Please note that these outlines are for 2011-12. The timetabling and course content for these course units may change in 2012-13




НазваниеPlease note that these outlines are for 2011-12. The timetabling and course content for these course units may change in 2012-13
страница1/77
Дата27.09.2012
Размер6.14 Mb.
ТипДокументы
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   77
Politics

Level Two

Course Units

2012-13

Below you will find the course outlines for all Politics level two course units.

Please note that these outlines are for 2011-12. The timetabling and course content for these course units may change in 2012-13.




Contents



Course Unit Code

Course Title

POLI20511

The Politics of Globalisation & Development

POLI20522

Questions About International Politics

POLI20532

British Politics & Society Since 1940: from Blitz to the 'Big Society'

POLI20542

Social Movements for Political Change

POLI20602

Arguing About Politics

POLI20612

Chinese Politics Today

POLI20801

The Politics of Policy Making

POLI20881

Freedom & Equality

POLI20900

Politics Project

POLI20911

Comparative European Politics

POLI20921

France Under the Fifth Republic (This course unit will run in semester 2 of 2012-13 as POLI20922)

POLI20932

The National Politics of Germany (This course unit will run in semester 1 of 2012-13 as POLI20931)

POLI20941

Mediterranean Politics (This course unit will run in semester 2 of 2012-13 as POLI20942)



To jump straight to a course guide type the Course Unit Code into the Find box on the tool bar across the top of the page. (If you cannot see this use the keyboard combination Ctrl + F)


SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

POLITICS

COURSE UNIT OUTLINE 2011/12

POLI20511

The Politics of Globalization and Development

Semester: One

Credits: 20

Lecturer:

Dr Stuart Shields

Room:

4.023 Arthur Lewis Building

Telephone:

0161 275 7824

Email:

stuart.shields@manchester.ac.uk

Office Hours:

Please book via SOHOL at

www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/ug/sohol/

Tutors: Fabiola Mieres, Giulia Sirigu, David Tobin, Oliver Turner

Lectures: There are two lectures every week:

Tuesday 14.00-15.00 in G51 Chemistry Building

Thursday 15.00-16.00 Chaplaincy Theatre, St Peters House

Tutorials: Allocate yourself to a tutorial group using the Student System

Mode of assessment: One 2500 word essay. One 2 hour exam. One tutorial portfolio.

Reading week: 31 October to 4 November

Administrators: Philippa Wilson and Julie Gandy, UG Office G.001 Arthur Lewis

***IMPORTANT INFORMATION – PLEASE READ***

Essay hand in date: 14.00 on Monday 5th December 2011

Seminar Portfolio hand in date: 14.00 on Monday 12th December 2011

This course guide must be read in conjunction with Part II: Course Unit Guide. Copies may be obtained from the POLI20511 Blackboard site, the Politics Undergraduate Office, ground floor of the Arthur Lewis Building. It provides information on various issues including transferable skills, referencing, and our policy on plagiarism.

Communication: Students must read their University e-mails regularly, as important information will be communicated in this way.


Course aims:

This course aims to introduce students to the academic discipline of International Political Economy (IPE). IPE is a vibrant and rapidly growing field of study that emerged in the early 1970s. At the most basic level it is concerned with the connections between politics and economics, the national and the global, within contemporary world order. However such a simple definition raises as many questions as it answers! Through a critical exploration of globalization and development, students will be introduced to the main theoretical and policy debates in IPE, the impact of globalization on contemporary world order, and the issues surrounding development and under-development. The course is organized around a constantly evolving series of major issues in world order such as neoliberalism, forms of resistance, the importance of global finance, global migration, the persistence of poverty and inequality, and concerns around environmental change, depending on events in any given year.


Learning Outcomes:

On completion of this unit successful participants will:

  1. Be familiar with the key concepts and theoretical debates in IPE

  2. Be familiar with the major issues in contemporary world order related to globalization and development.

  3. Have enhanced critical, evaluative, and communicative skills through participation in class discussions, delivery of class presentations, and production of course essays.



Course organization:

Lecture schedule

Lecture 1

Introduction

Lecture 2

What is IPE?

Historical precursors to globalization

Lecture 3

From Empires to Bretton Woods

Lecture 4

From Bretton Woods to the Global Political Economy

Theoretical approaches to IPE

Lecture 5

Contextualizing IPE, globalization and development

Lecture 6

Mercantilism

Lecture 7

Liberalism

Lecture 8

Marxism

Lecture 9

Critical Theory

Lecture 10

Feminism

Issues in contemporary world order

Lecture 11

Trade and development

Lecture 12

Production and transnational corporations

Lecture 13

Global finance

Lecture 14

Essay writing workshop

Lecture 15

The state

Lecture 16

National models of capitalism in an era of globalisation

Lecture 17

International institutions and governance in a global political economy

Lecture 18

The environment

Lecture 19

Alternatives to neoliberalism

Lecture 20

A crisis in capitalism or a crisis of capitalism?



PowerPoint slides will available to download after the lecture from the course Blackboard site. You should come to lectures prepared to take notes rather than fill in the margins of a PowerPoint slide! Remember – the slides alone will not be adequate resources for learning or successful completion of the course.


Recommended texts:

The closest book I can suggest to a set text for this course is:

  • Robert O'Brien and Marc Williams (2010) Global Political Economy: Evolution and Dynamics, Palgrave Macmillan.

It’s expensive at £25.99 but covers the basics of the course and I’ll use as much of this book as possible for readings.

There are also a number of other appropriate texts with relevant reading for this course. They will be available at local bookshop Blackwells, and all available in paperback:

  • Appelbaum, R. & Robinson, W. (eds.) (2005) Critical Globalization Studies, London Routledge.

  • Burnell, P. and Randall, V (2008) Politics in the Developing World, 2nd edition, Oxford: OUP

  • McMichael, P. (2008) Development and Change: A Global Perspective, 4th edition, London: Sage.

  • Stubbs, R. & Underhill, G. (eds.), (2006) Political Economy and the Changing Global Order, 3rd Edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.



Tutorials:

Attendance at tutorials is compulsory.

You are expected to make every effort to attend all tutorials on this course. If you know in advance that circumstances beyond your control will prevent you from attending a tutorial, you should contact the tutor with this information. If you are unable to do this, you should explain your absence as soon as possible. You should not wait to be contacted for non-attendance. Unexcused absences can lead to an unsatisfactory report at the end of the course (affecting job references by other tutors), and may even result in exclusion from this course or a refusal to allow you to resit a failed exam. The University’s Academic Standards Code of practice states that a 20-credit module is expected to require a total of 200 hours’ work.

The lectures will provide you with the broad issues related to the topics we cover in the course but the vast majority of your learning will be through independent, self-directed reading in preparation for the tutorials. The module guide has a list of two essential readings relevant to the issues to be discussed each week. The first piece of essential reading is usually an introductory pice that assumes no prior knowledge. The second reading will be more advanced. Do your best to read both! You must arrive at the tutorials prepared for discussion.The readings werent availableis not a valid excuse for non-preparation.

You all have the relevant library password and you should be familiar with the John Rylands University Library’s Electronic Resources by now. Most of the journal articles listed in subsequent pages can be downloaded free of charge and read off-screen or printed. In addition, you can use several databases (for example, the IBSS database) to source your own reading material using various key word searches.

The majority of reading sources for this course are journal articles that have been key interventions in the relevant debates in IPE. The reading lists are by no means exhaustive and as 2nd year students your reading should be becoming increasingly self-directed and wide. Roam the library shelves and browse data bases for further books and articles. Be aware, in addition, that the course topic owes much to the academic endeavour of many disciplines, and consequently useful sources may be found in a range of other disciplines such as sociology, economic history, economics, geography, political economy, and international law.


Assessment:

Assessment for this course is by means of one essay of 2500 words, one 2 hour exam, and a reflexive tutorial learning portfolio. The breakdown of marks is as follows:

  • Essay 60%

  • Exam 25%

  • Portfolio 15%

The essay hand in date: 14.00 on Monday 5th December 2011

The portfolio hand in date: 14.00 on Monday 12th December 2011


Preparation of the Assessed Essay:

You will be expected to show an understanding of the background material provided in the relevant lecture for your chosen topic, the accompanying tutorial, and the course guide. The essay must demonstrate that you have attempted to research relevant material on your own beyond just what we have provided in lectures and tutorials. The word length, excluding references and bibliography but including any explanatory footnotes and any appendices, must be stated on the first page. The target length is 2,500 words, and in no circumstances may you fall below 2,300 words or go above 2,700. Assessed essays must be one and a half or double-spaced, with a one-inch margin, and with all pages clearly numbered. The lack of a proper bibliography and appropriate references will be penalised by the deduction of marks. Please refer to the Part Two Guide available through the Politics student intranet. Your assessed essay in POLI20511 should entail no substantial overlap with an assessed essay in another course, or with an extended essay project (if you are doing one this session).

  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   77

Похожие:

Please note that these outlines are for 2011-12. The timetabling and course content for these course units may change in 2012-13 iconThe information contained in these course outlines is correct at the time of publication, but may be subject to change as part of the Department’s policy of

Please note that these outlines are for 2011-12. The timetabling and course content for these course units may change in 2012-13 iconThe information contained in these course outlines is correct at the time of publication, but may be subject to change as part of the Department’s policy of

Please note that these outlines are for 2011-12. The timetabling and course content for these course units may change in 2012-13 iconNote: Anyone receiving this who does not want it should click on the automatic “Change address / Leave mailing list” tab at the bottom of this message

Please note that these outlines are for 2011-12. The timetabling and course content for these course units may change in 2012-13 iconNote added by jpl webmaster: This document was prepared by lpi. The content has not been approved or adopted by, nasa, jpl, or the California Institute of

Please note that these outlines are for 2011-12. The timetabling and course content for these course units may change in 2012-13 iconNote for Philip: Each section of the content is preceded by the columned table, copied over from your original document. The main body text for each section is outside of the table

Please note that these outlines are for 2011-12. The timetabling and course content for these course units may change in 2012-13 icon"If liberals had to change their name to progressives and resort to political correctness in order to change their image, you know something isn't right."

Please note that these outlines are for 2011-12. The timetabling and course content for these course units may change in 2012-13 iconClimate change after tropical deforestation: seasonal variability of surface albedo and its effects on precipitation change

Please note that these outlines are for 2011-12. The timetabling and course content for these course units may change in 2012-13 iconPlease note that the list of publications for 2012 will only be completed early 2013

Please note that these outlines are for 2011-12. The timetabling and course content for these course units may change in 2012-13 iconBan puts Onus on U. S. for Climate Change Talks `Breakthrough' (Bloomberg) The U. N.'s Hot Air on Climate Change (Time)

Please note that these outlines are for 2011-12. The timetabling and course content for these course units may change in 2012-13 iconIn this paper I will characterize land cover change and, address types of land use change and discuss the impacts that they have on climate. While there are a

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница