Norwegian Network for the Support of the Indigenous Peoples of the Russian Arctic (nnsipra) Сеть Норвежских Организаций в Поддержку Коренных Народов Российского Севера




НазваниеNorwegian Network for the Support of the Indigenous Peoples of the Russian Arctic (nnsipra) Сеть Норвежских Организаций в Поддержку Коренных Народов Российского Севера
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ï NNSIPRA BULLETIN ï

Norwegian Network for the Support of the Indigenous Peoples of the Russian Arctic (NNSIPRA)

Сеть Норвежских Организаций в Поддержку Коренных Народов Российского Севера


No. 3, November 1999 - English Language Edition





Secretariat: Norsk Polarinstitutt, Polarmiljøsenteret, N-9296 Tromsø E-mail: dallmann@npolar.no

Norwegian Polar Institute, Polar Environmental Centre, Phone: +47 - 77 75 05 00

N-9296 Tromsø, Norway Fax: +47 - 77 75 05 01

Coordinator / Editor: Winfried K. Dallmann, Tromsø

Assistant Coordinator: Galina Diachkova (Дьячкова Галина), Moscow

Assistant Editor: Helle V. Goldman, Tromsø


NNSIPRA Bulletin is an information publication of the Norwegian Network for the Support of the Indigenous Peoples of the Russian Arctic. The Bulletin is issued twice a year. Additional issues are produced as new information warrants it. The Bulletin is edited in English and Russian and distributed to all registered network participants, as well as relevant state agencies and funding institutions. Distribution is free. All written contributions are appreciated.


NNSIPRA is a communication network linking Russian Indigenous Peoples' Organisations (IPOs) with Norwegian and other international organisations alarmed about the future of the indigenous peoples of the Russian North. NNSIPRA's main goal is to spread information, to mediate contacts, to assist in project co-ordination and application for funding, and to ascertain through the IPOs that related Norwegian projects take sufficient care of indigenous peoples’ concerns.





CONTENTS OF THIS EDITION:


Letter from the Secretariat 3

The immense need for aid and support 3

Winfried K. Dallmann (Norwegian Polar Institute) and Tove S. Petersen (Arctic Council IPS)

Arctic Leaders Summit III: 5

Circumpolar leaders reach out to Russian aboriginals 5

Jane George (reprint from Nunatsiaq News)

Declaration of the Arctic Leaders Summit III 5

The Saami/Nordic programme "Capacity building for Russia's indigenous peoples …" 7

Lars Kullerud (UNEP/GRID-Arendal)

International Public Fund for Support to Social and Economic Developm. of the Northern Indig. Peoples 8

Stanislav I. Dorzhinkevich (Int. Public Fund)

The indigenous people of the Nenets region and the exploration for oil and gas 9

Asbjørn Sæbøe (Norsk Hydro)

Conflicts in cultural traditions and habitat use in an Evenk society in Northern Transbaikal 10

Ole Grøn (NINA-NIKU) and others

Calls for aid from the Russian North 11

Appeals from representatives of Northern indigenous peoples

Indigenous ethnic groups of the North, Siberia and the Far East of the Russian Federation 15

Part I: The northern zone: Kola to Kamchatka

Winfried K. Dallmann (Norwegian Polar Institute) and Galina Diachkova (Inst. of Ethnology and Anthropology)

Notes 32

Meetings 34

Contacts and addresses 35



Letter from the Secretariat



During the past half a year or so since the prece­ding issue of NNSIPRA Bulletin we have expe­rien­ced a steadily growing interest, both among wor­ried people in the northern areas of the western world and – in particular – among the indigenous communities in the Russian North. The circu­lation of the bulletin now excee­ds 150 co­pies in English and Russian, each.


Emphasizing contributions about and from Russia

This issue includes a variety of articles, but we have tried to concentrate on two main topics. While the two previous issues particularly contained infor­mation about activities of Western players on the scene of Russian indigenous peoples, we are now presenting information about and from the Russian North. A chapter intro­ducing some of the individual indigenous groups is meant to provide some basic information about the ethno­geography, lifestyles and problems faced by these people. It is mainly addressed to Western orga­nisations and actual or potential donors in need of basic data. But it also may serve people in Russia to learn more about each other.

The other topic stressed here comes under the heading Calls for aid from the Russian North. These are short appeals from representatives of indigenous com­mu­nities de­scri­bing their situation. They are worried about their future which they know well lies in their own hands, but they need help. Representatives of humanitarian organisa­tions and potential donors should read these contributions carefully. Though they are brief and sometimes written without much detail, they indi­cate well what sort of help is needed. The authors can be con­tacted for detailed information. Where there are difficulties of communi­cation, the NNSIPRA Secreta­riat is willing to assist!

From NNSIPRA to ANSIPRA

The Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North, Siberia and the Far East (RAIPON) is present­ly realising its own internal newsletter, financially suppor­ted by the Saami/Nordic support programme (see article by L. Kullerud in this issue). NNSIPRA intends to coope­rate closely with this new perio­dical and will try to constitute the international link of the RAIPON Newsletter. Procedures and partitioning of responsibilities will be discussed in the nearest future. When this is realised, NNSIPRA will change its name to ANSIPRA (Arctic Network for the Support of the Indigenous Peoples of the Russian Arctic).

Though the majority of our present contacts remains situated in Russia and Norway, we hope that cooperation with the RAIPON Newsletter will broaden interest in the other Arctic countries.

Early next year, NNSIPRA or ANSIPRA will in­tro­duce its own homepage on the Internet and thus be availa­ble to a much larger public; distribution costs simul­tane­ously will be redu­ced.


Contact us

Winfried Dallmann - e-mail dallmann@npolar.no

phone: (+47)-77750648/500 (Norwegian, English)

fax: (+47)-77750501

Galina Diachkova - e-mail galina@sever.iea.ras.ru

phone: (+7-095)-938 5719/1871 (Russian, English)

Helle Goldman - e-mail goldman@npolar.no

phone: (+47)-77750618/500 (English)

fax: (+47)-77750501



The immense need for aid and support


Thoughts on relations between funding/implementing agencies and indigenous peoples' organisations and representatives in Russia


WINFRIED K. DALLMANN, Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø

TOVE S. PETERSEN, Arctic Council Indigenous Peoples' Secreatariat, Copenhagen


Since the start of perestroika, global society has increasingly gained access to detailed and up-to-date information from the Russian North. We learned that indigenous societies were facing enormous problems with respect to environmental degradation, dismant­ling of traditional heritage and ethnic identity, and deterioration of social conditions and health. During recent years, a new political indigenous consciousness has developed. In a country with a very weak civil society we have witnessed that the indigenous peoples have organised themselves politically and developed ideas of cultural revival and self-determi­nation. However, despite the growing political freedom, the overall situation was - and still is - becoming increasingly des­perate. This applies to socio-econo­mic aspects such as the unstable and decreasing food and goods supplies, sky-rocketing unemployment rates, degrada­tion of the natural resource base, as well as a cata­strophic health situation.

In order to mitigate these disastrous trends, several Arctic countries like Canada, Denmark-Greenland and Norway – and certainly also Russia herself - have developed support program­mes with various targets and sources of funding. These pioneering and praise­worthy initiatives do, as far as we can judge, aim at fundamentally important targets in areas related to networking, distribution of information, capacity and institution building, environmental restoration and con­servation, health care, business development, etc.

Despite the generous contributions and laudable efforts on the part of the various projects, we have to admit that international efforts are still very limited and do not meet the scope and volume of needs among Russian indigenous people. The Russian North consists of vast areas spanning nine time-zones, with hundreds of indigenous communities, lying far from each other and from urban centres. Poorly, if at all, connected by modern transportation lines, they often lack even basic tools for communication such as operative phone lines.

In light of the immense need for assistance, it does not make sense when representatives of international assistance and funding agencies or programmes express their concern about possibly overlapping or competing measures. We do not share these concerns; there is much more to be done on every single issue than any one donor or country is willing or able to cover completely. We also believe that indigenous organisations have an interest in avoiding dependency on a single donor. Donors should avoid attempting to monopolise cooperations with indigenous represent­atives, and should recognise that indigenous groups have a legitimate interest in diversifying their donor base. In practice, this means that no one should criticise the fact that indigenous representatives seek funds for similar purposes from various sources.

We support the idea of some sort of a coordinating forum that can promote professional coping tools for dealing with the rapidly proliferating needs and the measures initiated to address them. In our mind there should not be any doubt that such a forum could best be initiated and implemented by the Russian Asso­cia­tion of Indigenous Peoples of the North, Si­be­ria and the Far East of the Russian Federation (RAIPON), which is the legitimate representative of the indige­nous peoples of Russia. The Association encompasses 29 chapters of indigenous organisations across the entire Rus­sia. Enjoying the status of a permanent participant of the Arctic Council on behalf of the indigenous peo­ples of Russia, it is currently seeking a consultative status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations.

Since the start of the ICC-Canadian and, later, the Danish-Greenlandic initiatives, only a few years ago, RAIPON has undergone a notable transformation. Its capacity to forge international and regional links, to coordinate activities, to raise important issues at va­rious political levels and forums, and to engage in con­­structive dialogue with other sectors of Russian society has grown enormously. Apart from the human resources of RAIPON, the financial basis provided by international and western donors has been crucial for these achievements. But there is much to be done. To link the regional organisations - and not to forget the hundreds of indigenous communities - all across the Russian North together by communication, to build capacity at regional and local levels, including the building of a legal and economic infrastructure that will ensure the survival of indigenous peoples, are all enor­mous tasks that have hardly been started. RAIPON's increased capacity is - along with western money - a very important prerequisite to achieve this goal.

In this context, it might be advantageous if indivi­duals working at RAIPON were not paid by money from individual projects, so that donors would not expect those persons solely to work with "their" pro­jects. The complexity of problems and of coordinating work needed today demands more flexible solutions where RAIPON plays a more central role in making the appropriate allocation of human and financial resources. This is exactly what RAIPON has gained the capacity to do. Everybody, here in particular the western/international donor and project agents who have contributed to what has been achieved should be proud of this and build further on these achievements.




Arctic Leaders Summit III

Moscow, 16 September 1999


Circumpolar leaders reach out to Russian aboriginals


Delegates at the Arctic leaders' Summit in Moscow heard that Russia's aboriginal peoples are living in squalor and misery.


JANE GEORGE

Reprint from Nunatsiaq News (Iqaluit, Canada) October 1, 1999


MONTREAL. — Shocking testimony from Russia's northern peoples about their dreadful living conditions dominated the recent Arctic Lea­ders summit two weeks ago in Moscow.

"We wanted to give them the floor," said Sheila Watt-Cloutier, Canadian president of the Inuit Circumpolar Conference.

The Arctic Leader's Summit brought together the leaders of the circumpolar world's aboriginal peoples — Inuit, Sami, Aleuts and Russia's northern peoples.

Delegates offered silent support as they listened to the sad stories of a region that's been left on its own to survive or die.

Watt-Cloutier said that stories told at the summit brought home the "sad reality of the state of health and poverty" in Russia's North.

"The non-indigenous people are leaving Sibe­ria and taking their resources and techno­logy with them," Watt-Cloutier said.

According to a recent report of the Interna­tional Working Group on Indigenous Affairs, the situation in Russia's North is increasingly bleak.

With no nationwide legislation to protect the rights of native people, there is little official protection for the livelihood or resources of 200,000 northern indigenous people in Russia.

Fewer and fewer of them are able to pursue traditional activities. Reindeer herds have de­crea­sed by over 900,000 since 1990, and biolo­gists now say that the breeding nucleus of the herd has been destroyed.

At the same time, unemployment among Russia's northern peoples has risen to between 45 and 100 per cent.

And the state of health of this destitute popu­lation is deteriorating. The rate of tuberculosis is three to four times higher among northern indigenous peoples than in the rest of Russia. Their rate of alcoholism is 12 to 14 times higher, although there are no controls on the sale of alcohol.

Last year, ICC came under fire for its delivery of food and other essential items to Chutkotka, because the gesture was seen as overly expensive.

But ICC now plans to set up a more modest, Inuit-to-Inuit aid campaign, to deliver essential hunting equipment to Chutkotka before winter. A former resident of that region, who now lives in Ottawa, will spend three months coordinating the drive.

Watt-Cloutier said the ICC also plans to pursue the second phase of its capacity-building project in Russia, to strengthen the role and importance of groups that work with aboriginal peoples.

ICC has has submitted its new project pro­posal to the Canadian International Development Agency. Its goal would be to set up mini-econo­mic projects and a training centre.

In 1995, ICC received $1.9 million from the federal government to oversee a project to help Russia create new aboriginal and northern policies.


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