Foundation Degree in Animal Management and Welfare




НазваниеFoundation Degree in Animal Management and Welfare
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Essential Reading


Martin, G., Pear, J. (2006) Behavior modification: what it is and how to do it. 6th edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ, Prentice Hall.

Essential Journals


Animal Cognition

Anthrozoos

Applied Animal Behaviour Science

Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Journal of Veterinary Behavior – Clinical Applications and Research

The Veterinary Record

Useful Texts


Chance, P. (2002) Learning and Behaviour. Pacific Grove, Brook-Cole.

Lieberman, D.A. (1999) Learning: behavior and cognition. 2nd edition. Pacific Grove, USA, Brooks Cole.

Lindsay, S.R. (2000) Handbook of applied dog behavior and training. Vol. 1. Adaptation and learning. Ames, Iowa, Iowa State University Press.

Powell R.A. Symbaluk D.G. MacDonald S.E. (2001) Introduction to Learning & Behavior, Wadsworth, Belmont.

Pryor, K. (1999) Don’t shoot the dog! The new art of teaching and training. New York, Bantam Books.

Reid, P.J. (1996) Excel-erated learning: explaining in plain English how dogs learn and how best to teach them. Hertfordshire, James & Kenneth Publishers.


Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Animal Rehabilitation

Faculty

Health, Life & Social Sciences


Department

Biological Sciences


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

Animal Management and Welfare


Code:

Bioxxx


Credit Rating:


15


Level:


2


Pre-requisites:


None


Co-requisites:


None


Barred Combinations:


None


Module Co-ordinator:


K. Lord



Section 2: Module Synopsis

This unit is intended to provide students with an understanding of rehabilitation techniques currently in use on a range of different animals on a mental and physical level. It will emphasise the differences between the rehabilitation of different animals, from wildlife to performance animals. It will examine the physical processes of healing and assess the therapies available to maximise an animal’s potential. The unit will emphasis to the student the limitations and constraints which apply to a lay person with respect to certain areas covered by the unit.


Section 3: Outline Syllabus


Physical rehabilitation following injury

The healing process, bone injury and repair, ligament injury and repair, tendon injury and repair, how injuries occur and how they might be prevented.


Range of rehabilitation techniques and the legislation surrounding them

Massage, acupressure, acupuncture, hot and cold treatments, physiotherapy, chiropractic osteopathy, hydrotherapy, aromatherapy, McTimoney animal manipulation, T-Touch, shiatsu and any other relevant therapies.

Stretches, soft tissue manipulation, muscle development, rebalance, re-introduction of work (performance animals).

Comparison of physical rehabilitation and techniques available with domestic and performance animals.

Legislation and limitations on animal therapists, the role of professional and consultative bodies.


Behaviour modification techniques and strategies

The development of behaviour problems in a range of animals, from domestic animals to wild animals in captivity.

Treatment techniques and strategies available (link to Behaviour module).


Environmental enrichment

Principles and practice in environmental enrichment, identification and satisfaction of behavioural needs, treatment of behavioural problems, the significance of enrichment techniques during rehabilitation (physical and mental) of both wild and domestic animals.


Section 4: Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this module, the student will be able to assess rehabilitation techniques and compare the differences between physical and mental rehabilitation in a range of animals. They will gain a thorough understanding of the alternative therapies available and will be able to fully assess situations necessitating their use. Students will have a comprehensive knowledge of how injuries occur in different tissue types, how the body’s natural healing process works and how we can work to minimise or prevent injury. They should feel confident in assessing all rehabilitation situations and implementing a treatment plan, whilst taking in to consideration all moral and ethical dilemmas.

.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/Methods

Students will achieve their learning outcomes through lectures, seminars and practical delivery. Students will be encouraged to carry out independent research and develop their research skills learnt at level 1. Visits to veterinary practices, zoos, re-homing centres, rehabilitation centres, animal hospitals and specialist centres will be used where possible. Guest speakers and demonstrations will be used where appropriate to ensure that content is current and accurate.


Section 6: Assessment

The assessment profile will have two components

50% coursework consisting of 1 written assessment.

50% examination – one two hour examination at the end of the module.


Section 7: Relationship to Professional Body

None


Section 8: Indicative Reading

Allison, K. The Holistic Management of Horses. (1996). J.A. Allen and Co. Ltd.

Baxter, R. (1999) Horse Injuries: their prevention and treatment. Crowood, Marlborough. ISBN1861262604

Blignault, K. (2003) Stretch exercise for your horse. J. a. Allen, London. ISBN0851318606

Brennan, M.L. (2001). Complete Holistic Care and Healing for Horses: The Owner’s Veterinary Guide to Alternative Methods and Remedies. Kenilworth Press.

Bromiley, M. (1987). Equine Injury and Therapy. Blackwell Science Ltd.

Day, C. (1998). The Homeopathic Treatment of Small Animals: Principles and Practice. The C.W. Daniel Company Ltd.

Denoix, J. and Pailloux, J. (2001). Physical Therapy and Massage for the Horse. Manson Publishing.

Emich, G. (1994). Naturopathy for Horses. J.A. Allen and Co. Ltd.

Gardiner, A. (2002). First Aid for Dogs. J.A. Allen and Co. Ltd.

Hayes, M. H. (2002) Veterinary notes for horse owners. Ebury Press, London. ISBN 0091879388

Hunter, F. (1988). Homeopathic First Aid Treatment for Pets. Thorsons Publishing Group.

Lane, D.R. and Cooper, B. (1997). Veterinary Nursing. Butterworth and Heinemann.

Macleod, G. (1997). The Treatment of Horses by Homeopathy. C.W. Daniel Ltd.

Macleod, G. (1989). Dogs: Homeopathic Remedies. C.W. Daniel Ltd.

Tellington-Jones, L. (1993). The Tellington TTouch. Penguin Books.


Veterinary Nursing Journal

The Equine Veterinary Journal

The Horse Magazine


www.agilitynet.com

www.britisheventing.com

www.the-kennel-club.org.uk

www.naturalhorse.co.uk


Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Practical Animal Nutrition


Faculty

Health Life & Social Science


Department

Biological Sciences


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

Animal Management and Welfare

Code:

Bioxxx


Credit Rating:


15


Level:


2

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


J. Mee


Section 2: Module Synopsis

This unit concentrates on the function, digestion and utilisation of nutrients, as well as factors which influence food intake. Methods of evaluating diets and feedstuffs will also be recognised and the impact this has on a range of animals in a variety of circumstances.


Section 3: Outline Syllabus


Basic constituents of a feed - water, carbohydrates, lipids, nitrogenous compounds – and an introduction to proximate analysis.

Vitamins and minerals – requirements, functions, signs of deficiency.


Digestive systems – principles of digestion, simple stomached digestive system, ruminant digestive system, hindgut fermentation, birds.


Factors affecting appetite and voluntary food intake – CNS regulation, long term and short term control, palatability, sensory influences, disease.


Ration formulation and life stage diets pregnancy, lactation, stress, adolescent, geriatric and adult


Section 4: Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

Analyse the nature and function of the basic constituents of a feed

Examine the structure and physiology of digestive systems

Analyse factors affecting the long and short term control of voluntary food intake

Examine the nature and function of vitamins and minerals


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/Methods

Students will achieve their learning outcomes through participation in lectures, laboratory sessions, practical sessions, tutorials and unit specific study. Students will be encouraged to carry out their own research and develop their research skills learnt at level 1.


Section 6: Assessment

Assessment will be based on a report (50%) and an in-class phase test (50%).


Section 7: Relationship to Professional Body

N/A


Section 8: Indicative Reading

Agar, S, 2001, Small Aminal Nutrition, Butterworth and Heinemann

Church, D.C., Pond, W.G., Pond, K.R. (1995) Basic Animal Nutrition and Feeding 4th ed. John Wiley and Sons. ISBN 0471308641

Cuddeford, D. (2003) Equine Nutrition. Crowood Press. ISBN 1861265654

Frape, D. (2004) Equine Nutrition and Feeding, 3rd ed. Blackwell publishing, UK. ISBN 1405105984

Greenhalgh, J.F., Morgan, C., Edwards, R. (2002) Animal Nutrition. Prentice Hall. ISBN 0582419069

Lewis L.D. (1995) Feeding and care of the horse. Williams and Wilkins. ISBN 0683049674

McDowell, L.R. (2000) Vitamins in Animal and Human Nutrition. Iowa State University Press. ISBN 0813826306

Rook, J.A.F. and Thomas, P.C. (1983) Nutritional Physiology of Farm Animals. Longman. ISBN 0582455871

Underwood, E.J. and Suttle, N.F. (1999), The Mineral Nutrition of Livestock. CABI publishing. ISBN 0851991289


Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Management of Breeding Stock


Faculty

Health Life & Social Science


Department

Biological Sciences


Programme(s) in which this module appears:

Animal Management and Welfare

Code:

Bioxxx


Credit Rating:


15


Level:


2

Pre-requisites:


None

Co-requisites:


None

Barred Combinations:


None

Module Co-ordinator:


TBC


Section 2: Module Synopsis

This unit is intended to provide an introduction to reproduction and modern advances in reproductive technologies. It focuses on the management of breeding stock and the care of young stock. It highlights the ethical responsibilities that breeders have and looks at problems that might occur. It looks at genetic and hereditary conditions, and highlights the importance of maintaining breeding records.


Section 3: Outline Syllabus


Selecting of breeding stock - Reproductive anatomy and physiology, objectives of breeding, genetics and heritability, suitability of stock – genotype, phenotype, health, temperament and performance.


Management of breeding stock - Stud males, breeding females through oestrus, mating, pregnancy, parturition and rearing, contraception, euthanasia. Care of young stock – rearing, hand rearing, fostering, weaning, socialisation, early training, homing. Data management, legislative requirements for record keeping, studbooks, animal transfers.


Problems and Complications - Diseases and infections of male and female.

Infertility, aggression, dystocia, post-partum problems, presentation problems, etc. Genetic pre-dispositions and hereditary conditions.


Advances in reproductive technologies - Biotechnology – infertility treatments, superovulation and synchronisation, ovulation indicators, artificial insemination, embryo transplant, pregnancy diagnosis, cloning, genetic analysis and engineering, transgenics. Ethical viewpoints.

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