Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1




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EET 210 - Fundamentals of Semiconductors
Standard Course Outline (Updated Fall 2004)



Catalog Data:

210: Fundamentals of Semiconductors
(3 credits). Study of the theory and application of linear electronic devices and circuits, including integrated circuits and operational amplifiers. Prerequisites: MATH 81 and EET 101 and EET 109.

Goals:

Fundamentals of Semiconductors is a required course for sophomore students in the Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) associate degree program. The purpose of the course is to teach students to analyze and design amplifiers using operational amplifiers. The student will also master the application of operational amplifiers and other integrated circuits to create oscillators, communications systems, and data conversion systems.

Relationship of EET Program Outcomes:

EET 210 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:

  • Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic controllers (Outcome 1)

  • Students should be able to apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering concepts to technical problem solving (Outcome 3)

Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the program are:

Outcome 1:

  • Students will understand concept of three terminal devices with dependent sources and be able to analyze operation.

  • Students will understand the construction of diodes (p-n junctions) and be able to analyze operation of rectification circuits.

  • Students will understand the construction of bipolar junction transistors and field effect transistors and be able bias these and analyze their DC operation

  • Students will understand the basic operation of operational amplifiers and be able to design and analyze simple comparators.

  • Students will understand the use of negative feedback in operational amplifiers circuits and be able to analyze voltage, current, resistance and conductance amplifiers and simple active filters.

Outcome 3:

  • Students will apply concepts in algebra in conjunction with network theorems to simplify and quantitatively analyze electronic circuits containing diodes, bipolar or field effect transistors, and operational amplifiers.

  • Students will apply concepts in algebra and complex algebra in conjunction with fundamental electronic laws to quantitatively analyze electronic circuits containing diodes, bipolar or field effect transistors, and operational amplifiers.

Suggested Text:

Floyd, Electronic Devices, Merrill.

Alternate Texts:

Malvino, Electronic Principles, McGraw-Hill

Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering the course:

  • Algebra and introductory trigonometry.

  • DC and AC circuit analysis.

Course Topics:

Suggested topical coverage by week for 1st ed. of Floyd text

  1. Introduction to Semiconductors and Diodes. (1-1 to 1-9)

  2. Introduction to Bipolar Junction Transistors. (4-1 to 4-4)

  3. Introduction to Field Effects Transistors. (8-1 to 8-4)

  4. Introduction to Operational Amplifiers. (12-1 to 12-3)
    --  Exam #1

  5. Negative Feedback and Compensation (12-4 to 12-7)

  6. Op-Amp Frequency Response, Basic Concepts. (13-1 to 13-3)

  7. Op-Amp Frequency Response, Stability & Compensation. (13-4,13-5)

  8. Basic Op-Amps Circuits, Comparators, Summing Amplifiers, Integrators/Differentiators and A/D and D/A Circuits. (14-1 to 14-3)

  9. Instrumentation and Isolation Amplifiers. (15-1,15-2)

  10. Transconductance, Log/Antilog, & Converter Amps. (15-3 to 15-5)
    -- Exam #2

  11. Active Filters, Basic Responses. (16-1, 16-2)

  12. Active Filters, Low/High Pass, Band Pass/Stop. (16-3 to 16-6)

  13. Oscillator Basics. (17-1,17-2)

  14. Oscillators and Timers. (17-3 to 17-6)

  15. Communications Systems (AM & FM). (supplied by instructor)
    -- Final Exam

Calculator Use:

Students are expected to own and know how to use a scientific calculator, such as the TI-85/86 or equivalent.

Computer Use:

Students are expected to use PSPICE for Windows, Electronic Workbench, or equivalent software, especially for calculating and presenting the frequency response of amplifiers.

Course Grading:

Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.

Comments & Suggestions:

  • Students should also be enrolled in EET 205, the lab associated with this class. The lab should be taught by the same instructor.

  • The troubleshooting portions of the text are best discussed in the lab.

  • If pressed for time, instructors may skip material on communications systems.

Course Assessment:

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Outcomes 1&3: Traditional exams covering lecture material

  • Outcomes 1&3: Assignment of quantitative design and analysis problems involving more complex applications of fundamental models

  • Outcomes 1&3: Operational circuit analysis using circuit performance data

Course Coordinator:

Gerry Cano, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer, New Kensington Campus (gxc15@psu.edu)


EET 211 – Microprocessors

Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2004)

Catalog Description:

211: Microprocessors

(3 credits). A study of machine language programming, architecture, and interfacing for microprocessor-based systems emphasizing engineering applications of microprocessors and micro-controllers.

Course prerequisites: EET117.

Goals of the Course:

Microprocessors is a required course for sophomore-level students in the Electrical Engineering Technology program. The purpose of this course to teach students the fundamentals of microprocessor and microcontroller systems. The student will be able to incorporate these concepts into their electronic designs for other courses where control can be achieved via a microprocessor/controller implementation. Although assembly language programming is a large component of the course, this course is extremely hardware-oriented.  Students will comprehend the basic requirements and layout for building a micro-computer and applying those concepts to achieve a dedicated “embedded” controller as a component of a larger system. Much of the experiments will be using a laboratory trainers based on the instructor choice of processor. Real world control problems will be solved as applications of embedded controllers, as outlined in the laboratory exercises.

Relationship to EET Program Outcomes:

EET 211 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:

  • Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic controllers. (Outcome 1)

  • Students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of drafting and computer usage, including the use of one or more computer software packages for technical problem solving. (Outcome 4)

  • Students should be able to apply creativity through the use of project-based work to the design of circuits, systems or processes. (Outcome 10)

Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:

Outcome 1:

  • Students should be able to solve basic binary math operations.

  • Students should be able to demonstrate programming proficiency using the various addressing modes and data transfer instructions of the target microprocessor.

  • Students should be able to program using the capabilities of the stack, the program counter, and the status register and show how these are used to execute a machine code program.

Outcome 4:

  • Students should be able to apply knowledge of the microprocessor’s internal registers and operations by use of a PC based microprocessor simulator.

  • Students should be able to write and assemble assembly language programs for the target microprocessor using a cross assembler utility.

  • Students should be able to download machine code programs to a microprocessor/controller board using a terminal emulation program, such as “hyper-terminal” on the PC.


Outcome 10:

  • Students should be able to design electrical circuitry to the Microprocessor I/O ports in order to interface the processor to the real-world.

  • Students should be able to write assembly language programs and download the machine code that will provide solutions real-world control problems such as fluid level control, temperature control, and batch processes.




Suggested Texts:

The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:

  • The 8051 Microcontroller and Embedded Systems, Mazidi, M.,Prentice Hall.

  • Introduction to the Intel Family of Microprocessors, Antonakos, Prentice Hall. 

  • Microprocessors and Programmed Logic, Short, K.,Prentice Hall.

  • Embedded Microcomputer Systems: Motorola 6811/6812, Valvano,J.,Thomson-Brooks/Cole.

  • The 68HC11 Microcontroller, Greenfield, Saunders College Publications.

  • The 68000 Microprocessor, 5/e, Antonakos, Prentice-Hall

Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:

  • Satisfactory completion of basic digital electronics courses.

  • Ability to convert decimal number into binary, octal, and hexadecimal, and visa versa.

  • Ability to perform arithmetic operations in binary, octal and hexadecimal.

  • Ability to use a computer to prepare written reports and to perform basic data reduction, graphing, and engineering data presentation.

Course Topics:

Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.

Note - One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.

  • Microprocessor system architecture, incl. memory and I/O. (2 hours)

  • Microprocessor programming model. (2 hours)

  • Addressing modes. (3 hours)

  • Program loop constructs - Jump and Branch instructions. (1 hour)

  • Subroutines. (1 hour)

  • Basic math programs - single and multi-byte signed addition & subtraction and unsigned multiplication & division. (4 hours)

  • BCD arithmetic - addition and subtraction. (1 hour)

  • Timing loops. (1 hour)

  • Control, polling and sensing loops. (1 hour)

  • Basic parallel port operation and interfacing (LED's, relays, D/A and A/D, etc). (4 hours)

  • Basic serial port operation and interfacing. (2 hours)

  • Interrupts. (2 hours)

  • Assembly language programming. (4 hours)

  • Overview of other processor families. (1 hour)

  • Overview of special interface circuits such as Disk Controllers, Video Controllers, DMA controllers, etc. (1 hour)

Computer Use:

Students are expected to use the computer to write and assemble assembly language programs and also run them by downloading them to the target micro-processor. Students will also use a microprocessor software simulator that runs on the personal computer. Students will also prepare lab reports and conduct out-of-class assignments using the computer.

Laboratory Exercises:

Laboratory investigations of the following topics would be appropriate for this course:

  • Memory Chips & Systems

  • Analog to Digital and Digital to Analog Conversions

  • Introduction to Using the Processor Board

  • Programming Using Various Addressing Modes

  • Simple Input/Output Interfacing

  • Loops and Decision Making

  • Timers and Interrupts

  • Subroutines &Structured Programming

  • Arithmetic and Logical Instruction Programming

  • Project

Required Equipment:

The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:

  • A suitable micro-processor trainer or development board using the target microprocessor

  • Dual trace oscilloscopes

  • Digital multi-meters

  • Adjustable, multi-output DC power supplies

  • Appropriate integrated circuits to build memory systems, I/O interfacing, and other electronic components

  • Suitable prototyping boards or electronic trainers




Course Grading:

Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.

Library Usage:

Students should be encouraged to use library technical resources and/or internet sources in the preparation of laboratory and oral reports. Also students should be encouraged to conduct research in alternate microprocessors not used in the course to enhance their understanding and sharpen their research skills. The results of this research can be presented either orally or by written report.

Course Assessment

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Outcome 1 : Traditional exams, quizzes and out-of-class problem assignments covering lecture materials generally can be used to assess these outcome.

  • Outcome 4: Computer files of assembly language and compiled machine code programs included in formal laboratory reports and/or comprehensive research-based projects. These reports, both written and oral utilize available computer based applications are effective methods of demonstrating achievement of this outcome.




  • Outcome 10: Team-based assignments (viz. in lab exercises) in which success (i.e., team-based rather than individually-based grades) requires are effective student interaction and effective work-load sharing can be useful for assessing success with respect to this outcome.




Course Coordinator:

Kenneth Dudeck, Associate Professor of Engineering, Hazleton Campus (ked2@psu.edu)


EET 213W – Fundamentals of Electrical Machines Using Writing Skills

Standard Course Outline (Updated – Fall 2004)

Catalog Description:

213W: Fundamentals of Electrical Machines Using Writing Skills

(5 credits). AC and DC machinery principles and applications; introduction to magnetic circuits, transformers, and electrical machines, including laboratory applications. Prerequisites: Engl 015, EET114.

Goals of the Course:

Fundamentals of Electrical Machines Using Writing Skills is a required course for sophomore-level students in the Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) associate degree program. The purpose of the course is to teach principles of AC and DC motors and generators, and AC transformers and how they work. Basic concepts of electromagnetic circuits as they relate to voltages, currents, and physical forces induced in conductors are covered, including application to practical problems of machine design. Practical analytical models for most types of motors, generators, and transformers commonly used in industry are developed, and the models are used to analyze power requirements, power capability, efficiency, operating characteristics, control requirements, and electrical demands of these machines. EET 213W is also a "writing-intensive" course that teaches students to prepare formal, written technical documents. This goal is accomplished through extensive writing exercises performed in the context of laboratory exercises that accompany the course.

Relationship to EET Program Outcomes:

EET 213W contributes to the following EET program outcomes:

  • Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic controllers. (Outcome 1)

  • Students should be able to apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering concepts to technical problem solving. (Outcome 3)

  • Students should be able to communicate effectively orally, visually, and in writing. (Outcome 5)

  • Students should be able to work effectively in teams. (Outcome 6)

  • Students should understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities. (Outcome 7)

  • Students should have a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement. (Outcome 11)

Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:

Outcome 1:

  • Students will be able to use standard testing procedures to correctly determine the transformer equivalent circuit model and will be able to use the model to predict performance characteristics of single-phase transformers, 3-phase transformers, and auto-transformers.

  • Students will be able to use standard testing procedures to correctly determine the equivalent circuit modeling parameters and performance characteristics of single-phase and 3-phase AC induction machines.

  • Students will be able to understand and interpret the national standards (such as NEMA) used for classification of AC induction machines in the context of motor selection and performance characteristics (torque vs. slip curves).

  • Students will be able to apply electrical equivalent circuit models to correctly determine performance characteristics of 3-phase synchronous motors.

  • Students will be able to apply electrical equivalent circuit models to correctly determine performance characteristics of 3-phase synchronous generators in the context of large AC electrical power grids.

  • Students will be able to apply electrical equivalent circuit models to correctly determine performance characteristics of shunt and series DC motors.

  • Students will understand the fundamental control practices associated with AC and DC machines (starting, reversing, braking, plugging, jogging etc.)


Outcome 3:

  • Students will use concepts in trigonometry, complex algebra, and phasors to find quantitative solutions to electrical machine problems described in Outcome 1.


Outcome 5:

  • Students will use standard word-processing and mathematical analysis software to prepare professional quality written reports documenting laboratory investigations of electromechanical devices.

  • Students will prepare professional quality graphical presentations of laboratory data, including appropriate data analysis and synthesis.

  • Students will be able to prepare professional quality graphical and tabular presentations of mathematical computations obtained from various machine investigations performed using standard electrical models (see Outcomes 1 &3).

  • Students will use suitable visual and graphic aids to prepare and give professional quality presentations on technical subjects to groups of faculty and peers.

Outcome 6:

  • Students will work in multi-person teams to conduct experimental exercises, analyze the results, and develop technically-sound and logical reports of the outcomes.

Outcome 7:

  • Primarily via team-based laboratory activities, students will demonstrate the ability to interact effectively on a social and interpersonal level with fellow students.

  • Primarily via team-based laboratory activities, students will demonstrate the ability to divide up and share task responsibilities to complete team-based assignments.

Outcome 11:

  • Primarily via writing assignments required in “W” courses, students will demonstrate the ability to generate, according to a prescribed timetable, repetitive revisions of written assignments of increasing quality.

Suggested Texts:

The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:

  • Hubert, Electrical Machines-Theory, Operation, Applications, & Control, Prentice Hall.

  • Sen, Principles of Electric Machines & Power Electronics, Wiley

  • Ryff, Electric Machinery, Prentice Hall

  • Pearman, Electrical Machinery & Transformer Technology, Saunders

  • Guru, Electric Machinery & Transformers, Oxford University Press

  • Wildi, Electrical Machines, Drives, and Power Systems, Prentice Hall

  • Fitzerald, Kingsley, and Umans, Electric Machinery, 6/e, McGraw-Hill

The following are useful references for this course:

  • Kosow, Electric Machinery and Control, Prentice-Hall

  • Siskind, Electrical Machines, McGraw-Hill

  • Chapman, Electric Machinery Fundamentals, McGraw-Hill

Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:

  • Satisfactory completion of basic circuits courses, including AC circuit concepts.

  • Ability to use a computer to prepare written reports and to perform basic data reduction, graphing, and engineering data presentation.

  • Basic understanding of algebra, trigonometry, complex numbers, and phasors.

Course Topics:

Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.

Note - One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class. 14 week semester allows 56 hours total.

  • Magnetics: field properties, materials, hysteresis & saturation, magnetic circuits, induction, motor & generator action. (3 hours)

  • Transformers: construction, ideal & practical models, polarity, impedance, parameter testing, regulation, efficiency, ratings, parallel operation & load sharing. (7 hours)

  • Specialty transformers: auto, 3φ, and instrument transformers. (2 hours)

  • 3φ Induction Motors: construction, synchronous speed & slip, rotor & stator circuit models, developed & output power, torque, efficiency, torque-speed curves, classification standards, stall & starting torque, parameter measurement, starting methods, reversing, plugging. (13 hours)

  • 1φ Induction Motors: quadrature fields &/or rotating field theory, starting methods, torque equations. (2 hours)

  • Specialty Motors: brushless DC, stepper, hysteresis, and reluctance motors. (2 hours)

  • Synchronous Motors: construction, operating concepts, starting methods, torque & torque angle, armature reaction, circuit models & phasor diagrams, V-curves, power factor control, pull-out torque, parameter testing, losses & efficiency. (8 hours)

  • Synchronous Generators: motor-generator transition, phasor diagrams, synchronizing, power factor control, voltage regulation, operation on infinite grid. (8 hours)

  • DC Machines: commutation, shunt, series, and compound motor models, developed power & torque, losses & efficiency, starting, braking, and speed control. (8 hours)

  • In-class examinations (3 hours)

Computer Use:

Students are expected to use computers both to prepare lab reports and conduct some out-of-class assignments. Computers will be used to analyze lab data, prepare engineering graphs for reports, and perform analytic studies of transformer, motor, and generator performance. Knowledge of word-processing, spreadsheet, and mathematical analysis software (viz., Mathcad, Matlab, TKSolver, etc.) is required.

Laboratory Exercises:

Typical laboratory exercises should include the following:

  • Transformer basics (V-I relationships, polarity testing, voltage regulation)

  • Autotransformers (kVA amplification, step-up & step-down operation) or 3-phase transformers (Constructing 3-phase banks from single-phase transformers, wye/delta connections)

  • 3φ squirrel-cage (or wound-rotor) induction motor performance (reversing, torque-speed curves, start & stall torque, efficiency, power factor, & effects of rotor resistance)

  • Single-phase induction motor performance (starting & running torque, power factor)

  • Synchronous motor performance (start & pull-out torque, power factor ctrl, V-curves)

  • Synchronous alternator performance (synchronizing, regulation, power factor ctrl)

  • Shunt, series, & compound DC motor performance

  • DC motor starting methods / controls

Required Equipment:

The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:

  • AC and DC voltage, current, and 1φ and 3φ power meters

  • 1φ power transformers (1kVA or larger recommended)

  • 3φ squirrel-cage induction motors (0.25kW or larger recommended)

  • 1φ induction motors (split-phase, capacitor-start & -run, universal recommended)

  • 3φ synchronous motor/generators (0.25kW or larger recommended)

  • Rotary dynamometer or prony brake appropriate for measuring motor torque

  • Tachometers

  • Resistive, capacitive, and inductive 3φ loads suitable for generator outputs

The following equipment is also useful:

  • 3φ wound-rotor induction motors (0.25kW or larger recommended)

  • Transformers with buck-boost and T-connections

  • Phase angle meters

  • Watt-var meters

  • DC motor starters

  • SCR speed controllers

  • Synchroscope or synchronizing lamps

Course Grading:

Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor with the stipulation that at least 25% of the course grade must be determined from the writing component (see following item)..

Communication Skills:

The "W" designation on this course means that writing assignments must be a fundamental part of the course. This goal is most easily met by requiring lab reports to be formal, written reports. The reports must follow an accepted technical writing style and must be concise, technically correct, and grammatically sound. Reports must be prepared using a word processor and printed in an accepted professional format. As required by the University "W" designation, (1) grading of written exercises will give comparable weight to grammatical quality and technical merit, and (2) grades on written material will represent at least 25% of the class grade.

The "W" designation also requires that this course teach students good oral communication skills. Therefore, the course also requires students to prepare and present oral reports of their technical work. Reports are graded, and these grades are included in the overall class grade.

Library Use/Research Requirements:

Students should be required to use library technical resources and electronic-based data sources in the preparation of at least one lab/research report assigned in this course.

Course Assessment

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Outcomes 1 & 3: Traditional exams and out-of-class problem assignments covering lecture materials generally can be used to assess these outcomes.

  • Outcomes 5, 6 & 11: Formal laboratory reports and/or comprehensive research-based projects, created using any of a variety of typical professional formats (research/test report, business letter, technical memo, lab notebook, etc.), accompanied by oral presentation of results, are effective methods of demonstrating achievement of this outcome.

  • Outcome 7: Team-based assignments (viz. in lab exercises) in which success (i.e., team-based rather than individually-based grades) requires are effective student interaction and effective work-load sharing can be useful for assessing success with respect to this outcome.

Course Coordinator:

Todd Batzel, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, Altoona College

(tdb120@psu.edu)


EET 216 - Linear Electronic Circuits
Standard Course Outline (Updated Fall 2004)



Catalog Data:

216: Linear Electronic Circuits
(3 credits) Theoretical study of linear electronic devices and circuits, including field effect transistors, frequency response of amplifiers. Prerequisites: EET210.

Goals of the Course:

Linear Electronic Circuits The goal of the course is to teach students to analyze and design small signal and power amplifiers and power supplies using electronic devices such as diodes, transistors and integrated circuits.  Students will also learn to analyze MOSFETS, diacs, thyristors, and triacs.

Relationship of EET Program Outcomes:

EET 216 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:

  • Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic controllers (Outcome 1)

  • Students should be able to apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering concepts to technical problem solving (Outcome 3)

Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the program are:

Outcome 1:

  • Students will understand the effect of operating point on the performance of BJT and FET amplifiers and be able to select and design for proper bias.

  • Students will understand the small signal operation of BJT and FET amplifiers and be able to analyze operation.

  • Students will understand the concept of frequency response and be able to develop a Bodie plot for a given circuit.

Outcome 3:

  • Students will apply concepts in algebra in conjunction with network theorems to simplify and quantitatively analyze electronic circuits containing bipolar or field effect transistors.

  • Students will apply concepts in algebra and complex algebra in conjunction with fundamental electronic laws to quantitatively analyze electronic circuits containing bipolar or field effect transistors.

  • Students will be able to construct Bodie plots to depict amplifier frequency response.

Suggested Text:

Floyd, Fundamental of Linear Circuits, Merrill.

Alternate Texts:

  • Floyd, Electronic Devices, Merrill

  • Malvino, Electronic Principles , McGraw-Hill

  • Leach, Discrete and Integrated Circuit Electronics , Saunders

  • Boylestad & Nasheslky, Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, Prentice-Hall

Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering the course:

  • Basic characteristics of diodes, transistors, FETs, and op-amps

  • Characteristics of linear voltage, current, resistance, and conductance amplifiers

  • Concepts of feedback in amplifier circuits

  • Operation, analysis, and design of practical linear and specialty non-linear circuits using op-amps

  • Basics of filter and oscillator circuits

Course Topics:

Suggested topical coverage by weeks [Chap. references for Floyd text]:

  1. Review of diodes, diode applications (rectifiers & filters) [1-5 to 1-7 & 2-1 to 2-3]

  2. Limiters, clampers, multipliers, specialty diodes [2-4 & 2-8]

  3. Review of BJTs and BJT biasing [3-1 to 3-3]

  4. Review of FETs and FET biasing [3-6 to 3-9]
    Test I

  5. Small-signal BJT amplifers (CE, CB, and CC designs) [4-1 to 4-3]

  6. Small-signal FET amplifiers (CS, CD, and CG designs) [4-4]

  7. Power amplifiers [4-6 to 4-8]

  8. Review and test II

  9. Lead-lag networks, half-power response, dB notation [notes supplied by instructor]

  10. Low frequency response of BJT and JFET amplifiers, Bode plots [notes supplied by instructor]

  11. Miller's theorem, high frequency response of amplifiers [notes supplied by instructor]

  12. Review and test III

  13. Diacs, thyristors, and triac applications [3-11 & notes supplied by instructor]

  14. Review of op amp amplifers and power supply circuits [7-1 to 7-2 & 10-1, 10-5]

  15. Review for final exam

Calculator Use:

Students are expected to own and know how to use a scientific calculator, such as the TI-85/86 or equivalent.

Computer Use:

Students are expected to use PSPICE for Windows, Electronics Workbench, or equivalent software, especially for calculating and presenting the frequency response of amplifiers as well as MOSFETS. EET 216 students should also be enrolled in the associated lab, EET 221.  EET 221 should be taught by the same instructor.

Course Assessment:

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Outcomes 1&3: Traditional exams covering lecture material

  • Outcomes 1&3: Assignment of quantitative design and analysis problems involving more complex applications of fundamental models

  • Outcomes 1&3: Operational circuit analysis using circuit performance data

Course Coordinator:

Gerry Cano, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer, New Kensington Campus (gxc15@psu.edu)
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