A comprehensive wine information guide in a program to manage your home cellar




НазваниеA comprehensive wine information guide in a program to manage your home cellar
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User Field 9 - Enter anything you want here.

You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the PreferencesSetupPreferences popup.


User Field 10 - Enter anything you want here.

You can name this field on the Cellar Display Preferences page of the PreferencesSetupPreferences popup.


User Notes 1 - a free form field for entering any notes you may wish to take. We have provided wine tasting notes of a recent vintage where available from the winemaker or winery in the Winemaker Notes field. You may create your own tasting notes for wines in your cellar. The default templates for the User Notes fields are created on the User Fields tab of the Preferences popup.


User Notes 2 - a free form field for entering any notes you may wish to take.


Value Guide - a calculated value based on the most recently reported cellar door price for the current vintage. Earlier vintage prices are computed based on the individual vintage rating, years improvement in the bottle (or degradation if they have passed their peak) etc, etc. Remember, the values given are a guide only. They are meant to serve you as an indication to you of the current worth of each wine - not as an investment, but to drink. For instance, early vintages of Grange will fetch very high prices at auction for their collection value, despite the fact that as a wine for drinking, they should have been consumed well before the present time. Once entered in your cellar, the value is automatically computed each year to reflect inflation, improvement or degradation as the wine in your cellar ages etc. You may find this useful for insurance purposes.


Variety - the variety or varieties of grapes used to make the wine.


Note:

Under the EC/Australia Bilateral Wine Agreement, which came into effect on 1 March 1994, Australia gained improved access to the EC market through the lowering of technical barriers to Australia's wines in return for the Australian wine industry phasing out its use of European geographical indications. The use of some names such as 'Hock' and 'White Bordeaux' is being phased out and further negotiations will be held to establish phase-out arrangements for European names in widespread use in Australia such as 'Chablis' and 'Champagne'.


The Australian industry will in future use varietal, regional and brand names to market its wines. There will also be a need to develop replacement names where protected EC names have entered into common use, such as 'Sherry'.


Vintage - is the year the grapes for the wine were picked. Enter the full year as in 1997.

If the wine is specifically Non Vintage containing a blend of wines from various years, leave the field blank.

In the wine reference section, where a blended wine uses a spread of defined vintages, the vintage given is the youngest vintage in the blend.


Winemaker Notes - We have provided notes about the wine style, or tasting notes of a recent vintage supplied by the respective winemaker or winery. You may create your own tasting notes for wines in your cellar in either of the User Notes fields.


Winery - is the name of the winery which made the wine. Where a winery has multiple brands, this field will usually be the brand name of the wine.


Winery Details - is a field which looks up the Uncorked Database for a matching winery, and displays contact details and other notes where available. You can modify these details for wines in your cellar


Many of the above fields are selectable for display or printing.

See also

How do I... Display different fields on the Cellar or Add Wine pageHowdoIDisplayDifferentFields

How do I... Print a reportHowdoIPrintaReport

Australian Wine Regions


The Australian Wine and Brandy Corporation's (AWBC) Geographical Indications Committee, established in 1993, is working with the industry to clearly define the winegrape growing regions of Australia. To implement commitments under the EC/Australia Wine Agreement, a Register of Protected Names has also been established to provide protection for the names and boundaries of Australian and EC geographical indications, to register traditional expressions for wine, as well as the winegrape varieties to be used in the manufacture of wine in Australia.


As of May 1998, the following is a list of the Australian Geographical Indications that have been determined and entered into part (a) of the Australian Register of Protected Names by the Geographic Indications Committee of Australian Wine and Brandy Corporation. Note that Geographic Indication relates to where the grape is grown, and not where the wine is made.


South Eastern Australia

NEW SOUTH WALES

Big Rivers

Murray Darling

Swan Hill

Central Ranges

Orange

Hunter Valley

Hunter

Broke Fordwich

Northern Rivers

Northern Slopes

South Coast

Southern New South Wales

Hilltops

Canberra District

Western Plains


VICTORIA

Central Victoria

Gippsland

North East Victoria

Rutherglen

North West Victoria

Murray Darling

Swan Hill

Mountain Country

Port Phillip

Geelong

Yarra Valley

Mornington Peninsula

Western Victoria

Grampians


SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Adelaide (Super Zone, above Mount Lofty Ranges, Fleurieu and Barossa)

Mount Lofty Ranges

Adelaide Hills

Fleurieu

McLaren Vale

Limestone Coast

Mount Benson

The Peninsulas

Lower Murray

Far North

Barossa

Barossa Valley

Eden Valley


WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Eastern Plains, Inland and North of Western Australia

West Australian South East Coastal

South West Australia

Margaret River

Great Southern

Mount Barker

Central Western Australia

Greater Perth


QUEENSLAND

TASMANIA

AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY

NORTHERN TERRITORY

Note:

I. The regions "Murray Darling" and "Swan Hill" are contained within the zones of "Big Rivers" (145W) and "North West Victoria" (VIC), whilst all other regions are contained within single zones.

2. The zone "South Eastern Australia" incorporates the whole of the states of New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania and part only of the states of Queensland and South Australia.


You will note that many of Australia's traditional wine regions are not yet entered into the Register of Protected Names. In some instances the Geographical Indications Committee is awaiting receipt of an application whilst in others the application is being processed.


* Acknowledgment is given to the Registrar of Protected Names for the above information.


Wine Judging


In show wine tasting contests, a wine is judged in 10 categories, points awarded for each category, then totaled for a total number of points for the wine. A wine scoring 17-20 is regarded as fine wine of outstanding quality, 13-16 is a sound wine, 9-12 is a commercially viable wine but with noticeable defect, while 8 or below is regarded as poor to unsatisfactory.


The categories used to judge wines are as follows

Appearance - 0=cloudy, 1=clear, 2=brilliant

Color - 0=distinctly off, 1=slightly off, 2=correct

Aroma - 0=vinous (basic wine), 1=distinct but not varietal,3=varietal

Bouquet - Subtract 1 or 2 for off odours, add 1 for bottle bouquet

Vinegary - 0=obvious, 1=slight, 2=none

Total Acidity - 0=distinctly high or low, 1=slightly high or low, 2=normal, well balanced

Sweetness - 0=too high or low, 1=normal

Body - 0=too high or low, 1=normal

Flavour - 0=distinctly abnormal, 1=slightly abnormal, 2=normal

Bitterness - 0=distinctly High, 1=slightly high, 2=normal

General Quality - 0=lacking, 1=slight, 2=impressive


Note - The above is not to be confused with the reference merit value which is used in this program. (see Information about a wineInformationaboutawine)


Glossary of Wine Terms - A -


AA - BB - CC - DD - EE - FF - GG - HH - IJ - JJ - KJ - LJ - MM - NN - OO - PP - QQ - RR - SS - TT - UU - VU - WW - XW - YW - ZW


Acetic Acid - All wines contain (normally quite small amounts of) acetic acid or vinegar, not noticeable to taste or smell. At higher levels - over 0.1% - this flavour can dominate, and flaw the wine.


Acid - An integral part of every wine, the level of acid will appear to decline as the wine ages.


Acidic - When the acid component of a wine is so obvious as to be a major component of the end product.


Acrid - A harsh or bitter taste or pungent smell which is due to too much sulfur.


Aeration - Letting a wine breath oxygenated air by decanting or swirling in the glass. This can be very helpful for young wines. Too much can also be very harmful to older mature wines.


Aftertaste - The flavour that lingers in your mouth after tasting or swallowing. It can be either pleasant or unpleasant- or non-existent, which would indicate a neutral-flavoured wine. Harsh or unpleasant aftertaste might indicate the presence of excessive acidity or tannin in the wine.


Aging Sur Lie - Translated "aging on the lees", and often referred to as "yeast contact". Wine is aged in the barrel with the yeast retained, rather than being clarified before aging. Aging on the lees increases the complexity and creaminess of the wine.


Aggressive - A harsh component of a wine, usually due to high tannin or acid levels.


Albarino - A premium white wine grape grown in the Galicia region of Spain. Albarino wines are crisp, refreshing and light bodied.


Alcohol - The difference between grape juice and wine! Alcohol is produced by fermentation, and in this context means ethyl alcohol (C2H50H) produced by the action of yeasts on grape sugars during the fermentation. Wines are usually in the 12.5% to 14% range with some going as high as 17%.


Aleatico - A red member of the Muscat family of grapes and a popular variety in Italy


Alicante Bouschet - A unique grape variety that that actually possesses red flesh. Developed in France in the late 1880's by Henri Bouschet.


Aligote - Burgundian white-wine grape. Usually a medium-bodied, crisp, dry wine with spicy character.


Alsace - Northeastern province of France, bordering the Rhine, known for it's rich dry white wines, primarily Riesling and Gewurztraminer.


Amarone - A powerful, hearty dry red wine from Italy's Veneto region, made from a blend of partially dried red grapes.


American Oak - In contrast to the more expensive French Oak. American Oak is marked by strong vanilla, dill and cedar flavors. It is commonly used for aging Cabernet, Merlot, and Zinfandel, for which it is the preferred oak. It's less desirable, although still used for Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.


American Viticultural Area (AVA) - A delimited, geographical (USA) grape-growing area that has officially been given appellation status by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.


Amontillado - A dry, rather full-bodied style of Sherry from Spain.


Ampelography - The study of grape varieties.


Angular - Dominant, tart edged flavors and tastes in many young, dry wines.


Anthocyans - Natural organic chemical compounds responsible for the red, blue and purple colors of grapes and wine. Incude anthocyanins, anthocyanidins and pro-anthocyanidins.


AOC - Short for Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (sometimes Appellation Contrôlée abbreviated as AC). Translates literally to protected place name, and is the official French category for higher-ranking wines. AOC wines are categorized according to name, origin, grape varieties and other legal definitions.


Aperitif - (French) Describes an alcoholic beverage served before dinner to stimulate appetite.


Appearance - Refers to a wine's clarity, not color.


Appellation - Defines the area where a wine's grapes were grown, such as Barossa Valley or Yarra Valley. (see also Region)


Appellation D'Origine Controlee(AOC) - The French system of appellations. To use an appellation in this system, a wine must follow rules describing the area the grapes are grown in, the varieties used, the ripeness, the alcoholic strength, the vineyard yields and the methods used in growing the grapes and making the wine.


Arneis - A white wine grape grown in the Piedmont area of Italy.


Aroma - The scent or smell of the grape variety; usually meaning pleasing smells, rather than off odours.


Aromatic - Used to refer to a wine, particularly white wines, with intensely floral or fruity aromas, such as Muscat or Viognier.


Ascescence - Term used to mark the presence of acetic acid and ethyl acetate.


Asti Spumante - A semidry sparkling wine produced from the Moscato di Canelli grape in the village of Asti, in Piedmont, Italy.


Astringent - Tannins produce astringent tastes in wine. You can detect astringency by the involuntary 'puckering' of your mouth as the tannins hit your tastebuds. Tannins come from grape-skins, seeds and oak.


Attack - In wine tasting, the first impression of a wine on the mouth. Usually perceived as a first "hit" on the tip of the tongue and at the front of mouth.


Auslese - Designated quality level for a German white wine made from very ripe grape bunches picked out for their sweetness.


Austere - Means different things to different palates, though generally meant to indicate a wine that has vinous characters without strong recognisable varietal fruit or oak influence.


AVA - Acronym for American Viticultural Area, indicating wine-growing regions as defined through geographic and climatic boundaries by the Federal Government.. Theoretically, the American version of the French AOC system.


Awkard - Used to describe a wine that is out of balance.


Glossary of Wine Terms - B -


AA - BB - CC - DD - EE - FF - GG - HH - IJ - JJ - KJ - LJ - MM - NN - OO - PP - QQ - RR - SS - TT - UU - VU - WW - XW - YW - ZW


Backbone - Used to denote those wines that are full-bodied, well-structured and balanced by a desirable level of acidity.


Backward - Used to describe a young wine that is less developed than others of its type and class from the same vintage.


Balance - A good wine will have a pleasant balance of flavours, acid and tannin to create a smooth impression on the palate. Some wines will need to be aged before all their elements are in harmony.

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