • Discrete probability: Finite probability spaces; conditional probability, independence, Bayes' rule; random events; random integer variables; mathematical expectation








Textbook:

Discrete Algorithmic Mathematics (third Edition)

by Stephen B. Maurer & Anthony Ralsot,

Addison Wesley, 2004


SYLLABUS

CHEM 100     Chemistry




Instructor:

Prof. Dr. Tamerkan Ozgen

Office:




Office Hours:




e-Mail:

tamerkano@yahoo.com

Phone:




Class Hours:

08:30-12:20



Objectives:

The goal of this course is to give the basic knowledge of chemistry to engineering students. The subjects covered will be Matter and Measurement; Atoms, Molecules and Ions; Stoichiometry: Chemical Calculations; Chemical Reactions in Aqueous Solutions; Gases; Thermochemistry; Atomic Structure; Electron Configurations, Atomic Properties, and the Periodic Table and Chemical Bonds. After each subject recitation for an hour will be carried for problem solving related to the covered subject.



Course Outline:

Week

Chap.

Topic

1

1

Matter and Measurement, recitation

2

1

Atoms, Molecules, and ions, recitation

3

3

Stoichiometry: Chemical Calculations

4

3

Stoichiometry: Chemical Calculations, recitation

5

4

Chemical Reactions in Aqueous Solutions, recitation

I MID TERM EXAM (weekend)

6

5

Gases, recitation

7

5

Gases

8

6

Thermochemistry

9

7

Atomic Structure

10

7

Atomic Structure, recitation

II MID TERM EXAM (weekend)

11

8

Electron Configurations, Atomic Properties, and the Periodic Table

12

8

Electron Configurations, Atomic Properties, and the Periodic Table, recitation

13

9

Chemical Bonds

14

9

Chemical Bonds

15




Final Review , FINAL EXAM (weekend)



Textbook:

General Chemistry, Hill-Petrucci-McCreary-Perry 4th Ed. Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2005, ISBN 0-13-127180-6

References:

General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications, Petrucci-Harwood-Herring-Madura 9th Ed. Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2007, ISBN 0-13-198825-5





Articles:

Will be handed out in class as needed.

Animations:

Will be played in class during lectures

Evaluation:

Students will receive a final letter grade according to the scale shown below, formulated with the percentages in the below table. Performance shown in attandance and participation make up an important part of instructor\'s final opinion.

Evaluation

Percent

Midterm I

20

Midterm II

20

Final

40

Attendance

10

Participation

10

LETTER GRADE multipliers and ranges are shown below:


Score

Semester Grade

Mult.

90-100

AA

4.0

85-89

BA

3.5

80-84

BB

3.0

75-79

CB

2.5

70-74

CC

2.0

65-69

DC

1.5

60-64

DD

1.0

50-59

FD

0.5

49 ve aşağısı

FF

0.0



Attendence:

Attendance is required at all times. Students are expected to come to class fully prepared to discuss textbook readings and course assignments. Some percentage of your final grade will be based on your attendance and class participation.

Announcements:

Announcements will be given in class and posted to the course web site. Students should regularly check the web site for new and updated announcements.







Course ID

SE 315

Course Name

Software Project Management

Semester

Fall 2008

Instructor

Assist. Prof. Dr. M. Suleyman Unluturk

E-Mail

suleyman.unluturk@ieu.edu.tr

Class Times



Office Hours



Course Objectives

Students will be introduced the basics of software project management. Four basic building blocks of software project management will be taught and students will choose and use methods in each area that work best for their class projects. Furthermore, in labs, C# will be taught.

COURSE OUTLINE

Week# Chapters Topic

1 1 Manage Your People

2 2 Implement Your Process

3 3 Leverage Your Tools

4 3 Leverage Your Tools

5 4 Utilize Your Measurements

6 4 Utilize Your Measurements

7 5 Form Your Vision

8 5 Form Your Vision

9 Midterm

10 6 Organize Your Resources

11 6 Organize Your Resources

12 7 Sketch Your Schedule

13 7 Sketch Your Schedule

14 8 Write Your Plan

15 8 Write Your Plan

Text book

Software Project Management A Real-World Guide to Success Joel Henry ISBN: 0-321-22342-X Addison Wesley

Reference book



Evaluation

Evaluation Percent
Midterm: %20 Labs: %10 Project: %40 Final: %30

Attendance

Attendance in class is required at all times. Students are expected to be fully prepared to discuss textbook readings and course assignments. "Full preparation" implies that you have read -- and thought about -- the materials ahead of class. You are expected to present your views and analyses relative to lecture and discussion topics.
Ten percent of your final grade will be based on your attendance and constructive participation in class discussions.




SE 305 – Software Specification and Design

Instructor:

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Yaşar Güneri ŞAHİN

Office:

408

Office Hours:




e-Mail:

yasar.sahin@ieu.edu.tr

Phone:

488-8173

Class Hours:




Objectives:

Study of the principals, practices, and techniques used to gather system requirements and document them in a requirements specification. Includes techniques for requirement discovery such as user interviews and prototyping. Introduces approaches for organizing and expressing software requirements in a requirements specification. More, study of requirements with increasing emphasis on converting requirements into a software system design. Presents alternate approaches to design representation including diagrammatic and formal approaches, techniques for evaluating specifications, specification and design tools, and use of specifications to develop system-level tests.

Course Outline:

Week

Chap.

Topic

1

1

Introduction - The Requirements Engineering Process

2

6

Software requirements - Elicitation

3

7

Requirements engineering processes

4

8

System models – system requirements

5

9

Critical system specification

6

10

Formal specification

7

-

Documentation

8




MIDTERM EXAM

9

11

Architectural design

10

13

Application architectures

11

14

Object oriented design - UML diagrams

12

15

Real time system design - UML application

13

16

User interface design - UML application

14

-

Documentation

15




FINAL EXAM



Textbook:

Software Engineering 8, Ian Sommerville, 8th Ed. Addison Wesley, 2007, ISBN 0-321-31379-8

References:

Software Engineering, Roger S. Pressman, Darrel Ince, McGraw-Hill Publishing Co.; 5Rev Ed edition (2007), ISBN: 978-0077096779

Software Specification and Design: An Engineering Approach, by Ph.D., John C. Munson, AUERBACH; 1 edition (2005), ISBN: 978-0849319921

An Introduction to Requirements Engineering, Ian K Bray, Addison-Wesley (2002), ISBN: 978-0201767926

Web References:



Articles:

Will be handed out in class as needed.

Assignments, Homework:

There will be regular homework assignments for each topic covered. Homework assignments are to be completed individually unless specified otherwise. Homework will consist of problem sets as well as small programming assignments. It is important to spend the time to experiment with the various program elements, so start your homework promptly. All assignment submissions must be typed. All homework must be handwritten unless specified otherwise. Late (expressed in policies) assignments WILL NOT be graded.

Evaluation:

Students will receive a final letter grade according to the scale shown below, formulated with the percentages in the below table. Performance shown in homework, attendance and participation make up an important part of instructor's final opinion.

Evaluation

Percent

Midterm

20

Final

30

Project

30

Homework

10

Participation

10

LETTER GRADE multipliers and ranges are shown below:


Score

Semester Grade

Multiplier

90-100

AA

4.0

85-89

BA

3.5

80-84

BB

3.0

75-79

CB

2.5

70-74

CC

2.0

65-69

DC

1.5

60-64

DD

1.0

50-59

FD

0.5

49–0

FF

0.0



Attendance:

Attendance is required at all times. Students are expected to come to class fully prepared to discuss textbook readings and course assignments. Some percentage of your final grade will be based on your attendance and class participation.

Announcements:

Announcements will be given in class and posted to the course web site. Students should regularly check the web site for new and updated announcements.

Course policies:

During each lecture, students will be responsible for taking notes (scribe notes). Each student will be responsible for scribing one lecture. You are expected to supplement your scribe notes with additional material from other sources, such as test books, journal papers, or the Web.

All homework assignments and projects must be turned in at the beginning of class on their respective due date.

Late assignments will be accepted with a 25% penalty per day. Assignments that are submitted more than two days past their deadline will not be accepted and not graded.

Cheating will not be tolerated. Anyone found guilty of cheating on a test or assignment will be awarded an FF grade for the course. Discussions of problems and assignment with your classmates is welcome and encouraged, however, sharing of solutions is not. If you need help, you should ask the TA or the instructor.

There will be NO "make-up" Exams. In case of verifiable emergencies, arrangements must be made with the instructor.

There will be NO early midterm or final exams.







CA330: Mathematics for Computer Games


INSTRUCTOR: Asst.Prof.Dr. Diaa Gadelmavla

Office: Room: 409

Office Hours: Monday 09:30 – 11:30, Wednesday 09:30 – 11:30

Email: diaa.gadelmavla@ieu.edu.tr

Phone: (232) 4888 293

Class Hours: Fri. 08:30 – 11:30

Class Room: K202


COURSE DESCRIPTION:


The course is for anyone interested in the mathematics side of game development. It is intended to present the essential mathematics and physics required for games programming.

Lectures will consist of theories and techniques presented with programs being written and run (in groups and individually) in order to demonstrate the introduced material.

Some background of calculus, geometry, linear algebra are strongly recommended.


COURSE CONTENTS:



  • Orientation and Introduction

  • Points and Lines: Properties of lines

  • Geometry Basics: Distance between points, Parabolas, Circles and Spheres

  • Trignometry Basics: Degree vs. Radians, Trigonometric Functions, Trigonometric Identities

  • Vector Operations: Vector vs. Scalar, Polar coordinates vs. Cartesian coordinates, Vector Operations.

  • Matrix Operations: Matrix Addition and Subraction, Scalar Multiplications, Matrix Multiplications, Transpose.

  • Transformations: Introduction, Translation, Scaling, Rotation, Concatenation.

  • Unit Conversion: İntroduction, The matrix system, Converting Units between Systems, Computer Conversions

  • Motion in one Dimension: Introduction, Speed and Velocity, Accelation, Equation of Motion, Visualization Experience.

  • Motion in Two and Three Dimensions: Introduction, Projectiles, Visualization Experience

  • Newton’s Laws: Forces, Energy, Momentum and Collisions

  • Rorational Motion: Introduction, Circular Motion, Rotational Dynamics



TEXTBOOK:


Fundamentals of Math and Physics for Game Programmers, Wendy Stahler, Prentice Hall, 2006, ISBN: 0-13-168742-5


COURSE POLICY:

Attendance is required at all times. Students are expected to come to the class fully prepared to discuss textbook readings and course assignments. A percentage of your final grade will be based on your attendance and class activities. The final letter grade will be given according to the following scale:

Home Work: 10%

Attendence: 5%

Midterm Examination: 30%

Projects: 20%

Final Examination: 35%


CE360: Wireless Communications


INSTRUCTOR: Asst.Prof.Dr. Diaa Gadelmavla

Office: Room: 409

Office Hours: Monday 09:30 – 11:30, Wednesday 09:30 – 11:30

Email: diaa.gadelmavla@ieu.edu.tr

Phone: (232) 4888 293

Class Hours: Fri. 15:30 – 18:30

Class Room: K202


COURSE DESCRIPTION:


This course will cover basic topics in wireless communications for voice, data, and multimedia. It starts with a brief overview of current wireless systems and standards. We then characterize the wireless channel, including path loss for different environments, random log-normal shadowing due to signal attenuation, and the flat and frequency-selective properties of multipath fading. Next we examine the fundamental capacity limits of wireless channels and the characteristics of the capacity-achieving transmission strategies. The course concludes with a brief overview of wireless networks, including multiple and random access techniques, WLANs, cellular system design, and ad-hoc network design. Applications for these systems, including the evolution of cell phones


COURSE OBJECTIVES:

The objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the basics of wireless networking, standards, components, site planning, installation and configuration.


COURSE CONTENTS:



  • History of wireless communication, and future trends

  • Wireless Generations and Standards

  • Cellular Concept and Cellular System Fundamentals

  • Trunking Cell Splitting and Sectoring

  • Mobile Radio signal propagation, path loss and channel models

    • Large Scale Path Loss

    • Small Scale Path Loss - Rayleigh and Rician Fading

  • Analog Modulation Schemes for Wireless Communication - AM/FM

  • Digital Modulation Techniques for Wireless Communication

  • Multiplexing and Multiple Access techniques

    • TDMA

    •   FDMA

    • ALOHA - Packet Radio

    • Spread Spectrum-CDMA        

    • Frequency Hopped Spread Spectrum

  • Random Access Protocols

  • Wireless Networking

  • Wireless Standards

  • Antennas

  • WLAN Technology and Bluetooth

  • Introduction to Wireless WANs

    • GSM Networks

    • Satellite Communications



TEXTBOOK:

Wireless Communications & Networks, 2/E
William Stallings - Publisher: Prentice Hall – ISBN-10: 0131918354


COURSE POLICY:

Attendance is required at all times. Students are expected to come to the class fully prepared to discuss textbook readings and course assignments. A percentage of your final grade will be based on your attendance and class activities. The final letter grade will be given according to the following scale:

Midterm examination: 30%

Projects: 20%

Homeworks: 10%

Attendance: 5%

Final Examination: 35%

ISE211 INDUSTRIAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS

I-DATABASES AND ANALYSIS

FALL 2008


SYLLABUS


Instructor: Dr. Canan Eren ATAY cananatay@hotmail.com


TEXTBOOK

T. Boucher, A. Yalcin, Design of Industrial Information Systems, Elsevier, 2006.


COURSE OUTLINE Topics to be covered in the course


1- Introduction

Some key Application Areas of an Industrial Information Systems

Information Systems and Decision Support Systems

Production System Classifications and Information Requirements

2- The Relational Database Model

3 - The Relational Database Model

4- Data Modeling

5- Data Modeling

6- Structured Analysis and Functional Architecture Design

7- Informational Architecture and Logical Database Design

8- MIDTERM

9- Design of a User Interface

10- Design of a User Interface

11- Executing an Information System Design Project: A Case Study

12- E-business and Web-Enabled Databases

13- Unified Modeling Language

14- Workflow Management Systems


GRADING

Midterm 20%

Final 40%

Term Project 40%

Total 100%


Izmir University of Economics

Faculty of Computer Sciences

ISE 317 SIMULATION


Instructor: Prof. Semra Tunalı

Phone Number: 3881047/25

E-mail: semra.tunali@deu.edu.tr

Home Page: http://people.deu.edu.tr/semra.tunali

Office Hours: Thursday 13.30pm-14.30pm

TEXTBOOK


Banks, J., Carson II, J. S., Nelson, L. B., and Nicol M. D., Discrete-Event System Simulation, Prentice Hall, 2005.


REFERENCES

  1. Kelton, W.D., Sadowski, R. P. and Sadowski, D.A., Simulation With ARENA, McGraw-Hill, Inc., 2007.

  2. Pegden, D.C., Shannon, E.R. and Sadowski P.R., Introduction to Simulation Using SIMAN, McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1995.


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