Volume 21-3 of this journal (two issues ago; it may still be freshly on your desk as this one is arriving in the mail) included two sermons for observing




НазваниеVolume 21-3 of this journal (two issues ago; it may still be freshly on your desk as this one is arriving in the mail) included two sermons for observing
страница1/19
Дата02.10.2012
Размер1 Mb.
ТипДокументы
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   19
From the Editor

Volume 21-3 of this journal (two issues ago; it may still be freshly on your desk as this one is arriving in the mail) included two sermons for observing 9/11/11, the tenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington. At the time that issue went to press, the alleged mastermind of the plot, Osama bin Laden, was still at large. But on May 2, a United States operation into Pakistan found and killed him.

My guess is that sermons that were actually preached on September 11—including those that were based on the excellent materials written for us by Nolan Astley and Steve Albers—incorporated this “closing of the book” on the tragedy. I wonder what they said. What should they have said? And rather than just second-guessing, what should we learn for future preaching about notorious evil or evildoers?

We all realize, certainly, that God takes “no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but that the wicked turn from his way and live” (Ezek 33:11). It’s always a reason for grieving when any unbeliever’s time of grace comes to an end and he is consigned to an eternity in hell. We realize, too, that if bin Laden is indeed now in hell, it’s not because his wickedness in plotting 9/11 was any more deserving of damnation than my impatience with Claire and the kids. He is indeed, we fear, in eternal suffering because (although we weren’t given a look into his heart at the moment of his death) it appears he relied for his salvation on a religion that does not trust in Christ Jesus. All of this should cause us true sadness.

On the other hand, we yet also understand that it is God himself who gives governments the power to enforce justice, even to the point of executing criminals. “[The one who is in authority] is God’s servant for your good. But if you do wrong, be afraid, for he does not bear the sword in vain” (Rom 13:4). Even without a trial, surely the evidence—particularly his own claims—demonstrates that bin Laden fell under this stricture of Scripture.

What we might not remember is that there’s a whole biblical genre specifically devoted to this sort of discussion. Nobody’s best known and probably nobody’s favorite. It’s the so-called imprecatory psalms. Psalms such as 35, 69, 109, and 137 offer such dainties as that the evildoer’s “children be fatherless . . . wander about and beg” and that he be “blessed . . . who takes your little ones and dashes them against the rock!”

Dean Wenthe doesn’t specifically address the imprecatory psalms in his article, “The Psalms as Homiletical Resource” (p. 3), but to our conversation he adds this: “The imprecatory psalms are concerned with the integrity of God’s character. Every power or person who denies God’s being invites judgment, for the nature of God is pure, holy, and the basis of all reality. To pray the imprecatory psalms is to say: ‘Let God be God.’ ”

Less than pleasant. God’s alien, not his proper, work. But letting God be God.

Not exactly the first texts or topic we look to preach as we enter Christmastide. But a powerful reminder of the fallen world into which Christ came and which Christ came to redeem!

Carl C. Fickenscher II

• Editor: Carl C. Fickenscher II

• Managing Editor: Scot A. Kinnaman

• Designer: Chris Johnson

• Advisory Board

Parish Pastors: Nolan Astley (LCC), Dean W. Nadasdy, Henry A. Simon

Seminary Professors: Paul J. Grime, Glenn A. Nielsen, John T. Pless, David R. Schmitt

Council of Presidents: Herbert C. Mueller Jr.


Copyright © 2011 Concordia Publishing House

3558 S. Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, MO 63118-3968

1-800-325-3040 • www.cph.org • cpr@cph.org

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, or otherwise, without purchasing this product from Concordia Publishing House. Through this registered purchase, you are granted a nontransferable license to use this product and adapt it for your personal or congregational use. Permission also is granted to duplicate portions for classroom purposes. For all other permission requests, contact CPH at 1-800-325-0191 or copyrights@cph.org.

Scripture quotations from the ESV Bible® (The Holy Bible, English Standard Version®), copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Quotations taken from the notes, introductory material, or original articles from The Lutheran Study Bible © 2009 by Concordia Publishing House. All rights reserved.

Quotations marked LSB are from Lutheran Service Book, copyright © 2006 Concordia Publishing House. All rights reserved.

Quotations marked LSB Altar Book are from Lutheran Service Book: Altar Book¸ copyright © 2006 Concordia Publishing House. All rights reserved.

The quotations from the Lutheran Confessions in this publication are from Concordia: The Lutheran Confessions, second edition, copyright © 2006 Concordia Publishing House. All rights reserved.

Catechism quotations are from Luther’s Small Catechism with Explanation, second edition, copyright © 1986, 1991 Concordia Publishing House.

This work uses the SBL Hebrew Unicode font developed by the Font Foundation, under the leadership of the Society of Biblical Literature. For further information on this font or on becoming a Font Foundation member, see http://www.sbl-site.org/educational/biblicalfonts.aspx..

This publication may be available in braille, in large print, or on cassette tape for the visually impaired. Please allow 8 to 12 weeks for delivery. Write to Lutheran Blind Mission, 7550 Watson Rd., St. Louis, MO 63119-4409; call toll-free 1-888-215-2455; or visit the Web site: www.blindmission.org.

Concordia Pulpit Resources (ISSN 1057-1833), published quarterly, succeeds Concordia Pulpit, an annual volume of sermons published from 1930 to 1990. The Sunday themes of the sermon studies and children’s messages are coordinated with CPH’s Every Sunday Bulletins and Creative Worship for the Lutheran Parish, a quarterly publication including ready-to-edit worship services in print format and CD-ROM.

Annual subscriptions in the United States are $54.99 ($64.99 for print and Internet access). Order by mail, online at http://cpr.cph.org, or phone: 1-800-325-3040. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Concordia Pulpit Resources, 3558 S. Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, MO 63118-3875. Manufactured in the United States of America.

Please send your feedback to the editor at cpr@cph.org.

Published by Concordia Publishing House of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod
Volume 22, Part 1, Series B

November 27, 2011–February 19, 2012

Articles

The Psalms as Homiletical Resource—Dean O. Wenthe


Children’s Messages: One Pastor’s Story about Telling Stories for Children—
Mark D. Barz


Features

From the Editor

Pastors Conference

Ideas for Illustrating

Book Review


Sermon Studies

Advent 1, 1 Corinthians 1:3–9
Ready and Waiting . . . Waiting and Ready—Mark D. Barz


Advent 2, 2 Peter 3:8–14
Advent Patience, Perish, Passing,
Advent People, Promise, Peace—
Mark D. Barz


Advent 3, 1 Thessalonians 5:16–24
Dos, Don’ts, and Done—Robert F. Rossow


Advent 4, Romans 16:25–27
Soli Deo Gloria —Robert F. Rossow


Christmas Day, John 1:1–14 (15–18)
The Great Surprise: The Word among Us—Peter F. Gregory


Circumcision and Name of Jesus, Luke 2:21
Beginning with Bloodshed—Peter F. Gregory


Epiphany 1: The Baptism of Our Lord, Romans 6:1–11
The New Life of the Baptized—Jeffrey E. Sippy


Epiphany 2, 1 Corinthians 6:12–20
What Will You Do with the Body?—John T. Pless


Epiphany 3, Mark 1:14–20
The Decisive Time for Turning—Glenn A. Nielsen


Epiphany 4, Mark 1:21–28
An Unexpected Salvation—James G. Bushur


Epiphany 5, Mark 1:29–39
Out of the Desolate Places Comes
Our Eternal Destiny—Glenn A. Nielsen


Epiphany 6, Mark 1:40–45
When Jesus Touches You, Jesus Heals You—Jeffrey E. Sippy


The Transfiguration of Our Lord, 2 Kings 2:1–12
Enter Jesus—Reginald C. Quirk


Special Sermons

Advent Midweek Series

Wait, Pray, and Live by Faith: Waiting with the Old Testament Church—Timothy C. J. Quill

1. Advent Midweek 1: Waiting with Prayer
Isaiah 64:1–9

2. Advent Midweek 2: Waiting with Comfort
Isaiah 40:1–11

3. Advent Midweek 3: Waiting with Joy
Isaiah 61:1–4, 8–11

4. Advent Midweek 4: Waiting with Worship
2 Samuel 7:1–11, 16


First Sunday in Advent:
A Sermon Celebrating the Faith of Jan Kilian
in the 200th Year of His Birth, Isaiah 64:1–9
We Are All Your People!—David Zersen


Christmas Eve, Isaiah 7:14
God with Us—Reginald C. Quirk


New Year’s Eve, Romans 8:31b–39
What’s Your Resolution?—Thomas R. Johnson


The Epiphany of Our Lord, Matthew 2:1–12
Epiphany Melodrama—Reginald C. Quirk


Third Sunday after the Epiphany:
Sanctity of Human Life Sunday, Jonah 3
Our Relenting God—James I. Lamb


A Christmas Wedding Sermon, Isaiah 61:10
A Beautiful Illustration—Carl C. Fickenscher II


Children’s Messages

Advent 1–2—Mark D. Barz


Advent 3–4, Epiphany 2, 4—Ruth Geisler


Christmas Eve—Carl C. Fickenscher II


Christmas Day, New Year’s Day—Peter F. Gregory


Epiphany 1, 6—Jeffrey E. Sippy


Epiphany 3, 5—Glenn A. Nielsen


Transfiguration—Reginald C. Quirk


Suggested Hymns

Pastors Conference

Your Responses to Practical Preaching Questions

Q: Besides Law and Gospel, what else have you noticed that’s distinctive about Lutheran preaching?

A: Certainly Law and Gospel are distinctive elements of Lutheran preaching. The Law condemns; the Gospel forgives. The Law tells us what man must do; the Gospel tells us what Christ has done. Law and Gospel give us the framework and dynamic structure of the sermon, which, of course, may actually be played out in many different forms, not just a two-part, Law-then-Gospel outline. (This dynamic structure might be thought of as “Law and Gospel,” as in the three words describing one singular concept.)

However, the most important distinctive of Lutheran preaching is the content. As St. Paul says, “We preach Christ crucified” (1 Cor 1:23). The content of all Law-Gospel preaching is the cross of Christ. Because of our failure and sin, Jesus died on the cross; and yet because of his great love for us, Jesus died on the cross. To preach “Jesus died for you” is a statement of both Law and Gospel at the same time, all centered in the cross of Christ. (That is to say, the matter of content is also “Law and Gospel,” but here we might think of the two, “Law” and “Gospel,” as two separate elements always to be preached in conjunction.)

Another important distinctive of Lutheran preaching is its application. It is performative; it does something. Lutheran preaching is not merely self-help advice. Just as the words of the Absolution actually deliver forgiveness of sins, so, too, the words of the sermon deliver forgiveness and strengthening of faith by declaring God’s love for you through the cross of Christ. I love to switch from third person pronouns to second person to emphasize and apply the Gospel of Christ crucified for you.

Rather than simply telling you how to be a better Christian (which is all Law, empty of the cross, and neglects strengthening one in faith), Lutheran preaching points to the Gospel—Christ crucified for you.

Rev. Martin Measel, pastor

Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church, Stevensville, Michigan


A: I grew up in an LCMS parsonage and for years heard no kind of sermon other than Lutheran. When I was in college, I was so bored I decided to visit a number of other Christian churches that were not Lutheran, thinking I might find something more interesting. After two months of trying a different congregation each Sunday, I came back to my Lutheran congregation and found out what a great blessing we have in Lutheran homiletics.

Beside the intentional use and proper distinction of Law and Gospel, I learned that a key element that is not always heard in sermons of those other denominations is a clear focus on what the Gospel itself actually is: God’s grace.

It is easy for sermons to lean so heavily on what the listeners should be doing in response to God’s Word that it leaves the hearers feeling the frustration of sin’s effect in their lives, burdening their consciences. The sincere listener tries hard to do what God wants—and regularly comes up short of the perfection demanded. So when he or she then hears a sermon emphasizing that we should try harder, the guilty conscience becomes burdened even more.

When a sermon has properly used the balance of Law and Gospel—so that God’s grace is the predominant focus—the undeserved love of God in Jesus is brought to the attention of the hearer clearly, so that the forgiveness of sin God offers lifts the burden, refreshing the hearer’s faith in Jesus. This gift of God’s grace is the encouragement the hearer needs—the relief of knowing God has not simply said, “Go and sin no more!” but has also said, “I am with you.”

This, I was glad to discover, is a distinctive of Lutheran preaching and must continue to be heard clearly to the glory of God. Without it, the sermon is just another motivational speech.

Rev. Joel Holls, pastor

Angelica Lutheran Church, Allen Park, Michigan


Upcoming Topics

22-2: Why do you use the pulpit when you preach . . . or why do you not? (Thank you for your responses.)

22-3: What’s your absolute favorite, original-with-you sermon illustration? (Submit by December 1, 2011.)

22-4: What have you learned about or for preaching from Martin Luther? (Submit by March 1, 2012.)

23-1: What’s the least helpful tip you received in a hom class at the sem? (Go ahead. We can take it!) (Submit by June 1, 2012.)

Let us hear from you! Responses should be a maximum of 250 words and may be sent to Editor, Concordia Pulpit Resources, 3558 S. Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, MO 63118-3875 or e-mailed to cpr@cph.org. We also invite suggestions for future topics.

The Psalms as Homiletical Resource

Rev. Dean O. Wenthe, PhD, professor, president emeritus, Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, Indiana


The Psalms present the pastor with a rich and distinctive spectrum of texts for expounding and preaching God’s gracious character in Christ for God’s people and their lives.

The Psalms uniquely offer prayers, laments, and hymns by inspired poets. Here we know that sentiments and situations are neither confusing nor obscuring the relationship of God with humanity. Whether it is a hymn of praise or a lament, the Psalms rightly portray God’s character and human character as they interact in the diverse situations of life. Such portrayals offer the pastor Sacred Scripture that describes sentiments easily recognized by his listeners.

Human emotion—such a wonderful part of human nature—if left to lead and define us, can slip into confusion and become a roller-coaster ride of highs and lows with the overall trend downward. But the Psalms bring God’s definition and discipline to our emotions, while fully recognizing them as central components of every human.

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   19

Похожие:

Volume 21-3 of this journal (two issues ago; it may still be freshly on your desk as this one is arriving in the mail) included two sermons for observing iconNote to pre-interns. Included in this section on American literature is an overview of major issues and themes as well as brief discussions of the works of

Volume 21-3 of this journal (two issues ago; it may still be freshly on your desk as this one is arriving in the mail) included two sermons for observing icon2- "Corporate hedging and risk management theory: evidence from Polish listed companies", Author(s): Karol Marek Klimczak, Journal: The Journal of Risk Finance, Year: 2008 Volume: 9 Issue: 1 Page: 20 – 39

Volume 21-3 of this journal (two issues ago; it may still be freshly on your desk as this one is arriving in the mail) included two sermons for observing icon[Volume 99, Issues 2-3] Deformation and relaxation of Newtonian drops in planar extensional flows of a Boger fluid

Volume 21-3 of this journal (two issues ago; it may still be freshly on your desk as this one is arriving in the mail) included two sermons for observing iconAuthor year title journal volume page

Volume 21-3 of this journal (two issues ago; it may still be freshly on your desk as this one is arriving in the mail) included two sermons for observing iconJournal of Information Technology Education Volume 7, 2008

Volume 21-3 of this journal (two issues ago; it may still be freshly on your desk as this one is arriving in the mail) included two sermons for observing iconInternational journal of environmental sciences volume 1, No 6, 2011

Volume 21-3 of this journal (two issues ago; it may still be freshly on your desk as this one is arriving in the mail) included two sermons for observing iconJournal of Postsecondary Education and Disability Volume 22, Number 3 2010

Volume 21-3 of this journal (two issues ago; it may still be freshly on your desk as this one is arriving in the mail) included two sermons for observing iconEuropean Journal of Social Sciences Volume 6, Number 1 (2008)

Volume 21-3 of this journal (two issues ago; it may still be freshly on your desk as this one is arriving in the mail) included two sermons for observing iconJournal of Postsecondary Education and Disability Volume 24(2), Spring 2011

Volume 21-3 of this journal (two issues ago; it may still be freshly on your desk as this one is arriving in the mail) included two sermons for observing iconJournal of Postsecondary Education and Disability Volume 25(3), Fall 2012

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница