Foundation Degree in Animal Management and Welfare




НазваниеFoundation Degree in Animal Management and Welfare
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Section 4: Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit students will have an in depth and comprehensive knowledge of how reproduction occurs and the technologies available. They will have a detailed understanding of how to manage and care for breeding and young stock, and the responsibilities of all breeders. They will be introduced to a wide range of problems and complications that can occur when breeding animals, and how to manage these should they occur.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/Methods

Students will achieve their learning outcomes through lectures, seminars and practical delivery. Students will be encouraged to carry out independent research and develop their research skills learnt at level 1. Visits to breeding centres (such as Guide Dogs for the Blind), Zoos, stud farms and research centres will be used where possible. Guest speakers will be used where appropriate to ensure that content is current and accurate.


Section 6: Assessment

Assessment will be in two parts:

Completion of written coursework (50%);

Unseen examination (50%).


Section 7: Relationship to Professional Body

N/A


Section 8: Indicative Reading

Dyce, K.M., Sack, W.O., Wensing, C.J.G. (2002) Textbook of veterinary anatomy. 3rd edition. Philadelphia, Saunders. ISBN 072 168 9663.

Hayward, G. (1992) Applied Genetics. Walton-on-Thames, Nelson. ISBN 017 438 5110.

Kleiman, D.G. et al. (eds.) (1996) Wild mammals in captivity: principles and techniques. Chicago, University of Chicago Press. ISBN 022 644 0036.

Davies-Morel, M.C.G. (2002) Equine Reproductive physiology, Breeding and Stud Management. Oxford, CABI publishing. ISBN: 0851996434

Dyce, K.M., Sack, W.O., Wensing, C.J.G. (2002) Textbook of veterinary anatomy. 3rd edition. Philadelphia, Saunders. ISBN 072 168 9663.

Johnson, M.H. & Everitt, B.J. (2000) Essential Reproduction. 5th edition. Oxford, Blackwell Science Ltd. ISBN: 0632042877


Journals

Biology of Reproduction

Reproduction

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Veterinary Microbiology


Faculty

Health, Life and Social Sciences


Department

Biological Science


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

Animal Management and Welfare

Bio-Veterinary Science

Equine Science

Equine Sports Science


Code:

Bioxxx


Credit Rating:


15


Level:


2


Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None


Barred Combinations:


None


Module Co-ordinator:


L. Wojnarowicz



Section 2: Module Synopsis

The Veterinary Microbiology course is intended to provide the student with an appreciation and adequate knowledge of animal microbiology, especially in relation to infectious diseases. This unit is also intended to support subjects such as animal and equine disease and (clinical) nutrition. It will provide the student with a foundation in animal microbiology from which further in depth microbiology and disease related research and training is possible.


Section 3: Outline Syllabus

Principles of good laboratory practice.

Basic microscopy, culture and identification.

Immunology and genetics in microbiology.

Treatment methods of infectious diseases.

Disease prevention and epidemiology

Bacteria of veterinary importance.

Fungi of veterinary importance.

Viruses of veterinary importance.

Zoonoses and the principles of control of infectious diseases.


Section 4: Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit the student will be able to:

Demonstrate knowledge (including basic recall of microbiology terminology), understanding (e.g. relating cell structure to function) as well as analytical and evaluative insight (e.g. predicting virulence) applicable to:

    1. Basic microscopy, culture and identification.

    2. Immunology and genetics in microbiology.

    3. Treatment methods of infectious diseases.

    4. Disease prevention and epidemiology

    5. Bacteria of veterinary importance.

    6. Fungi of veterinary importance.

    7. Viruses of veterinary importance.

    8. Zoonoses and the principles of control of infectious diseases.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/Methods

The unit syllabus will be covered through a programme of lectures and practical classes. Where appropriate practical classes will include tutorial topics and group work which will extend in to the students’ self directed study time. Students will be expected to carry out independent research and develop their research skills learnt at level 1


Section 6: Assessment

Assessment will be in two parts:

Coursework (50%); and

Phase test (50%).


Section 7: Relationship to Professional Body

N/A


Section 8: Indicative Reading

Lecturer will advise students of recent publications, reliable current electronic sources, and new editions of books

Collins, C.H. et al. (1995). Collins and Lyne’s microbiological methods. Oxford, Butterworth-Heinemann. ISBN 075 060 6533.

Gross, T. et al. (1995). Introductory microbiology. London, Chapman and Hall. ISBN 041 245 3002.

Ikram, M., Hill, E. (1991) Microbiology for veterinary technicians. Goleta, Ca., American Veterinary Publications. ISBN 093 967 4300.

Prescott, L.M. et al. (2002). Microbiology. Boston, McGraw-Hill. ISBN 007 112 2605.

Quinn, P.J. et al. (1994). Clinical veterinary microbiology. London, Wolfe Publ. ISBN 072 341 7113.

Schlegel, H.G., Zaborosch, C. (1993). General microbiology. 7th edition. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. ISBN 052 143 9809.

Talaro, K.P., Talaro, A. (2002). Foundations in microbiology. 4th edition. Boston, McGraw-Hill. ISBN 007 232 0427.

Volk, W.A., Brown, J.C. (1992). Basic microbiology. 8th edition. Menlo Park, Ca, Benjamin Cummings. ISBN 067 399 5607.

Wilkinson, J.F. (1986). Introduction to microbiology. 3rd edition. Oxford, Blackwell Scientific. ISBN 063 200 8660.


CD-ROM: Microbiology II


Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Wildlife Management


Faculty

Health, Life and Social Sciences


Department

Biological Science


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

Animal Management and Welfare



Code:




Credit Rating:


15


Level:


1


Pre-requisites:


None


Co-requisites:


None


Barred Combinations:


None


Module Co-ordinator:


C. Huff



Section 2: Module Synopsis

This unit is designed to develop skills and knowledge for the management, care and rehabilitation of a wide range of species in a variety of habitats and countries. The unit also covers welfare, legislation and ethical value of this type of work.


Section 3: Outline Syllabus


Review and investigate the management and rehabilitation of British wildlife

Investigate accommodation requirements for a range of species both long and short term casualties in capacity.

Review the nutritional requirements within a wildlife rehabilitation centre.

Release management and protocols for a range of species.

Common causes, injuries and diseases.


Investigate and review the management and rehabilitation non indigenous species in the UK.

Investigate accommodation requirements in capacity for a range of non indigenous species both long and short casualties.

Review the nutritional requirements and feeding regimes of a range of non indigenous species in captivity.

Evaluate the husbandry requirements within a wildlife rehabilitation centre.

Release management and protocols for a range of non indigenous species.

Designation and protection of land, water and wildlife agencies and bodies involved in environmental industry.


Discuss the handling and health and safety management of wildlife casualties.

Legislation surrounding the handling of British wildlife.

Discuss the handling and restraint techniques for a range of British wildlife casualties.

Methods of capture and transportation of British wildlife casualties. PPE and handling equipment and training.


Review the ethical implications and practicalities of managing animals in captivity.

Investigate captive situations.

Justification of intervention for rehabilitation.

Wild vs. captive – Discuss welfare issues.

Use of wild species for education and research.


Section 4: Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit learners will have a detailed understanding of management and rehabilitation of British wildlife, both indigenous and non-indigenous species. They will also have knowledge of handling and health and safety management of wildlife casualties, as well as the ethics and practicalities of managing animals in captivity.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/Methods

This module will be taught using a mixture of lectures, visits, visiting speakers and practical sessions. Students will be expected to carry out independent research and develop their research skills learnt at level 1.

Visits will include but not limited to: Twycross Zoo, Bradgate Park, Exotic Pet Rescue, on site facilities, Wildlife Hospitals, Rutland Water, Rockingham Forest, Wildlife Centres – Whipsnade/Woburn Safari Park.


Section 6: Assessment

Assessment will be in the form of two written pieces of coursework worth 50% each.


Section 7: Relationship to Professional Body

None


Section 8: Indicative Reading


Lecturer will advise students of recent publications, reliable current electronic sources, and new editions of books


Entwistle A. C., 2001 Habitat Management for Bats – a guide for land managers, land owners and their advisors, Joint Nature Conservation Committee, uk

Gage, L. J., 2002, Hand rearing wild and domestic Mammals, Blackwell science, Oxford.

Kleiman, D. E, Allen, M. E. Thompson, k. v. Humpkin, S., 1996, Wild animals in Captivity Principles and Techniques, The University of Chicago Press. Chicago.

Lane, E and Tait, J. 1990, Woodlands, Hodder and Stoughton

Morrison, M. L., 2002, Wildlife Restoratina – Techniques for Habitat Analysis and Animal Monitoring Island.

Mullineaux, E, Best, D. Cooper, J.E. 2003, BVSA Manual of Wildlife Casualties, British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

Peterken, G. 1993, Woodland Conservation and Management, Chapman and Hall.

Tate, J. Lane, A and Carr, S., (1988) Practical Conservation: Site Assessment and Management Planning – Hodder and Stoughton.

Stocker, L. 2000, Practical Wildlife Care, Blackwell Science, Oxford.

Strier, K. B., 2003, Primate Behavioural Ecology, 2nd Edition, Allyn and Bacon, London.

Sutherland, W. J., 1996 Ecological Census Techniques – A handbook, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.


Journals:

Nature

BBC Wildlife

New Scientist

Ratel

International Zoo News

Paws 4 Rescue

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Work Experience


Faculty

Health, Life and Social Sciences


Department

Biological Science


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

Animal Management and Welfare


Code:

Bioxxx


Credit Rating:


30


Level:


2


Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None


Barred Combinations:


None


Module Co-ordinator:


J. Mee



Section 2: Module Synopsis

This unit is designed to provide an opportunity for students to gain real practical experience within the industry. Students will undertake a work placement and a work-based study linked to it.


Section 3: Outline Syllabus

Work placement - a minimum of 390 hours (10 weeks) must be undertaken and a review of main duties must be included.

Organisation Review - Report on the organisation – outlines, staffing structure, responsibilities, and purpose of business. Development of business, history –

Health and safety and Legislation - Show awareness what acts/legislation affect the business and the employees.

Evaluate personal development and staff development strategies - Evaluate own performance and develop an action plan to develop self. Identify staff appraisal scheme or performance review and its effect on the employees.

Identify and review the organisations Policies and procedures and report on effectiveness - Identify all the policies used by the organisation for example health and safety, accident, disciplinary etc. Evaluate policies and procedures and effectiveness on the organisation’s operation.


Section 4: Learning Outcomes

The student will be able to:


  1. Develop employability skills/Carry out work placement

  2. Organisation Review

  3. Health and safety and Legislation

  4. Evaluate personal development and staff development strategies.

  5. Identify and review the organisations Policies and procedures and report on effectiveness.



Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/Methods

Students are required to carry out a minimum of 390 hours (10 weeks) experience whilst on the course, it is envisaged that most will carry out the majority of this between May – October of the first year – Second year. Any student who is currently employed on a full time or part time (16 hours per week) may use their current employment if related to the animal industry.


Section 6: Assessment

Assessment will be 100% coursework (to include a review of placement and employer feedback).


Section 7: Relationship to Professional Body

N/A

This copy released on 21st November
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