Anna university of technology chennai :: chennai 600 113 regulations 2010




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OBJECTIVE



This subject deals with the pollution from major industries and methods of controlling the same. The student is expected to know about the polluting potential of major industries in the country and the methods of controlling the same.


UNIT I INTRODUCTION 8

Types of industries and industrial pollution – Characteristics of industrial wastes – Population equivalent – Bioassay studies – effects of industrial effluents on streams, sewer, land, sewage treatment plants and human health – Environmental legislations related to prevention and control of industrial effluents and hazardous wastes


UNIT II CLEANER PRODUCTION 8

Waste management Approach – Waste Audit – Volume and strength reduction – Material and process modifications – Recycle, reuse and byproduct recovery – Applications.


UNIT III POLLUTION FROM MAJOR INDUSTRIES 9

Sources, Characteristics, waste treatment flow sheets for selected industries such as Textiles, Tanneries, Pharmaceuticals, Electroplating industries, Dairy, Sugar, Paper, distilleries, Steel plants, Refineries, fertilizer, thermal power plants – Wastewater reclamation concepts


UNIT IV TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES 11

Equalisation – Neutralisation – Removal of suspended and dissolved organic solids - Chemical oxidation – Adsorption - Removal of dissolved inorganics – Combined treatment of industrial and municipal wastes – Residue management – Dewatering - Disposal


UNIT V HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT 9

Hazardous wastes - Physico chemical treatment – solidification – incineration – Secure land fills



TOTAL: 45 PERIODS


TEXT BOOKS

1. M.N.Rao & A.K.Dutta, “Wastewater Treatment”, Oxford - IBH Publication, 1995.

2. W .W. Eckenfelder Jr., “Industrial Water Pollution Control”, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New Delhi, 2000.


REFERENCES

1. T.T.Shen, “Industrial Pollution Prevention”, Springer, 1999.

2. R.L.Stephenson and J.B.Blackburn, Jr., “Industrial Wastewater Systems Hand book”, Lewis Publisher, New Yark, 1998

3. H.M.Freeman, “Industrial Pollution Prevention Hand Book”, McGraw-Hill Inc., New Delhi, 1995.

4. Bishop, P.L., “Pollution Prevention: Fundamental & Practice”, McGraw-Hill, 2000.

101777 AIR POLLUTION MANAGEMENT L T P C

3 0 0 3

OBJECTIVE


This subject covers the sources, characteristics and effects of air and noise pollution and the methods of controlling the same. The student is expected to know about source inventory and control mechanism.


UNIT I SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTANTS 9

Classification of air pollutants – Particulates and gaseous pollutants – Sources of air pollution – Source inventory – Effects of air pollution on human beings, materials, vegetation, animals – global warming-ozone layer depletion, Sampling and Analysis – Basic Principles of Sampling – Source and ambient sampling – Analysis of pollutants – Principles.


UNIT II DISPERSION OF POLLUTANTS 9

Elements of atmosphere – Meteorological factors – Wind roses – Lapse rate - Atmospheric stability and turbulence – Plume rise – Dispersion of pollutants – Dispersion models – Applications.


UNIT III AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 12

Concepts of control – Principles and design of control measures – Particulates control by gravitational, centrifugal, filtration, scrubbing, electrostatic precipitation – Selection criteria for equipment - gaseous pollutant control by adsorption, absorption, condensation, combustion – Pollution control for specific major industries.


UNIT IV AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT 8

Air quality standards – Air quality monitoring – Preventive measures - Air pollution control efforts – Zoning – Town planning regulation of new industries – Legislation and enforcement – Environmental Impact Assessment and Air quality


UNIT V NOISE POLLUTION 7

Sources of noise pollution – Effects – Assessment - Standards – Control methods – Prevention


TOTAL: 45 PERIODS

TEXT BOOKS

1. Anjaneyulu, D., “Air Pollution and Control Technologies”, Allied Publishers, Mumbai, 2002.

2. Rao, C.S. Environmental Pollution Control Engineering, Wiley Eastern Ltd., New Delhi, 1996.

3. Rao M.N., and Rao H. V. N., Air Pollution Control, Tata-McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 1996.


REFERENCES

1. W.L.Heumann, Industrial Air Pollution Control Systems, McGraw-Hill, New Yark, 1997.

2. Mahajan S.P., Pollution Control in Process Industries, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, New Delhi, 1991.

3. Peavy S.W., Rowe D.R. and Tchobanoglous G. Environmental Engineering, McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 1985.

4. Garg, S.K., “Environmental Engineering Vol. II”, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi

5. Mahajan, S.P., “Pollution Control in Process Industries”, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 1991.

101778 MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT L T P C

3 0 0 3


OBJECTIVE


This subject covers the various sources and characterisation of municipal solid wastes and the on-site/off-site processing of the same and the disposal methods. The student is expected to know about the various effects and disposal options for the municipal solid waste.


UNIT I SOURCES AND TYPES OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTES 9


Sources and types of solid wastes - Quantity – factors affecting generation of solid wastes; characteristics – methods of sampling and characterization; Effects of improper disposal of solid wastes – public health effects. Principle of solid waste management – social & economic aspects; Public awareness; Role of NGOs; Legislation.


UNIT II ON-SITE STORAGE & PROCESSING 9


On-site storage methods – materials used for containers – on-site segregation of solid wastes – public health & economic aspects of storage – options under Indian conditions – Critical Evaluation of Options.


UNIT III COLLECTION AND TRANSFER 9


Methods of Collection – types of vehicles – Manpower requirement – collection routes; transfer stations – selection of location, operation & maintenance; options under Indian conditions.


UNIT IV OFF-SITE PROCESSING 9


Processing techniques and Equipment; Resource recovery from solid wastes – composting, incineration, Pyrolysis - options under Indian conditions.


UNIT V DISPOSAL 9


Dumping of solid waste; sanitary land fills – site selection, design and operation of sanitary landfills – Leachate collection & treatment

TOTAL: 45 PERIODS


TEXT BOOKS

1. George Tchobanoglous et.al., “Integrated Solid Waste Management”, McGraw-Hill Publishers, 1993.

2. B.Bilitewski, G.HardHe, K.Marek, A.Weissbach, and H.Boeddicker, “Waste Management”, Springer, 1994.


REFERENCES

1. Manual on Municipal Solid Waste Management, CPHEEO, Ministry of Urban Development, Government of India, New Delhi, 2000

2. R.E.Landreth and P.A.Rebers, “Municipal Solid Wastes – problems and Solutions”, Lewis Publishers, 1997.

3. Bhide A.D. and Sundaresan, B.B., “Solid Waste Management in Developing Countries”, INSDOC, 1993.

101779 ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING L T P C

3 0 0 3


OBJECTIVE

This subject deals with the scope and applications of ecological principles for wastewater treatment and reuse. The student is expected to be aware of the various effects of industrialisation on ecology and ecological based waste purification methods.


UNIT I Principles and Concepts 9

Scope and applications of Ecological Engineering – Development and evolution of ecosystems – principles and concepts pertaining to species, populations and community


UNIT II ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONS 10

Energy flow and nutrient cycling – Food chain and food webs – biological magnification, diversity and stability, immature and mature systems. Primary productivity – Biochemical cycling of nitrogen, phosphorous, sulphur and carbon dioxide; Habitat ecology - Terrestrial, fresh water, estuarine and marine habitats.


UNIT III Ecological Engineering methods 9

Bio monitoring and its role in evaluation of aquatic ecosystem; Rehabilitation of ecosystems through ecological principles – step cropping, bio-wind screens, Wetlands, ponds, Root Zone Treatment for wastewater, Reuse of treated wastewater through ecological systems.


UNIT IV ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF INDUSTRIALISATION 9

Ecological effects of exploration, production, extraction, processing, manufacture & transport.


UNIT V CASE STUDIES 8

Case studies of integrated ecological engineering systems

TOTAL: 45 PERIODS


TEXT BOOKS

1. Odum, E.P., “Fundamental of Ecology”, W.B.Sauders, 1990.

2. Kormondy, E.J., “Concepts of Ecology”, Prentice Hall, New Delhi, 1996


REFERENCES

1. Mitch, J.W. and Jorgensen, S.E., Ecological Engineering – An Introduction to Ecotechnology, John Wiley and Sons, 1996.

2. Colinvaux, P., Ecology, John Wiley and Sons, 1996.

3. Etnier, C & Guterstam, B.,Ecological Engineering for Wastewater Treatment, 2nd Edition, Lewis Publications, London, 1996.

185765 CONTRACT LAWS AND REGULATIONS L T P C

3 0 0 3

UNIT I CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS 9


Indian Contracts Act – Elements of Contracts – Types of Contracts – Features – Suitability – Design of Contract Documents – International Contract Document – Standard Contract Document – Law of Torts


UNIT II TENDERS 10


Prequalification – Bidding – Accepting – Evaluation of Tender from Technical, Contractual and Commercial Points of View – Contract Formation and Interpretation – Potential Contractual Problems – World Bank Procedures and Guidelines – Transparency in Tenders Act.


UNIT III ARBITRATION 8


Comparison of Actions and Laws – Agreements – Subject Matter – Violations – Appointment of Arbitrators – Conditions of Arbitration – Powers and Duties of Arbitrator – Rules of Evidence – Enforcement of Award – Costs


UNIT IV LEGAL REQUIREMENTS 9


Insurance and Bonding – Laws Governing Sale, Purchase and Use of Urban and Rural Land – Land Revenue Codes – Tax Laws – Income Tax, Sales Tax, Excise and Custom Duties and their Influence on Construction Costs – Legal Requirements for Planning – Property Law – Agency Law – Local Government Laws for Approval – Statutory Regulations


UNIT V LABOUR REGULATIONS 9


Social Security – Welfare Legislation – Laws relating to Wages, Bonus and Industrial Disputes, Labour Administration– Insurance and Safety Regulations – Workmen’s Compensation Act – Indian Factory Act – Tamil Nadu Factory Act – Child Labour Act - Other Labour Laws


TOTAL: 45 PERIODS


REFERENCES


1. Gajaria G.T., Laws Relating to Building and Engineering Contracts in India, M.M.Tripathi Private Ltd., Bombay, 1982

2. Tamilnadu PWD Code, 1986

3. Jimmie Hinze, Construction Contracts, Second Edition, McGraw Hill, 2001

4. Joseph T. Bockrath, Contracts and the Legal Environment for Engineers and Architects, Sixth Edition, McGraw Hill, 2000.

101865 BRIDGE STRUCTURES L T P C

3 0 0 3


OBJECTIVE

At the end of this course the student shall be able to choose appropriate bridge structure and design it for given site conditions.


UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9

Design of through type steel highway bridges for IRC loading - Design of stringers, cross girders and main girders - Design of deck type steel highway bridges for IRC loading - Design of main girders

UNIT II STEEL BRIDGES 9

Design of pratt type truss girder highway bridges - Design of top chord, bottom chord, web members - Effect of repeated loading - Design of plate girder railway bridges for railway loading - Wind effects - Design of web and flange plates - Vertical and horizontal stiffeners.

UNIT III REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB BRIDGES 9

Design of solid slab bridges for IRC loading - Design of kerb - Design of tee beam bridges - Design of panel and cantilever for IRC loading


UNIT IV REINFORCED CONCRETE GIRDER BRIDGES 9

Design of tee beam - Courbon's theory - Pigeaud's curves - Design of balanced cantilever bridges - Deck slab - Main girder - Design of cantilever - Design of articulation.

UNIT V PRESTRESSED CONCRETE BRIDGES 9

Design of prestressed concrete bridges - Preliminary dimensions - Flexural and torsional parameters - Courbon's theory - Distribution coefficient by exact analysis - Design of girder section - Maximum and minimum prestressing forces - Eccentricity - Live load and dead load shear forces - cable zone in girder –Check for stresses at various sections - Check for diagonal tension - Diaphragms - End block - Short term and long term deflections.

TOTAL: 45 PERIODS 

TEXT BOOKS


1. Johnson Victor D., “Essentials of Bridge Engineering”, Oxford and IBH Publishing Co., New Delhi, 1990.

2. Rajagopalan, N.Bridge Superstructure, Alpha Science International, 2006


REFERENCES

1. Phatak D.R., “Bridge Engineering”, Satya Prakashan, New Delhi, 1990.

2. Ponnuswamy S., “Bridge Engineering”, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 1996.

101866 STORAGE STRUCTURES L T P C

3 0 0 3

OBJECTIVE

The main objective of this course is to impart the principles involved in designing structures which have to store different types of materials. The student at the end of the course shall be able to design concrete and steel material retaining structures.


UNIT I STEEL WATER TANKS 12

Design of rectangular riveted steel water tank – Tee covers – Plates – Stays –Longitudinal and transverse beams – Design of staging – Base plates – Foundation and anchor bolts – Design of pressed steel water tank – Design of stays – Joints – Design of hemispherical bottom water tank – side plates – Bottom plates – joints – Ring girder – Design of staging and foundation.


UNIT II CONCRETE WATER TANKS 12

Design of Circular tanks – Hinged and fixed at the base – IS method of calculating shear forces and moments – Hoop tension – Design of intze tank – Dome – Ring girders – Conical dome – Staging – Bracings – Raft foundation – Design of rectangular tanks – Approximate methods and IS methods – Design of under ground tanks – Design of base slab and side wall – Check for uplift.


UNIT III Steel Bunkers and Silos 7

Design of square bunker – Jansen’s and Airy’s theories – IS Codal provisions – Design of side plates – Stiffeners – Hooper – Longitudinal beams – Design of cylindrical silo – Side plates – Ring girder – stiffeners.


UNIT IV Concrete Bunkers and Silos 7

Design of square bunker – Side Walls – Hopper bottom – Top and bottom edge beams – Design of cylindrical silo – Wall portion – Design of conical hopper – Ring beam at junction


UNIT V PRESTRESSED CONCRETE WATER TANKS 7

Principles of circular prestressing – Design of prestressed concrete circular water tanks


TOTAL: 45 PERIODS

TEXT BOOKS

1. Rajagopalan K., Storage Structures, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 1998.

2. Krishna Raju N., Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design, CBS Publishers and Distributors, New Delhi, 1998.

101867 DESIGN OF PLATE AND SHELL STRUCTURES L T P C

3 0 0 3


OBJECTIVE

At the end of this course the student shall understand the rudimentary principles involved in the analysis and design of plates and shells.


UNIT I THIN PLATES WITH SMALL DEFLECTION 9

Laterally loaded thin plates – governing differential equations – Simply supported and fixed boundary conditions


UNIT II RECTANGULAR PLATES 9

Simply supported rectangular plates – Navier’s solution and Levy’s method.


UNIT III THIN SHELLS 9

Classification of shells-structural actions – membrane theory


UNIT IV ANALYSIS OF SHELLS 9

Analysis of spherical dome – cylindrical shells – folded plates


UNIT V DESIGN OF SHELLS 9

Design of spherical dome – cylindrical shells – folded plates


TOTAL: 45 PERIODS

TEXT BOOKS

1. Bairagi N K, A text book of Plate Analysis, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 1996.

2. G.S. Ramaswamy, Design and Construction of Shell Structures, CBS Plublishers,

New Delhi, 1996

3. S. Timoshenko & S. Woinowsky – Krieger, “Theory of Plates and Shells”, McGraw Hill Book Company

REFERENCES

1. Szilard R, Theory and analysis of plates, Prentice Hall Inc, 1995

2. Chatterjee B. K., Theory and Design of Concrete Shells, Oxford & IBH, New Delhi, 1998 3. Billington D. P., Thin Shell Concrete Structures, McGraw-Hill, 1995.


101868 TALL BUILDINGS L T P C

3 0 0 3

OBJECTIVE

At the end of this course the student should have understood the problems associated with large heights of structures with respect to loads (wind and earthquake and deflections of the structure). He should know the rudimentary principles of designing tall buildings as per the existing course.


UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9

The Tall Building in the Urban Context - The Tall Building and its Support Structure - Development of High Rise Building Structures - General Planning Considerations. Dead Loads - Live Loads-Construction Loads -Snow, Rain, and Ice Loads - Wind Loads-Seismic Loading –Water and Earth Pressure Loads - Loads - Loads Due to Restrained Volume Changes of Material - Impact and Dynamic Loads - Blast Loads -Combination of Loads.

UNIT II THE VERTICAL STRUCTURE PLANE 9

Dispersion of Vertical Forces- Dispersion of Lateral Forces - Optimum Ground Level Space - Shear Wall Arrangement - Behaviour of Shear Walls under Lateral Loading. The Floor Structure or Horizontal Building Plane Floor Framing Systems-Horizontal Bracing- Composite Floor Systems The High - Rise Building as related to assemblage Kits Skeleton Frame Systems - Load Bearing Wall Panel Systems - Panel – Frame Systems - Multistory Box Systems.

UNIT III COMMON HIGH-RISE BUILDING STRUCTURES AND THEIR BEHAVIOUR UNDER LOAD 9

The Bearing Wall Structure- The Shear Core Structure - Rigid Frame Systems- The Wall - Beam Structure: Interspatial and Staggered Truss Systems - Frame - Shear Wall Building Systems - Flat Slab Building Structures - Shear Truss - Frame Interaction System with Rigid - Belt Trusses - Tubular Systems-Composite Buildings - Comparison of High - Rise Structural Systems Other Design Approaches Controlling Building Drift Efficient Building Forms - The Counteracting Force or Dynamic Response.

UNIT IV APPROXIMATE STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF BUILDINGS 9

Approximate Analysis of Bearing Wall Buildings The Cross Wall Structure - The Long Wall Structure The Rigid Frame Structure Approximate Analysis for Vertical Loading - Approximate Analysis for Lateral Loading - Approximate Design of Rigid Frame Buildings-Lateral Deformation of Rigid Frame Buildings The Rigid Frame - Shear Wall Structure - The Vierendeel Structure - The Hollow Tube Structure.


UNIT V OTHER HIGH-RISE BUILDING STRUCTURE 9

Deep - Beam Systems -High-Rise Suspension Systems - Pneumatic High -Rise Buildings - Space Frame Applied to High - Rise Buildings - Capsule Architecture.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS 

TEXT BOOKS


1. WOLFGANG SCHUELLER " High - rise building Structures", John Wiley and Sons, New York 1976.

2. Bryan Stafford Smith and Alex Coull, " Tall Building Structures ", Analysis and Design, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1991.


REFERENCES


1. COULL, A. and SMITH, STAFFORD, B. " Tall Buildings ", Pergamon Press, London, 1997.

2. LinT.Y. and Burry D.Stotes, " Structural Concepts and Systems for Architects and Engineers ", John Wiley, 1994.

3. Lynn S.Beedle, Advances in Tall Buildings, CBS Publishers and Distributors, Delhi, 1996.

4. Taranath.B.S., Structural Analysis and Design of Tall Buildings, Mc Graw Hill,1998.

101869 PREFABRICATED STRUCTURES L T P C

3 0 0 3


OBJECTIVE

At the end of this course the student shall be able to appreciate modular construction, industrialised construction and shall be able to design some of the prefabricated elements and also have the knowledge of the construction methods using these elements.


UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9

Need for prefabrication – Principles – Materials – Modular coordination – Standarization – Systems – Production – Transportation – Erection.

UNIT II PREFABRICATED COMPONENTS 9

Behaviour of structural components – Large panel constructions – Construction of roof and floor slabs – Wall panels – Columns – Shear walls


UNIT III DESIGN PRINCIPLES 9

Disuniting of structures- Design of cross section based on efficiency of material used – Problems in design because of joint flexibility – Allowance for joint deformation.


UNIT IV JOINT IN STRUCTURAL MEMBERS 9

Joints for different structural connections – Dimensions and detailing – Design of expansion joints


UNIT V DESIGN FOR ABNORMAL LOADS 9

Progressive collapse – Code provisions – Equivalent design loads for considering abnormal effects such as earthquakes, cyclones, etc., - Importance of avoidance of progressive collapse.


TOTAL: 45 PERIODS

TEXT BOOKS

1. CBRI, Building materials and components, India, 1990

2. Gerostiza C.Z., Hendrikson C. and Rehat D.R., Knowledge based process planning for construction and manufacturing, Academic Press Inc., 1994


REFERENCES

1. Koncz T., Manual of precast concrete construction, Vols. I, II and III, Bauverlag, GMBH, 1971.

2. Structural design manual, Precast concrete connection details, Society for the studies in the use of precast concrete, Netherland Betor Verlag, 1978.

101870 WIND ENGINEERING L T P C

3 0 0 3


OBJECTIVE

At the end of this course the student should be able to appreciate the forces generated on structures due to normal wind as well as gusts. He should also be able to analyse the dynamic effects created by these wind forces.


UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9

Terminology – Wind Data – Gust factor and its determination - Wind speed variation with height – Shape factor – Aspect ratio – Drag and lift.


UNIT II EFFECT OF WIND ON STRUCTURES 9

Static effect – Dynamic effect – Interference effects (concept only) – Rigid structure – Aeroelastic structure (concept only).


UNIT III EFFECT ON TYPICAL STRUCTURES 9

Tail buildings – Low rise buildings – Roof and cladding – Chimneys, towers and bridges.


UNIT IV Application to Design 9

Design forces on multistorey building, towers and roof trusses.


UNIT V Introduction to wind Tunnel 9

Types of models (Principles only) – Basic considerations – Examples of tests and their use.


TOTAL: 45 PERIODS


TEXT BOOKS

1. Peter Sachs, “Wind Forces in Engineering, Pergamon Press, New York, 1992.

2. Lawson T.V., Wind Effects on Buildings, Vols. I and II, Applied Science and Publishers, London, 1993.


REFERENCES

1. Devenport A.G., “Wind Loads on Structures”, Division of Building Research, Ottowa, 1990.

2. Wind Force on Structures – Course Notes, Building Technology Centre, Anna University, 1995.

101871 COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN OF STRUCTURE L T P C

3 0 0 3

OBJECTIVE



The main objective of this programme is to train the student in the use of computers and creating a computer code as well as using commercially available software for the design of Civil Engineering structures.


UNIT I INTRODUCTION 9

Fundamentals of CAD - Hardware and software requirements -Design process - Applications and benefits.


UNIT II COMPUTER GRAPHICS 9

Graphic primitives - Transformations -Wire frame modeling and solid modeling -Graphic standards –Drafting packages


UNIT III STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS 9

Fundamentals of finite element analysis - Principles of structural analysis -Analysis packages and applications.


UNIT IV DESIGN AND OPTIMISATION 9

Principles of design of steel and RC Structures -Applications to simple design problems – Optimisation techniques - Algorithms - Linear Programming – Simplex method


UNIT V EXPERT SYSTEMS 9

Introduction to artificial intelligence - Knowledge based expert systems -Rules and decision tables –Inference mechanisms - Simple applications.

TOTAL: 45 PERIODS

TEXT BOOKS

1. Groover M.P. and Zimmers E.W. Jr., “CAD/CAM, Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing”, Prentice Hall of India Ltd, New Delhi, 1993.

2. Krishnamoorthy C.S.Rajeev S., “Computer Aided Design”, Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi, 1993


REFERENCES

1. Harrison H.B., “Structural Analysis and Design”, Part I and II Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1990.

2. Rao S.S., “Optimisation Theory and Applications”, Wiley Eastern Limited, New Delhi, 1977.

3. Richard Forsyth (Ed), “Expert System Principles and Case Studies”, Chapman and Hall, London, 1989.




101872 INDUSTRIAL STRUCTURES L T P C

3 0 0 3

OBJECTIVE



This course deals with some of the special aspects with respect to Civil Engineering structures in industries. At the end of this course the student shall be able to design some of the structures.


UNIT I PLANNING 9

Classification of Industries and Industrial structures – General requirements for industries like cement, chemical and steel plants – Planning and layout of buildings and components.


UNIT II FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS 9


Lighting – Ventilation – Acoustics – Fire safety – Guidelines from factories act.


UNIIT III DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES 9


Industrial roofs – Crane girders – Mill buildings – Design of Bunkers and Silos


UNIT IV DESIGN OF R.C. STRUCTURES 9


Silos and bunkers – Chimneys – Principles of folded plates and shell roofs


UNIT V PREFABRICATION 9


Principles of prefabrication – Prestressed precast roof trusses- Functional requirements for Precast concrete units

TOTAL: 45 PERIODS


TEXT BOOKS

1. Reinforced Concrete Structural elements – P. Purushothaman.

2. Pasala Dayaratnam – Design of Steel Structure – 1990.


REFERENCES

1. Henn W. Buildings for Industry, vols.I and II, London Hill Books, 1995.

2. Handbook on Functional Requirements of Industrial buildings, SP32 – 1986, Bureau of Indian Standards, New Delhi 1990.

3. Course Notes on Modern Developments in the Design and Construction of Industrial Structures, Structural Engineering Research Centre, Madras, 1982.

4. Koncz, J, Manual of Precast Construction Vol I & II Bauverlay GMBH, 1971.

101873 SMART MATERIALS AND SMART STRUCTURES L T P C

3 0 0 3

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