Descendants of Morris/Maurice Langdeau




НазваниеDescendants of Morris/Maurice Langdeau
страница5/55
Дата27.09.2012
Размер2.54 Mb.
ТипДокументы
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   55

8. EMILY A.2 LANGDEAU (MORRIS/MAURICE1)365,366,367 was born May 06, 1866 in Rulo, Richardson County, Nebraska368,369,370, and died Aft. 1930. She married LOUIS PIERRE GIROUX371 April 30, 1883 in South Dakota372,373,374. He was born September 16, 1852 in Nebraska375,376,377, and died August 07, 1941 in Todd County, South Dakota.


Notes for EMILY A. LANGDEAU:

The 1880 Census lists her as Emma.


The 1900 Census lists her as mother of 7 children, 3 still living. The 1910 Census lists her as mother of 8 children, 5 still living.


More About EMILY A. LANGDEAU:

Date born 2: 1862, Iowa377

Date born 3: 1864, Nebraska378

Date born 4: 1864, South Dakota379

Date born 5: July 20, 1867, Nebraska

Date born 6: 1868, Rulo, Richardson County, Nebraska

Allotment: 1896379

Baptism: September 10, 1867380

Census: 1870, Township 2, Range 17, Richardson County, Nebraska, page 7

Census 2: 1880, Charles Mix County, Dakota Territory, page 234

Census 3: 1900, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Meyer County, South Dakota, page 219B

Census 4: 1910, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Mellette County, South Dakota, page 1A

Census 5: 1920, Township 43, Range 30, Mellette County, South Dakota, page 1A

Census 6: 1930, Roundup Township, Mellette County, South Dakota, page 1B

Tribe: Half Blood Sioux381

Tribe 2: Mixed Blood, Rosebud Sioux382


Notes for LOUIS PIERRE GIROUX:

The 1910 Census lists him as Lewis P. Jiroux.


More About LOUIS PIERRE GIROUX:

Date born 2: 1854, South Dakota383

Allotment: 1896383

Census: 1900, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Meyer County, South Dakota, page 219A

Census 2: 1910, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Mellette County, South Dakota, page 1A

Census 3: 1920, Township 43, Range 30, Mellette County, South Dakota, page 1A

Census 4: 1930, Roundup Township, Mellette County, South Dakota, page 1B

Occupation: 1900, Stock Raising384

Occupation 2: 1910, Ranch Owner385

Occupation 3: 1920, Farm Manager386

Son of: Louis Giroux and Marie Beauvais

Tribe: Half Blood Sioux387

Tribe 2: Mixed Blood, Rosebud Sioux388

Tribe 3: 1/4 Teton Sioux389

Value of Home: 1930, $300390


More About LOUIS GIROUX and EMILY LANGDEAU:

Marriage 1: April 30, 1883, South Dakota391,392,393

Marriage 2: 1882394

Children of EMILY LANGDEAU and LOUIS GIROUX are:

i. CHARLOTTE3 GIROUX, b. July 1884, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Mellette County, South Dakota395; d. Aft. 1901; m. UNKNOWN JONES.


Notes for CHARLOTTE GIROUX:

The 1900 Census lists her as 1/2 Sioux.


More About CHARLOTTE GIROUX:

Census: 1900, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Meyer County, South Dakota, page 219B


37. ii. MABEL CLAIRE GIROUX, b. April 1889, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Mellette County, South Dakota; d. September 30, 1976, Duarte, Los Angeles County, California.

38. iii. VERN CLYDE "VERNIE" GIROUX, b. August 11, 1894, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Mellette County, South Dakota; d. December 26, 1979, Mission, Todd County, South Dakota.

iv. RALPH SAMUEL GIROUX, b. April 06, 1896, Rosebud, Todd County, South Dakota396,397; d. Aft. 1930; m. IRENE, 1926397; b. 1906, California397; d. Aft. 1930.


Notes for RALPH SAMUEL GIROUX:

Ralph served in World War I. The 1900 Census lists him as 1/2 Sioux. His Draft Registration Card lists him as tall and stout, with brown eyes and black hair. The 1910 Census lists him as 1/4 Teton Sioux.


More About RALPH SAMUEL GIROUX:

Date born 2: 1895, South Dakota398

Date born 3: 1897, South Dakota399

Date born 4: April 08, 1898, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Mellette County, South Dakota400

Census: 1900, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Meyer County, South Dakota, page 20A

Census 2: 1920, Township 43, Range 30, Mellette County, South Dakota, page 1A

Census 3: 1930, Roundup Township, Mellette County, South Dakota, page 1B

Draft Registration: June 05, 1917, White River, Mellette County, South Dakota401

Occupation: Bet. June 05, 1917 - 1930, Farmer, self employed401,402

Occupation 2: 1920, Farm Laborer403

Tribe: Mixed-Blood Rosebud Sioux404


More About IRENE:

Census: 1930, Roundup Township, Mellette County, South Dakota, page 1B


More About RALPH GIROUX and IRENE:

Marriage: 1926404


v. ROY GIROUX, b. September 06, 1900, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Mellette County, South Dakota405; d. December 1970, Mission, Todd County, South Dakota405.


More About ROY GIROUX:

Soc. Sec. Card Issued: Bef. 1951, South Dakota405

Social Security Number: 503-12-2231405


vi. JOSEPH GIROUX, b. 1900, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Mellette County, South Dakota406,407; d. April 20, 1924, Mellette County, South Dakota.


Notes for JOSEPH GIROUX:

The 1910 Census lists him as 1/4 Teton Sioux.


More About JOSEPH GIROUX:

Census: 1910, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Mellette County, South Dakota, page 1A

Census 2: 1920, Township 43, Range 30, Mellette County, South Dakota, page 1A


vii. KEITH C. (ADOPTED) GIROUX, b. 1910, South Dakota408; d. Aft. 1920.


More About KEITH C. (ADOPTED) GIROUX:

Census: 1920, Township 43, Range 30, Mellette County, South Dakota, page 1A


9. ARMINE2 LANGDEAU (MORRIS/MAURICE1)409,410,411 was born December 12, 1870 in Rulo, Richardson County, Nebraska412,413, and died March 24, 1940 in Bonesteel, Gregory County, South Dakota414,415. She married BENJAMIN FRANKLIN TURGEON415,416,417 1885 in Wheeler, Charles Mix County, South Dakota418,419,420. He was born December 14, 1867 in Beaumont, Bellechasse County, Quebec, Canada421,422,423,424, and died July 12, 1926 in Bonesteel, Gregory County, South Dakota425.


Notes for ARMINE LANGDEAU:

The 1880 Census lists her as Armina. The 1900 Census lists her as mother of 4 children, 3 still living. The 1910 Census lists her as mother of 4 children, 3 still living. The 1920 Census lists her as an Alien.


More About ARMINE LANGDEAU:

Date born 2: December 12, 1871, Rulo, Richardson County, Nebraska

Date born 3: 1872, Nebraska426

Date born 4: 1872, South Dakota427

Date born 5: December 1872, Nebraska428

Date born 6: December 12, 1873, Rulo, Richardson County, Nebraska429

Date born 7: 1874, Nebraska430

Baptism: January 18, 1874431

Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Bonesteel, Gregory County, South Dakota

Census: 1880, Charles Mix County, Dakota Territory, page 234

Census 2: 1900, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Meyer County, South Dakota, page 19A

Census 3: 1910, Turgeon Precinct, Gregory County, South Dakota, page 16B

Census 4: 1920, Pleasant Valley Township, Gregory County, South Dakota, page 6A

Census 5: 1930, Bonesteel, Gregory County, South Dakota, page 2B

Land Patent: July 01, 1901, Gregory County, South Dakota, 80 acres432

Land Patent 2: December 29, 1917, Gregory County, South Dakota, 39.1 acres432

Land Patent 3: December 29, 1917, Gregory County, South Dakota, 39.06 acres433

Land Patent 4: December 29, 1917, Gregory County, South Dakota, 160 acres433

Land Patent 5: December 29, 1917, Gregory County, South Dakota, 320 acres434

Residence: 1920, First Avenue North, Bonesteel, Gregory County, South Dakota435

Tribe: Half Blood Sioux436

Value of Home: 1930, $4000437


Notes for BENJAMIN FRANKLIN TURGEON:

From "The Saga of Sully Flats," by Adeline S. Gnirk, published 1977, by the Gregory Times-Advocate, Gregory, SD, page 320-322.


Benjamin Turgeon was born December 14, 1867 in Bellechasse County, Province of Quebec, Canada, to Casare and Jane (Tracy) Turgeon. Casare Turgeon was of French descent and Jane Tracy had immigrated to Canada from London, England. They were the parents of six sons: Abraham, Louis, Phillip, Ludger, Onesenme and Benjamin, and three daughters Laida (Turgeon), Oralee Culet and Auror Labracque. Benjamin was an intelligent, able, versatile and self-sufficient man. He had scarcely and eighth grade education but he was far ahead of his time. He became a rancher and a leader in the Whetstone Valley later to be named Turgeon Twp. He served as Gregory County Commissioner for four years.

Benjamin Turgeon journeyed to Dakota Territory from Canada about 1880, to the trading post of Wheeler in Charles Mix County. Benjamin, the youngest of the family, accompanied his brothers Ludger and Onesenme who joined their older brothers Abraham, Louis and Phillip. Abraham was the manager of the U. S. Government freight lines which ran from the Agency of White Swan, near Yankton, to Fort Laramie, Wyoming. Ludger, Phillip and Benjamin freighted from Yankton, Wheeler, to Deadwood for the gold miners in the Black Hills, when this area was Dakota Territory and an Indian Reservation. Their large heavy Conestaga wagon trains were pulled by slow, ponderous but hardy oxen.

Benjamin Turgeon met pretty young Armine at Rulo, Nebraska and they were wed in 1885. Armine was only fifteen years of age, the youngest of the Landeaux family and Benjamin, eighteen years old, was the youngest of the Turgeon family.

In 1887 Benjamin and Armine Turgeon moved to her allotment on the Whetstone, the S 1/2 of Section 25, later named Turgeon Twp. Their children, Francis and Louise were given their allotments in 1890-1894. Agnes, born in 1887, died of typhoid fever eleven years later. Julia was born in 1896. By the year 1909, Benjamin had purchased the N 1/2 of Section 35, also land in Sections 23, 24, 25, and 26 from discouraged homesteaders who sold our and left the country.

Benjamin and Armine's first home was a log cabin on the east bank of the Whetstone Creek, east of the present home. Francis and Louise were born in this log cabin. When the new home was erected, the log cabin became a bunk house. The Whetstone Creek, on the western side of the cabin, ran north, wound to the west and turned south before straightening its course west. It was in this flat nest that Benjamin built his home and farm buildings. Zachary Trahan from Canada, brother of Artemese Rang Desjarlais, lived with them, as well as other senior men who helped Benjamin with his many projects. They were furnished room and board, clothing and Horse Shoe Tobacco.

Benjamin with the help of these hired hands, built his barns and corrals. The barn was a huge two story building poured with a cement floor one foot in depth with a ladder to ascend the hay mow. With a capacity of 90 to 100 cows it took the men all day to feed the cattle in the winter. They pulled the hay to the barn in bobsleds. Employing his own sawmill, cottonwood logs were sawed into planks for feed bunks, mangers, stalls and corral fences and gates. A cattle shoot and weight scale was built northeast of the barn. A sling carried the load of hay into the mow. Four saddles were hung on the walls. A workshop and bunkhouse was staged in the hay mow after the barn's completion.

Benjamin owned and raised over 1,000 head of cattle and many horses that grazed on the lush grass of the fenceless Whetstone hills and Sully Flats. Cowboys, and later Francis and Louise, herded the stock and special care was exercised during calving time. In the fall the cowboys gathered the cattle from the prairies and river hills for a big round-up at the Turgeon ranch. Noah Williams, Frank Bishop, James and Henry Emery, Russell and Thomas Durfee, Jack Sully, the Hams, George Pete and many other ranchers drove their herds to the Turgeon corrals to be branded, earmarked, castrated and sorted. The ear marks cut out of the ears of the calves were put in individual piles for each rancher to count later. Louise kept the fire hot for the branding irons. Round-up time lasted many days until all was done and the herds moved out again to the ranges. Ed Pete drove the chuck wagon and Louise and her mother baked many large loaves of bread for the hungry cow punchers.

The family had been living in the log cabin, but in 1905-06 a new, big three-story house was erected west of the log cabin and south of the corrals. The house was built of large dimension cottonwood lumber, logs cut and sawed in the sawmill by Benjamin and his men. It was built upon a five foot mortar and rock foundation. The exterior was then sheeted with brick embossed tin, and the windows were shuttered. The third story bedroom was for visiting children. The main floor had two bedrooms, a clothes closet, a large hallway, parlor and dining room. A piano and a "Regina" music box graced the parlor. Louise and Julia occupied one bedroom. The larger bedroom was for company, but was also used for Mass and Communion by the priest of St. Francis Mission, accommodating the Catholics of the valley.

The basement, the main living quarters, consisted of two bedrooms, dining and living area, and kitchen. Ben and Armine slept in one bedroom, Francis and hired man slept in the other room. An open stairway in the middle of the room led to the first floor; under the stairs was a large oak closet. A nine foot cedar post stanchion equipped with jack rested on the basement floor, convenient to shift the weight of the house occasionally. A cement bathroom under the porch was supplied with running water. A heavy oak door in the rear opened into the basement. A Delco plant provided electricity to the house for lights and water. The children kept the wood box filled for the cookstove and wood or coal heaters. During the very cold nights the hired man kept all the stoves burning.

Oak trees from the creek were cut and sawed into board lengths, planed, sanded and fitted for the door, windows, mp board trim and floors by Benjamin. The house was finished on a Sunday, whereupon a carpenter bee was held. It was much enlivened by a keg of beer bought to help celebrate the completion of the house. It was a great house and the family loved their home.

The yard was landscaped with cedars dug from the Whetstone; today reach heights of 100 and 150 feet. Louise dug and planted with a butcher knife a small cedar seedling between the house and the outhouse - it required years to attain 25 feet. The tree still waves in the breeze, but the outhouse long ago was replaced by modern plumbing.

A huge garden was planted in the valley east of the new house. It was cultivated by a horse-drawn cultivator by some hoeing was required. Apple, cherry and plum seedlings were planted southeast of the log cabin, protected by the native trees of the Whetstone. Benjamin owned the first Avery tractor, 1913 model which pulled a five bottom plow, to which was attached a two-section drag to break the prairie sod.

A well drilling outfit was purchased to dig an artesian well in the barnyard lot. It flowed into an oval cement tank surrounded by a cement platform. A water wheel to operate the Delco plant was located in the Whetstone Creek below the artesian overflow. This did not generate sufficient power so a shed was built to house the Delco plant, two water wheel and supply tank. Artesian water was piped to the house for bathing, but a cistern of rainwater near the house was used for drinking, cooking and laundry. The soft water was piped to the kitchen sink hand pump. Benjamin dug 10 - 15 artesian wells in the area, also digging a well for the St. Francis Church and school at Mission, S.D.

Benjamin owned and raced blooded horses. One favorite, "Whiskey Pete", won many silver cups and silver toothpicks as well as crystal ware, centerpieces and condiment sets. One crystal wine glass dated "Whetstone July 24, 1899" was won by Whiskey Pete. Whiskey Pete was a long-legged bay with a white star marking his forehead. He raced in Butte and Omaha, Nebraska and Sioux City, Iowa. Pacer horses were sold to the Omaha Stockyards as "cutting out" horses. These fine horses were pictured on calendars and mailed to cattle buyers and producers.

Benjamin invented and patented a spring tire. The tires rode easy in the hills but the springs would not stay intact. He was also a mechanic and became adept at hot iron welding, new to this area. Employing hot iron welding he invented the first cattle guards or "auto gates" which eliminated the use of gates to enter the ranch. The gate was designed with poles and old artesian rods. A small gate to the side accommodated the riding horses. He fashioned horseshoes in his shop and shod horses for the neighbors. It their watch or clock was not keeping time, he could repair, oil and clean the timepieces.

Roads to the ranch in the winters were maintained by the Turgeons. Using horses and a scoop they cleared the roads to accommodate all vehicles, including his new Franklin auto. He was also a Franklin auto dealer for interested buyers in the area.

A super salesman convinced Benjamin to buy shares in an oil venture in Wichita Falls, Texas. Benjamin became wealthy when "black gold" shot skyward from his wells. He traveled to Texas several times a year to check his investments. On a return trip from Texas, the family stopped at Omaha. Louise purchased a $25 pair of tan, 18-button hightop shoes from the Brandeis Store. The clerks stared in amazement when she paid the shoe clerk with a $100 bill given to her by her father, but of course the change was returned to him.

Friends, relatives or neighbors often fished or seined on the big lake-pond near the farm buildings. Uncle William Emery loved to spiel tall tales to the children especially about the large amount of money he had salted away in a barrel, these tales delighted the children.

Benjamin and Armine had labored long and diligently, the time was near to retire. In 1918 he sold the ranch and 1/2 interest in the cattle to Fred Harris, Benjamin's former hired hand. Later it was transferred to Otto Nightingale. It again changed hands, becoming the property of a Texas cattle company, with foreman Robert Taylor.

The Turgeon home which had seen so much living was demolished. It was pushed into the basement, covered over and planted with grass. A new modern home was erected. The barn was considerably reduced in size. However, some of the original barn interior, stalls, mangers, corrals, scales and artesian well are still in use.

Benjamin and Armine Turgeon retired to Bonesteel, S.D. Benjamin Turgeon died July 12, 1926 and Armine Landeaux Turgeon died March 24, 1940 at Bonesteel. They were the parents of four children: Agnes 1886-1897; Francis (1890) married Nettie Davis, children Dolor, Richard, Ray, Laura, Frances, Loretta, Donald and Jerry; Louise (1893) married Henry Lunn, (dec.), children Helen, Marie, Dorothy and Henrietta; Julia (1896) married Richard Gravel, children Garneta, Rex and Janice.

____________________________________________________________________


The 1920 Federal Census of Pleasant Valley, Gregory County, South Dakota, page 6A, lists him as age 52, born in Canada, mother tongue: French, race: white, emigrated to the U.S. in 1882, naturalized in 1886, father and mother both French Canadian, occupation: automobile salesman.


More About BENJAMIN FRANKLIN TURGEON:

Date born 2: February 1866, Beaumont, Bellechasse County, Quebec, Canada438

Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Bonesteel, Gregory County, South Dakota

Census: 1900, Rosebud Indian Reservation, Meyer County, South Dakota, page 19A

Census 2: 1910, Turgeon Precinct, Gregory County, South Dakota, page 16B

Census 3: 1920, Pleasant Valley Township, Gregory County, South Dakota, page 6A

Immigration: 1880, from Canada439

Immigration 2: 1882, from Canada440

Land Patent: January 13, 1910, Gregory County, South Dakota, 160 Acres441

Land Patent 2: January 13, 1910, Gregory County, South Dakota, 160 Acres442

Land Patent 3: January 13, 1910, Gregory County, South Dakota, 160 Acres443

Land Patent 4: January 13, 1910, Gregory County, South Dakota, 160 Acres444

Naturalization: 1886445

Occupation: 1900, Stock Raiser446

Occupation 2: 1910, Farmer447

Occupation 3: 1920, Automobile Salesman448

Residence: 1920, First Avenue North, Bonesteel, Gregory County, South Dakota449

Son of: Cezaire Turgeon and Jeanne Marie Trachy


More About BENJAMIN TURGEON and ARMINE LANGDEAU:

Marriage: 1885, Wheeler, Charles Mix County, South Dakota450,451,452

Children of ARMINE LANGDEAU and BENJAMIN TURGEON are:

i. AGNES3 TURGEON453,454, b. 1886, Turgeon Township, Gregory County, South Dakota455,456; d. Aft. 1910.


More About AGNES TURGEON:

Died 2: 1897, Bonesteel, Gregory County, South Dakota457

Census: 1910, Turgeon Precinct, Gregory County, South Dakota, page 16B


39. ii. FRANCIS TURGEON, b. June 29, 1890, Bonesteel, Gregory County, South Dakota; d. Aft. 1930.

40. iii. MARY LOUISE TURGEON, b. October 07, 1893, Bonesteel, Gregory County, South Dakota; d. August 17, 1976, Burke, Gregory County, South Dakota.

41. iv. JULIA ARMINE TURGEON, b. September 06, 1895, Wheeler, Charles Mix County, South Dakota; d. Aft. 1930.


Generation No. 3

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   55

Похожие:

Descendants of Morris/Maurice Langdeau iconKelly, J. M. (John Maurice)

Descendants of Morris/Maurice Langdeau iconVincent Morris Croggon

Descendants of Morris/Maurice Langdeau iconDescendants of Robert New

Descendants of Morris/Maurice Langdeau iconLiterature Review Nina Morris

Descendants of Morris/Maurice Langdeau iconDescendants of John Hawkins

Descendants of Morris/Maurice Langdeau iconDescendants of Josiah Coleman

Descendants of Morris/Maurice Langdeau iconDescendants of Christopher Lowndes

Descendants of Morris/Maurice Langdeau iconDescendants of Wojciech Brzezinski

Descendants of Morris/Maurice Langdeau iconDescendants of Gilbert Clark

Descendants of Morris/Maurice Langdeau iconDescendants of Benjamin B. Clark

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница