Laboratory director: assistant laboratory director




Скачать 137.72 Kb.
НазваниеLaboratory director: assistant laboratory director
страница1/3
Дата01.10.2012
Размер137.72 Kb.
ТипДокументы
  1   2   3
A215 BASIC HUMAN ANATOMY

SYLLABUS OF INFORMATION AND POLICIES SUMMER 2012


COURSE DIRECTOR:

Steve Dougherty

Jordan Hall 003

855-9742 or 855-0616

Email: gdougher@indiana.edu

Office hours: By appointment


COURSE COORDINATOR and

LABORATORY DIRECTOR: ASSISTANT LABORATORY DIRECTOR:

Mr. Jim Heersma Mr. Jim Knowlton

Classroom Building 126 Jordan Hall 003

855-0948 856-1063

Email: jheersma@indiana.edu Email: jrknowlt@indiana.edu

Office hours: By appointment Office hours: By appointment


ANATOMY OFFICE: LAB – ASSOCIATE INSTRUCTORS (A.I.s):

Jordan Hall, 104 ____________________ ____________________

855-0616 ____________________ ____________________

____________________ ____________________

LECTURE UTA:

Elizabeth Farra UTA: ____________________

Email: efarra@indiana.edu

Office Hours: To be determined


TEXTBOOKS:

Human Anatomy, Michael McKinley and Valerie Dean OLoughlin, 3rd Edition, 2012

A215 Laboratory and Study Guide, Fall 2011

(See last page of the syllabus for specifics regarding the textbooks)

COURSE WEBSITE URL:


http://www.indiana.edu/~a215doug/


QUESTIONS - Whom to Contact:

Contact ASSOCIATE INSTRUCTORS (AIs) about:

-questions over lab material

-lab exam questions or scoring

Contact the LAB DIRECTOR about

-rescheduling (or making up missed) lab EXAMS

-posted exam scores and grades

-unresolved lab problems or questions

Contact the LAB DIRECTOR AND ASSISTANT LAB DIRECTOR (NOT AI’s) about:

-rescheduling labs due to conflicts

-making up missed labs

Contact the LAB DIRECTOR (or the ASSISTANT LAB DIRECTOR) about:

-questions over lab material

Contact the COURSE DIRECTOR about:

-rescheduling lecture exams; making up missed lecture exams

-questions about lecture material

-lecture exam questions

-withdrawals and incompletes

COURSE DESCRIPTION:


This course presents a systemic approach to the study of the human body. Lecture presentation begins with an introduction of anatomical terminology and an overview of cellular processes and tissue classification. Students then are introduced to the gross and microscopic anatomy of the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive. The laboratory component of the course generally parallels and reinforces lecture concepts through the use of models, histological slides, skeletal materials and cadaver demonstration. Lecture meets daily. Students also attend four 2-hour labs per week.


LEARNING GOALS:

to understand the hierarchy of structural organization:

  • describe the different levels of structural organization to become familiar with anatomical and medical terminology:

  • dissect out the individual components of a term to determine its meaning

to understand the relationship between cellular structures and function:

  • relate the anatomical construct to the primary function of cellular structures

  • identify (by light microscopy or by description) specific cellular types and their functions

  • describe and identify (by light microscopy) the stages of cell division

to develop an understanding of different tissue types and their intimate relationships:

  • relate the functioning of different cellular types to the human system in which they are located

  • demonstrate the understanding of how cells are organized to form specific tissue types

  • describe the structure, location, and function of specific tissue types

  • identify these tissues by description or by light microscopy

to know the structure of the integumentary system:

  • identify (by light microscopy or by description) the different tissues and structures comprising the skin

  • describe the organization of the skin

to identify and understand the interplay of the components of the skeletal system:

  • describe the associated structures of a given bone

  • identify the microscopic organization of bone tissue either by description or by microscopy

  • identify bones on models or as preserved specimens

  • describe the processes of bone growth and repair

to understand the action and anatomy of a skeletal muscle:

  • discuss the gross structure of the skeletal muscle

  • discuss the microscopic structure of the skeletal muscle cell

  • describe (briefly) the physiology of muscle contraction

  • identify the microscopic components of a muscle cell

  • identify on models or on the cadaver the major muscles of the body

  • describe the action(s) of the major muscles of the body

to know the structure of and the movement at an articulation:

  • describe the generic structure of a synovial joint

  • relate the movement at an articulation to its anatomical construct

  • demonstrate the understanding of the differences between the fibrous, cartilaginous, and synovial joints

to demonstrate knowledge of the external and internal anatomy of the nervous system:

  • identify similarities and differences between the structural components of the nervous system

  • identify the microscopic components of the nervous system

  • relate nervous system structures to their basic function


to demonstrate knowledge of the endocrine system and to relate it to the nervous system as a means by which it directs the functioning of the human body:

  • identify the components of the endocrine system on models or preserved specimens

  • identify the microscopic anatomy of endocrine organs

  • discuss the functional importance of the major endocrine organs

to identify the components of the circulatory system, including blood, arteries, veins, and the heart:

  • demonstrate the ability to trace the flow of blood through the heart

  • identify on models or preserved specimens the major arterial and venous branches in the human body

  • describe the anatomy of a blood vessel wall

  • identify by description or by light microscopy the blood cells and describe their primary function

to demonstrate knowledge of the lymphatic system:

  • identify by description or by light microscopy the organs of the lymphatic system

  • describe the primary function of the major lymphatic organs

  • identify on models or preserved specimens the major organs of the lymphatic system

to demonstrate knowledge of the anatomy of the respiratory, digestive, and urinary systems:

  • identify by description or by light microscopy the major organs of these systems

  • describe (briefly) the primary function of the major organs of these systems

  • identify on models or preserved specimens the major organs of these systems

  • complete a blood flow pathway through the kidney

  • complete a urine flow pathway from the kidney to the exterior of the body

  • complete an air flow pathway through the respiratory system

  • describe the anatomy of the major organs of each of these systems

to know the male and female reproductive anatomy:

  • identify by description or by light microscopy the major organs of the reproductive systems

  • describe (briefly) the primary function of the major organs of the reproductive systems

  • identify on models or preserved specimens the major organs of the reproductive systems

  • describe the anatomy of the major organs of the reproductive systems

  • complete a flow diagram of sperm movement from the seminiferous tubule to the exterior of the body

  • relate the process of follicle development to the anatomy of the ovary

  • discuss the process of sperm development


WITHDRAWALS AND INCOMPLETES:

We will adhere to University policies. Under Indiana University policies:

  • “A grade of Incomplete (I) may be given only when the work of the course is substantially completed and when the student’s work is of passing quality” (Indiana University Bulletin, College of Arts & Sciences). If a student is given an incomplete, the existing exam grades remain “on the books” for the student, and the student may make up only the material he/she had to miss.

  • Any student with a grade of I on record for A215 may remove that grade ONLY by arrangement with the current course director; re-registration for A215 by any such student to remove an I is invalid.

  • If your dean permits you to withdraw after the date for an automatic W, the course director will give you a W (if your grade is D- or better) or an F (if your grade at that point is an F).


EXAMS:


Each lab or lecture exam will deal only with the material covered since the last exam (see schedules). Exams, including the final, are not cumulative.


Unless announced differently, lecture exams will be given in Rawles Hall 100, NOT in the lecture room.


EXAM RESULTS AND GRADES:


Grading: I. The lecture contribution to the grade is based on the following possible point total: 400 POINTS


360 possible lecture-exam POINTS: Four 90-POINT exams will be given. These will be one-hour, 45 questions, 2 points per question, multiple-choice exams. (Lecture exams are not returned to students.)


40 possible quiz POINTS: There will be 10 online quizzes (worth 5 points each) throughout the semester. Of these ten quizzes, only the eight highest will be counted toward the student’s grade. Since the two lowest quiz scores will automatically be dropped, there will be NO MAKE-UPS for missed quizzes regardless of the reason.


How to Take an Online Quizzes: Students will be required to complete and submit online quizzes using QuizSite. The quizzes can be accessed through http://www.indiana.edu/~best/ or through the course website http://www.indiana.edu/~a215doug/ using your University ID and passphrase (that is, the passphrase that goes with your @indiana.edu username). Quizzes will be made available within a couple days before they’re due. You will have until 10:00 pm on the due date to submit your answers. Please see the class schedule for the exact due dates (notation “Q” indicates the day a quiz is due).


Late submissions will not be scored so do not wait until the last minute. You can access and view a quiz anytime on the two days before it is due, so you can see and review questions, even print them if you wish, but you are allowed only one submission of your answers. Answers are not final until you push the “proceed” button! If there is any issue with submitting answers, please contact the lecture instructor as soon as possible. Submission issues that come up later on the day a quiz is due may not be dealt with in time so, again, please do not wait until the last minute!


20 possible Bonus Points: These points can be earned by participating in unannounced quizzes, problems, or questions given during lectures throughout the semester. To qualify for the points, you must be in lecture and sign in on the day the bonus assignment is given. Bonus points are added to your cumulative course score and have the potential of improving your final grade. Please note, since these are bonus points, there will be NO MAKE-UPS for missed bonus point opportunities regardless of the reason.

II. The laboratory contribution to the grade is based on the following point total: 400 points:


400 possible Lab Exam Points: Four100-point exams will be given. These exams will be less than one hour, with 40 questions at 2 points per question. The point total (out of 80) will be multiplied by a factor of 1.25 in order to make the test worth 100 points. Each test will be fill-in-the-blank identification with questions on microscopic observation, models, and/or preserved specimens. (Answer sheets will be returned to students in lab.)


Total Course POINTS = 800 (50% from lecture and 50% from lab)

  1   2   3

Похожие:

Laboratory director: assistant laboratory director iconPrepared for the National Science Foundation by Thomas a furness III, pi, Director, Human Interface Technology Laboratory

Laboratory director: assistant laboratory director iconLicensure and Certification Number Year Licensure 00132 dir 1994 Nevada Medical Laboratory Director License Number Year Certification

Laboratory director: assistant laboratory director iconLanl (Los Alamos National Laboratory), July 21, 1988. “Requestor Data Sheet #7132, ta-21-61, pcb survey ta-21,” Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New

Laboratory director: assistant laboratory director iconDirector of Community Health Programs and Executive Director of the Association for Community Health Improvement for

Laboratory director: assistant laboratory director icon4 октября 2011 г компания ProQuest
«ProQuest Day» с участием ключевых менеджеров и специалистов компании: Mr. Jan Hames, Vice –President for International Sales; Mr....
Laboratory director: assistant laboratory director iconThis course is taken with a laboratory section

Laboratory director: assistant laboratory director iconAdvanced undergraduate laboratory

Laboratory director: assistant laboratory director iconFor all practical (laboratory) courses

Laboratory director: assistant laboratory director iconThursdays 3: 30-5: 15 p m., in the Publishing Laboratory (gl 107)

Laboratory director: assistant laboratory director iconUws laboratory Safety Guidelines

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница