Mayor’s foreword 5Executive summary 7Introduction 17 1 Maintaining London’s position 33as a world city for culture




Скачать 370.18 Kb.
НазваниеMayor’s foreword 5Executive summary 7Introduction 17 1 Maintaining London’s position 33as a world city for culture
страница1/15
Дата02.10.2012
Размер370.18 Kb.
ТипДокументы
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   15
Cultural MetropolisThe Mayor’s Cultural Strategy − 2012 and BeyondContentsMayor’s foreword 5Executive summary 7Introduction 17 1 Maintaining London’s position 33as a world city for culture   2 Widening the reach to excellence 73 3 Education, skills and careers 95 4 Infrastructure, environment 115and the public realm 5 Culture and London in 2012 143 6 Delivering the Cultural Strategy 155 Glossary 165Appendix 169Mayor’s forewordWhen people talk about London and all the things that they most love about living and visiting the city, they invariably nd themselves talking about culture. On any measurement you choose, you will nd that London is a cultural powerhouse, justly renowned across the world. It is a city with more museums than Paris, four UNESCO world heritage sites, nearly twice as many bookshops as New York and with more than 30,000 live music performances a year.It isn’t just our national museums, landmark visitor attractions, beautiful buildings and illustrious institutions. Creativity, beauty and history resonate throughout the city and for some, their most valued cultural experiences will not be a treasure in a famous museum, but visiting an art gallery in the East End, watching a band play in Camden or discovering an exemplar of 17th century baroque architecture. For many others of course, culture is not just a leisure activity but also a living – our dynamic, commercial creative industries provide employment for hundreds of thousands of Londoners.All of this requires continued championing and stewardship. If we don’t constantly remind ourselves of the value of our cultural riches, if we don’t invest in our infrastructure, if we don’t protect our treasures, our buildings and heritage, and if we don’t educate and introduce future generations to the pleasures and value of experiencing and producing culture, then much of this will be lost. This strategy comes at a time when there is understandable concern within the arts and cultural sector about the impact of recent announcements about public funding cuts, at the local and national level. This is clearly a challenging period, but I am determined to make the case for London and to argue strongly for the support it deserves and depends upon.As Mayor of London, I want us to continue to be the greatest cultural capital of the world, a city that attracts millions of people from overseas and the rest of the country each year, but also, of course, one that Londoners, despite the economic climate, nd never-endingly stimulating, provocative and enjoyable. I want to ensure that we make the most of the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity provided by the 2012 London Olympics to showcase our greatest talents to the rest of the world. And I want to make sure that at the local level, the spirit of participation and engagement in culture is unlocked, so that all Londoners, wherever they live and whatever their background, can fully enjoy what is on offer.This strategy will help us to achieve all of this and more. There is no such thing as a single cultural agency for London, and the Greater London Authority is not a major direct investor in arts and culture. Nevertheless, by working closely with strategic funding agencies, local authorities and myriad partners from across the cultural sector, I am condent that we will be able to work towards providing the necessary support and investment, addressing the barriers that exist and put the policies in place that will allow culture in London to flourish.Boris Johnson, Mayor of LondonExecutive summaryIntroductionLondon is one of the most signicant centres of cultural, artistic and intellectual life, with unrivalled collections of art, historical artefacts and architecture stretching across centuries and continents. At the same time, the city sets cutting-edge trends in contemporary culture, attracting the best and brightest of the world’s talent in the arts, fashion, lm, design, music and theatre. The Mayor’s Cultural Strategy recognises the signicance of the cultural and creative sectors in making London a world city, and advocates continued support and investment. It addresses concerns facing the sector at a time of considerable economic uncertainty and rapid change, particularly with regards to government policy and investment, and considers how within this context it can maximise opportunities for the cultural life of London to flourish. Unlike the Mayor’s Transport or Economic Development strategies, the Mayor does not have a single delivery agency for culture and nor is the GLA a major direct funder of culture. Therefore, throughout the strategy, the Mayor identies priorities and works in partnership across the cultural sector and London government, providing leadership and coordination. The development of the strategy was overseen by the London Cultural Strategy Group, chaired by Iwona Blazwick, the Director of Whitechapel Art Gallery. This group was established by the Mayor and is comprised of individuals from key agencies and institutions in the sector. The LCSG has undertaken a wide range of research and consultation activities to develop a close understanding of London’s cultural sector and potential actions for the Mayor and partners to implement. The priorities for the Cultural Strategy are summarised on the following pages.Maintaining London’s position as a world city for culture London is an acknowledged centre for arts and culture and commercial creative industries, all of which make a vital contribution to London’s economy. Not only is the sector a major employer and economic generator, with a turnover of over £18bn, it also plays an important role in terms of boosting the visitor economy and ensuring London’s position as a global capital for creativity and commerce. However, maintaining this position requires sustained investment and support. The recent economic downturn has already had an impact on the sector, particularly in terms of a reduction of private sponsorship and donations and there are widespread concerns around the anticipated reductions in public spending over the next few years.The Mayor will continue to champion the importance of supporting London’s cultural sector, promoting creative businesses and industry support. In addition, the Mayor is working with the sector to tackle other challenges, such as the environment and the impact of excessive regulatory policies and practices that may stifle creativity.Widening the reach to excellenceLondon is renowned for its national and international cultural riches, but it is equally important that the city’s inhabitants have access to high quality local cultural services. Cultural provision varies markedly across the capital. This is especially the case with the outer London boroughs where the sector faces particular challenges in terms of resources and recognition, receiving signicantly less on average from both local and regional funding bodies. The Mayor is also working in other ways to improve access and participation in high quality arts and cultural activities, this includes addressing specic transport issues that have been raised as concerns. The Mayor also endorses attempts by regional funding bodies to better engage with the cultural sector in outer London, and for local authorities to strengthen the quality of their cultural services, such as public libraries. The Mayor is championing initiatives that help improve access to culture, including events, and is doing what he can to support free events and festivals that take place across London.Education, skills and careersCulture can play a major role in making the lives of young Londoners fullling and enjoyable. There is a huge amount of excellent and diverse work being done across the city by a range of organisations. However, either because of geography or socio-economic background, there remain a signicant section of young people who do not access these cultural opportunities.Increasing access to cultural education is not just a case of more organisations or establishing another government programme. What is needed is a strategic approach that helps to coordinate existing activities, build links between cultural institutions, schools and local authorities and raise awareness of the high quality provision on offer. In terms of music education, the Mayor is committed to achieving this through his Making Music Matter: Music Education for London 2010–2012 strategy and annual Rhythm of London event. Building on this we will look to raise the quality of educational provision across all art forms.The future competitiveness of London’s cultural sector will depend heavily on the talents and skills of its workforce. London’s many higher education institutions are especially important with specialist academic strengths in culture attracting students from around the world. These students go on to provide London’s creative businesses with an unrivalled pool of talent. The Mayor is supporting London’s universities in providing a source of innovation and skills for the sector and also efforts to ‘open up’ their knowledge and expertise to engage more widely with Londoners. In addition, by working on the quality of internships and apprenticeships and encouraging volunteering, pathways into the sector will be improved.Infrastructure, environment and the public realmThere is a strong connection between London’s physical environment and its cultural offer. It is crucial that the planning and development processes in the city continue to encourage culture to flourish in the capital’s venues and public spaces. The Mayor’s London Plan – his spatial strategy for the capital – is the main mechanism for achieving this aim. It explicitly addresses the role that culture will play as a strategic part of London’s future. The Mayor has also demonstrated his support for good urban design through London’s Great Outdoors and associated practical documents, Better Streets and Better Green and Water Spaces that, with accompanying investment, set out a vision for revitalising London’s public spaces. The cultural and creative industries are also valued factors in regeneration. The Mayor is working with partners to maximise the opportunities for culture to generate employment and enterprise in priority areas such as Dalston Junction, Brixton town centre and the Olympic Park. The urban landscape also includes the city’s history and traditions, which need to be both protected and celebrated. As recognised in the draft London Plan, constant effort is needed to preserve London’s built environment – not just its iconic buildings, but also the style and character of London’s neighbourhoods that provide so much of its distinctiveness. In addition, much can be done to enhance the public’s engagement with and understanding of London’s history. To this end, the Mayor has established the Story of London festival with the support of the cultural and heritage sector. It provides an opportunity for institutions to present their history and collections in a new way and to encourage all Londoners to celebrate and appreciate the history of their city.London’s spaces can also be brought to life through public art, as well as great events and festivals. The Mayor will continue to be an active supporter of high-quality public art through initiatives like London Underground’s ‘Art on the Underground’ and the Fourth Plinth Commissioning Programme, which in recent years have provided the setting for some of the UK’s most high-prole and most discussed works of art. London is renowned for its festivals, which both animate London’s public realm but also attract visitors to the city. The Mayor is working closely with London boroughs and other partners to ensure that both existing and new events, which are culturally signicant and promote community development as well as contributing to London’s visitor economy, take place across the capital.Culture and London in 2012As well as being the world’s biggest sporting event, the London 2012 Games will be a unique celebration of the rich culture and internationalism of London. Expectations are understandably high, and the challenge is to work together across the sector to form partnerships and produce ambitious works that have been inspired by the Olympic values of international friendship, young people and achieving excellence. In addition to the ofcial Cultural Olympiad projects that the GLA will help to deliver in London, plans are being developed to take place across the capital that will animate spaces and buildings with festivals, productions, exhibitions and cultural activities of every form. The GLA has a leading role to play in channelling the cultural sector’s enthusiasm and project ideas as well as coordinating the city’s celebrations. A key focus of this work is ensuring that there will be opportunities for as many as possible to enjoy and participate in the Cultural Olympiad and that there are high-quality skills training, business support and volunteering programmes.Critical to the success of the 2012 Games will be its physical and socio-economic legacy, particularly in East London, and culture has an important role to play in this. The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park will be the largest designated parkland to be created in Europe for more than 150 years and artists have been involved from an early stage in its design and planning to make sure it continues to attract visitors long after the 2012 Games have nished. Central to the legacy for the park will be the ArcelorMittal Orbit – an iconic sculpture and visitor attraction to be built in the heart of the park, largely funded through private sponsorship. Designed by award winning artist Anish Kapoor, in collaboration with world-renowned structural engineer, Cecil Balmond, it will be the biggest sculpture of its kind in the UK, taller than the Statue of Liberty, and provide unparalleled views of London. The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park will form a central part of East London’s transformed landscape and, together with considerable investment in the fringes of the park and across the Olympic host boroughs, including refurbished buildings and revitalised historic places, will signicantly enhance the public realm.Delivering the Cultural StrategyIn order to deliver on the objectives outlined in the strategy and to monitor progress, the GLA is working with a range of organisations and individuals.The London Cultural Strategy Group is central to this, but equally vital are bodies like London Councils, the borough-led London Cultural Improvement Programme and the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad Board. GLA ofcers are actively engaged with these groups on a regular basis, mindful that it is through working with existing groups, rather than by establishing new ones, that coordination can be best achieved and duplication avoided. The GLA is also working to provide a robust evidence and policy base in order to inform ongoing support for London’s cultural sector. IntroductionAt the start of the 21st century, London is one of the most signicant centres of cultural, artistic and intellectual life. Nearly two millennia old, the city is a rich repository of world culture, with unrivalled collections of art, historical artefacts and architecture stretching across centuries and continents. At the same time, the city continues to set cutting-edge trends in contemporary culture, attracting the best and brightest of the world’s talent in the arts, fashion, lm, design, music and theatre. The Mayor’s Cultural Strategy recognises the signicance of culture in making London a world city, and puts forward a case for its continued support and investment. It does so within the context of economic uncertainty and a rapidly changing policy landscape, in which it is more important than ever to be clear about the value of London’s cultural and creative sector.Culture is widely recognised as a major factor in London’s success. It is a key reason why people visit – seven out of ten tourists cite culture as a reason for their stay. London is the most visited city on the planet and receives almost as many visitors annually as Paris and New York put together. People move to London because it is one of the most cosmopolitan and welcoming cities on earth, and businesses relocate here because it attracts dynamic professionals from a range of sectors. London’s commercial creative industries also generate substantial wealth for the UK economy. The latest ofcial data from GLA Economics, published in 2010, showed that the creative industries in London in 2007 employed 386,000 people, plus 411,000 people who work in creative jobs outside the creative industries, totalling 797,000. The gross value added (GVA) of the creative industries was £18.545bn.1This strategy also advocates the value of culture for what it brings to human experience and understanding. Throughout history, different cities have been important crucibles of culture, where new ideas, thinkers and artists have gathered: Athens in the 5th and 4th centuries BC, Florence in the 15th century, Paris in the early 20th century; London can lay claim to being such a place today, providing a space for debate, discussion, invention and creativity that can truly shape and enhance our world. For this reason alone, it is important for the GLA to strategically support this remarkably vibrant cultural landscape and help address the challenges and opportunities facing individuals and organisations.Much has changed since the rst Cultural Strategy for London was published in 2004. In 2005, London won the honour of hosting the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. That same year, Londoners experienced the tragedy of the 7 July bombings. In the last two years, the UK entered into the worst economic recession since the 1920s. Finally, of course, in 2008 London elected a new Mayor and in May 2010 a new national government was elected. Therefore, whilst this Cultural Strategy builds upon the analysis developed in 2004, it necessarily takes all of these into account. It is also important to note that there have been signicant changes in the course of producing the strategy, particularly in terms of government policy, making it difcult to develop Londonwide policies that may not themselves be subject to change.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   15

Похожие:

Mayor’s foreword 5Executive summary 7Introduction 17 1 Maintaining London’s position 33as a world city for culture iconForeword by Ken Livingstone, Mayor of London

Mayor’s foreword 5Executive summary 7Introduction 17 1 Maintaining London’s position 33as a world city for culture iconForeword by Ken Livingstone, Mayor of London

Mayor’s foreword 5Executive summary 7Introduction 17 1 Maintaining London’s position 33as a world city for culture iconForeword by Ken Livingstone, Mayor of London VI

Mayor’s foreword 5Executive summary 7Introduction 17 1 Maintaining London’s position 33as a world city for culture iconGlaeconomics laying the foundations London’s construction industry February 2006 Transport for London London Development Agency Mayor of London Greater London Authority

Mayor’s foreword 5Executive summary 7Introduction 17 1 Maintaining London’s position 33as a world city for culture iconThis is London’s Economic Development Strategy, prepared by the London Development Agency (lda) on behalf of the Mayor of London. It replaces the 2001 Strategy

Mayor’s foreword 5Executive summary 7Introduction 17 1 Maintaining London’s position 33as a world city for culture iconThe Old City of London and the communities surrounding it form one political unit. This area is called Greater London

Mayor’s foreword 5Executive summary 7Introduction 17 1 Maintaining London’s position 33as a world city for culture icon1. 1 The London 2012 Directorate supports the Mayor in delivering his responsibilities and priorities with respect to the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic

Mayor’s foreword 5Executive summary 7Introduction 17 1 Maintaining London’s position 33as a world city for culture iconMayor of london

Mayor’s foreword 5Executive summary 7Introduction 17 1 Maintaining London’s position 33as a world city for culture iconThe Mayor of London’s Annual Report

Mayor’s foreword 5Executive summary 7Introduction 17 1 Maintaining London’s position 33as a world city for culture iconThe Mayor’s Outer London Commission: Report

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница