Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1




НазваниеAppendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1
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EET 120 – Digital Electronics Laboratory

Standard Course Outline (Updated – Sept. 2004)

Catalog Description:

120: Digital Electronics

(1 credit). Laboratory study of solid-state pulse, digital, industrial, and motor control circuits. Prerequisite: EET109. Concurrent EET117.

Goals of the Course:

Digital Electronics Laboratory is a required course for freshman students in the Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) associate degree program. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an understanding of how to analyze, build, and troubleshoot digital circuits. Student should become proficient in using oscilloscopes, signal analyzers, and similar equipment to test digital circuits. In addition students must learn to write well-organized reports using a word processor. Students must learn to apply PSPICE for Windows (or similar programs) to evaluate the potential performance of these circuits. Students should also learn current technologies in the area of programmable memories.

Relationship to EET Program Outcomes:

EET 120 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:

  • Students should be able to conduct experiments, and then analyze and interpret results. (Outcome 2)

  • Students should be able to communicate effectively orally, visually, and in writing. (Outcome 5)

  • Students should be able to apply creativity through the use of project-based work to the design of circuits, systems or processes. (Outcome 10)




Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the EET program outcomes are:

Outcome 2:

  • Students will demonstrate that theoretical device/circuit operation can be implemented in properly constructed digital circuits.

  • Students will be able to correctly operate standard electronic test equipment such as oscilloscopes, signal analyzers, digital multi-meters, power supplies, frequency meters, and programmable memories programmers to analyze, test, and implement digital circuits.

  • Students will be able to correctly analyze a circuit and compare its theoretical performance to actual performance.

  • Students will be able to apply troubleshooting techniques to test digital circuits.

Outcome 5:

  • Students will be able to prepare and present an organized written engineering report on electronic testing of digital circuits.



Outcome 10:


  • Students will demonstrate proficiency in digital circuits analysis and design methods by designing, implementing, and testing project-based digital circuits.



Suggested Texts:

The following are suitable texts for this course:

  • Michael Wiesner. Digital Electronics. A practical Approach, Prentice Hall.

  • Patrick Kane. Xilinx Laboratory Manual to accompany Cook’s Digital Electronics with PLD Integration, Prentice Hall.



The following are useful reference for this course:

  • Roy W. Goody. OrCAD PSPICE for Windows. 3rd Ed. Prentice Hall

Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:

  • Understanding of voltage, current, resistance and fundamentals of DC circuits.

  • Basic understanding of algebra.




Course Topics:

The listed below laboratory exercises should be considered as suggested topics to be supplemented or modified by locally developed exercises:



  • Introduction to laboratory and review of lab policies

  • IC families, TTL electrical characteristics

  • DeMorgan’s theorem

  • Logic circuit simplification

  • Design of combinational circuit

  • Introduction to flip-flops

  • Application of flip-flops

  • Memory systems

  • Programmable logic

  • Final project presentations

Computer Use:

  • Students are expected to use PSPICE for Windows, Electronic Workbench, or equivalent software for the purpose of analysis and design of digital circuits.

  • Students should learn how to implement a design using programmable logic (specific hardware and software tools depend on local availability.)

Required Equipment:

The following is the minimum list of the equipment and devices required to conduct this course:

  • Oscilloscope

  • Digital training board

  • IC Discrete chips

  • Universal Programmer and/or PLD board

  • Window-based PC

Course Grading:

Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor. However, the mixture of informal and formal lab reports is recommended. Part of the laboratory work should include a final project accompanied by oral presentation and written report. A suggested grading strategy is:

  • Formal reports – 30%

  • Informal reports – 30%

  • Lab work and participation – 10%

  • Lab project – 30%

Comments & Suggestions:

Course Assessment


The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Outcome 2, 5, 10: Student completion and instructor grading of laboratory experiments.

  • Outcome 5, 10: Student design and preparation of the laboratory testing procedures. Team-based assignments, which necessitate effective communication and good time management, can be useful in evaluation of team success.




Course Coordinator:

Andrzej J. Gapinski, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Engineering, Fayette Campus

(ajg2@psu.edu)


EET 205 - Semiconductor Laboratory
Standard Course Outline (Updated Fall 2004)



Catalog Data:

205: Semiconductor Laboratory
(1 credit). Use of electrical instruments to test and measure linear devices. Introduction to report writing. Prerequisite EET109 and concurrent: EET210.

Goals of the Course:

Semiconductor Laboratory is a required course for sophomore students in the Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) associate degree program. The purpose of the course is to teach students how to build circuits based primarily on operational amplifiers and how to use digital multimeters, signal generators, frequency meters and oscilloscopes to test these circuits.. In addition, students must learn to write well organized reports using a word processor. Lastly, they must learn to apply PSPICE for Windows (or equivalent software) to evaluate the potential performance of these circuits with the aid of a computer.

Relationship of EET Program Outcomes:

EET 205 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:

  • Students should be able to conduct experiments and then analyze and interpret results. (Outcome 2)

  • Students should be able to communicate effectively orally, visually and in writing. (Outcome 5)

  • Students should be able to apply creativity through the use of project-based work to the design of circuits, systems or processes. (Outcome 10)

Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the program are:

Outcome 2:

  • Students will demonstrate that theoretical device operation can be achieved in properly constructed circuits.

  • Students will be able to construct breadboard or prototype circuits.

  • Students will be able to use standard electronic test equipment such as oscilloscopes, function generators, digital multimeters, power supplies, and frequency counters.

  • Students will be able to analyze a circuit and compare theoretical performance to actual performance.

Outcome 5:

  • Students will be able to present an organized written engineering analysis on electronic testing of a circuit.

Outcome 10:

  • Using both device theoretical performance knowledge and analytical skills, students will be able to design formal test procedures that exercise and test circuit performance capabilities to demonstrate relationship to required performance.

Suggested Text:

The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:

  1. Berlin, Experiments in Electronic Devices, Prentice-Hall.

  2. Goody, PSPICE for Windows, A Circuit Simulation Primer, Prentice-Hall.

The instructor may need to supplement any of the above with notes and handouts.

Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering the course:

  • Basic arithmetic, algebra and trigonometry.

Computer Use:

Students are expected to use electronic simulation software (PSPICE, Electronics Workbench, etc.) to evaluate linear device circuits, and to use word processing software to write all reports.

Laboratory Exercises:

Weekly lab exercises listed below are from the Berlin book. Exercise numbers are indicated. (This listing is provided as only a guide to lab exercises that might be covered in this course. All may be supplemented by locally developed exercises.)

  1. Introduction to lab and review of lab policies

  2. The Diode (1)

  3. Transistor Base Biasing (9)

  4. The JFET Drain Curve (19)

  5. Op-Amp Slew Rate (30)

  6. Inverting and Non-Inverting Amplifiers (32)

  7. Inverting and Non-Inverting Amplifiers, cont'd (32)

  8. Op-Amp Comparators (33)

  9. Op-Amp Integrator and Differentiator (34)

  10. Low-Pass Active Filter (35)

  11. High-Pass Active Filter (36)

  12. 555 Timer Circuit (40)

  13. IC Voltage Regulator (43)

  14. Project Presentations

  15. Project Presentations, cont'd

Required Equipment:

The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:

  • DMM

  • Dual-trace oscilloscope

  • Signal generator

  • Frequency counter

  • Dual-output, variable DC power supply

  • Breadboard and miscellaneous components

  • Windows-based PC capable of running PSPICE or equivalent software

The following equipment is also useful:

  • Digital scope

  • Data acquisition system

Course Grading:

Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor. It is recommended that the students produce at least three detailed lab reports and a written and oral report on a final project. The final project is built by the students from scratch at their own expense, including soldering components and putting it all in a case with a battery supply, from a circuit supplied by the instructor. For example, there are simple op-amp and other circuits available in Radio Shack and other project books.

Comments & Suggestions:

  • The same person should teach EET 205 and EET 210.

  • The instructor should blend calculator use and electronic simulation evaluations of circuits into laboratory reports.

Course Assessment:

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Student completion and instructor grading of experiments from laboratory manuals.

  • Student design and preparation of a laboratory testing procedure.

Course Coordinator:

Gerry Cano, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer, New Kensington Campus (gxc15@psu.edu)
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