Senate concurrent resolution 19




НазваниеSenate concurrent resolution 19
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APPENDIX A


SENATE CONCURRENT RESOLUTION 19


APPENDIX B


CONTACT LIST

Leaf Blower Report Contact List


Name

Representing

Phone number

E-mail address

Jack Allen

Zero Air Pollution or Coalition to Ban Leafblowers

310/454-2062

jackjack@linkline.com

Adrian Alvarez

Association of Latin American Gardeners of Los Angeles

213/538-7296

pipila@earthlink.net

Barbara Alvarez

Golden State Landscaping, Inc. or California Landscape Contractor's Association

626/917-1614




Mike Alvarez

Cal/OSHA Consultation, External Education & Training

916/574-2528




Tony Ashby

Sierra Research

916/444-6666

Hashby@SierraResearch.com

Glenn Barr

Aide to Los Angeles City Councilwoman Cindy Miscikowski

213/485-3811




Bob Barrish

Cal/OSHA Consultation

415/703-5270




Matthew Blodgett

Self, Zero Air Pollution

310/454-2945 (fax)




Nicholas Blonder

Self, resident of Mill Valley, CA

none




Arline Bronzaft, PhD.

Self, League for the Hard of Hearing

212/288-7532

Albtor@aol.com

David Coel

SCAQMD

909/396-3143




James Cone

Department of Health Services, Occupational Health Branch

510/622-4319




Chatham Cowherd

Midwest Research Institute







Vernita Davidson

Cal/OSHA, Information Management Unit

415/703-5116




Don DeYoung

City of Carmichael, Parks Department







Mac Dunaway

Portable Power Equipment Manufacturers Association (PPEMA)

202/862-9700

duncross@msn.com

Dennis Earhardt

California Department of Industrial Relations, Division of Workers' Compensation

818/901-5030




Margaret Easton

California Department of Industrial Relations, Division of Workers' Compensation

213/576-7422




Dennis Fitz

University of California, Riverside; CE-CERT

909/781-5781




John Froines, PhD

University of California, Los Angeles

310/206-6141




Joan Graves

Zero Air Pollution

310/454-1069




William M. Guerry, Jr.

Outdoor Power Equipment Institute

202/342-8858

wguerry@colshan.com

Kim Hagadone

Department of Health Services, Occupational Health Branch

510/622-4234




Lee Hager

James, Anderson and Associates, Inc

517/349-8066

Lee_Hager@compuserve.com

Matthew F. Hall

Portable Power Equipment Manufacturers Association (PPEMA)

202/862-9700

mfhall@email.com

Bob Hayes

Cal/OSHA

415/703-5174




Henry Hogo

SCAQMD

909/396-3184

hhogo@aqmd.gov

Karen Hutchinson

PPEMA

301/652-0774




LeiLani Johnson

Los Angles Department of Water & Power

213/367-4690

ljohns@dwp.ci.la.ca.us

Lynne Johnson

City of Palo Alto, Asst. Chief of Police

650/329-2115




Julie Kelts

Citizens for a Quieter Sacramento

916/454-5173

jvkelts@ns.net; http://www.nonoise.org/quietnet/cqs/cqs.htm

Steven Kramer, PhD

San Diego State University, Communications Disorders Department

619/594-6140




Michael Laybourn

SCAQMD

909/396-3066




Susan Leong

Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA)

916/327-3015




John Liskey

OPEI

703/549-7600

opeistat@aol.com

Michael Lipsett

OEHHA

510/622-3153




Jack McGurk

California Department of Health Services

916/445-0498




James McNew

Husqvarna

704/597-5000




Gregory Muleski

Midwest Research Institute

816/753-7600




Douglas Nakamura

Northwest Landscape

408/298-4720




Jerry Nakano

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

213/894-8000X3009




Tony Nash

Sierra Research

916/444-6666




Robin Pendergrast

International Marketing Exchange, Inc.

815/363-0909

ime@imeinc.com

Margaret Petitjean

Self




mpetitjean@webtv.net

Barry Raybould

Self




BRaybould@aol.com

Mary Rippey

California Employment Development Department, Labor Market Information Division

916/262-2266




Larry Rolfuss

California Landscape Contractor's Association

916/448-2522




Larry Royster, PhD.

North Carolina State University




royster@eos.ncsu.edu

Ranjit (Ron) Sahu

OPEI, consultant

626/440-8931




Alex Schneider

City of Berkeley Environmental Health

510/665-6854




Lawrence Schulze, PhD.

University of Houston, Department of Industrial Engineering

713/743-4196

LJHS@uh.edu

Timothy Somheil

Appliance Magazine

630/990-3484

tim@appliance.com

Parke Terry

California Landscape Contractor's Association

916/442-1111




Jean Wasserman

Michigan Occupational Health Division

517/322-6052




Ed Weil

California Department of Justice, Deputy Attorney General

510/622-2149




Larry N. Will

Echo, Inc., Vice President, Engineering

847/540-8400X138

vpengecho@aol.com

Diane Wolfberg

Zero Air Pollution




wolfberg@iramp.com

Vasken Yardemian

SCAQMD

909/396-3296




Eric Zabon

Michigan, Occupational Health

517/322-1608




Thomas Zambrano

AeroVironment Inc.

626/357-9983X268

zambrano@aerovironment.com

Eric Zwerling

Rutgers Noise Technical Assistance Center

732/932-8065

Ezwerling@aol.com


APPENDIX C


AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS


APPENDIX D


CHEMICAL SPECIATION PROFILE


FOR PAVED ROAD DUST


APPENDIX E


PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SOUND


AND LOUDNESS MEASURES


Physical Properties of Sound


Sound is defined as vibrations in a medium, such as air or water, that stimulate the auditory nerve and produce the sensation of hearing. The vibrations propagate outward from the source of the sound in the form of pressure waves, traveling in straight lines in all directions outward from the source, as with the ripples in a pond resulting when one drops a rock into the water. Sound is a form of mechanical energy and is measured in energy-related units (WHO 1980).


The speed of sound depends on the properties of the medium through which the sound wave moves. Sound travels more rapidly through air than through water, but may travel more rapidly through a solid than through air (Sataloff & Sataloff 1993). Sound waves, however, do not transmit through a vacuum. At sea level and 68o F, the speed of sound through air is 770 miles per hour, or 344 meters per second. A sonic boom is heard when an object is traveling through air faster than the speed of sound, which creates an impulse of sound from the leading and trailing edges of the object (Kryter 1994).


Sounds are characterized by pitch, loudness, quality, and duration. Leaving aside duration, each of these is a psychological sensation, largely correlated to the physical attributes of frequency, intensity, and overtone structure, or timbre. Other physical factors, however, also influence the perception of sound. Sounds can be distorted by the wind, rendering them quieter or louder depending on the relative direction of the wind. Sound waves can bend around an obstacle, such as a wall, pass through the object unaffected, be reflected off the object, or be partially reflected and partially passed through or around the object. Two sound waves can also have the effect of canceling or amplifying each other at fixed distances from the source. Each of these behaviors depends on physical characteristics of the sound waves; frequency, amplitude, and wavelength; and physical characteristics of the environment (Sataloff & Sataloff 1993).


The sensation of pitch is related to the number of vibrations per second of a sound wave, which is called the sounds frequency, and is measured in Hertz (Hz). A whistle and bird song, for example, are high frequency sound, and thunder and the bass line of a rock song are low frequency sound. The normal hearing range of a young, healthy person ranges from about 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz (20 kHz). Some animals can hear lower and higher frequencies than can humans; for example bats, moths, and dogs hear frequencies higher than the human hearing range. Loss of hearing acuity involves the inability to hear sounds of certain frequencies, usually at the upper and lower bounds of normal hearing.


A sound that is made up of only one frequency is a pure tone. Most sound is made up of more than one tone, or several frequencies, sounding together. The quality, or timbre, of a sound is related to the presence and intensity of the additional tones contained in the sound; these overtones are the result of different frequencies sounding at the same time, resulting in a complex waveform. In addition, sound timbre includes the pattern of change over time of each of the tones. The relative intensity and pattern of change of each frequency in the sound is what allows us to describe sounds of the same fundamental frequency as tinny, flute-like, or brassy. One can thus discriminate between the human voice, a flute, a violin, and a french horn, each playing the same note. Industrial noises, on the other hand, consist of a wide mixture of frequencies, known as broad band noise. A sound composed of frequencies that are evenly distributed throughout the audible range is termed white noise and sounds somewhat like rushing water (Brüel & Kjær 1984).


Sound duration can be described by the pattern of sound in time and intensity, or level, and can be described as continuous, fluctuating, impulsive, or intermittent (U.S. EPA 1979). Continuous sounds are those produced for a long period of time at a relatively constant level, such as the rushing of water in a river. Fluctuating sounds vary in level over time, such as traffic noise at an intersection. Impulse noises are those sounds with an extremely short sound pressure peak of less than a second in total duration. Impulse noises may be repetitive and occur close together, as in hammering or riveting; be spaced out in time, as in manual hammering; or occur as a single event, such as a single gun shot or explosion (Niedzielski 1991). Intermittent noises are those recurring noises lasting a relatively short period of time, such as the ringing of a phone, or aircraft take offs and landings.


The intensity, or magnitude, of sound is described by the size or amplitude of the fluctuation in sound pressure. In general, the larger the amplitude, the louder the sound, although other factors also affect the perceived loudness of a sound. Over moderate distance, sound intensity decreases at a rate inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the source (Sataloff & Sataloff 1993). Thus, halving the distance from the source of the sound quadruples the sound intensity, assuming there are no interfering surfaces to reflect the sound waves.

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