Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1




НазваниеAppendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1
страница6/25
Дата11.09.2012
Размер1.01 Mb.
ТипДокументы
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   25



EET 117 – Digital Electronics

Standard Course Outline (Updated – Sept. 2004)

Catalog Description:

117: Digital Electronics

(3 credits). Fundamentals of digital circuits, including logic circuits, Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, counters, and registers.  Prerequisite: EET101.

Goals of the Course:

Digital Electronics is a required course for freshman students in the Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) associate degree program. The purpose of the course is to teach principles of digital electronics. The material covers a variety of topics including Boolean algebra, basic gates, logic circuits, flip-flops, registers, arithmetic circuits, counters, interfacing with analog devices, and computer memory.

Relationship to EET Program Outcomes:

EET 117 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:

  • Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic controllers. (Outcome 1)

Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the EET program outcomes are:

Outcome 1:

  • Students will be able to represent numerical values in various number systems and perform number conversions.

  • Students will be able to perform the three basic logic operations: AND, OR, NOT.

  • Students will be able to perform analysis of combinational logic circuits containing AND, NAND, OR, NOT, NOR, EX-OR, EX-NOR gates.

  • Students will be able to write Boolean expression for the logic gates and combinations of logic gates.

  • Students will demonstrate the proficiency in simplifying of complex Boolean expressions.

  • Students will be able to use DeMorgan’s theorems to simplify logic expressions.

  • Students will be able to draw and analyze the timing diagrams for logic-circuits.

  • Students will be able to implement a circuit represented by a Boolean expression.

  • Students will be able to draw and interpret the IEEE/ANSI standard logic-gate symbols.

  • Students will be able to use Boolean algebra and the Karnaugh map as tools to simplify and design combinational logic circuits.

  • Students will be able to cite the basic characteristics of TTL and CMOS digital ICs.

  • Students will be able to analyze and build the basic arithmetic circuits: half adder, full adder, 3-bit adder, 3-bit multiplier, etc.

  • Students will demonstrate the knowledge of operation of flip-flops, registers, and counters.

  • Students will demonstrate the operation of decoders, encoders, multiplexers, and de-multiplexers.

  • Students will be able to analyze and design digital combinational circuits using standard analysis and design methods.

  • Students will demonstrate the understanding of sequential digital circuit analysis methods.

  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of the nomenclature and technology in the area of memory devices: ROM, RAM, PROM, PLD, FPGAs, etc.




Suggested Texts:

The following are suitable texts for this course:

  • R.J. Tocci., N.S.Widmer, G.L. Moss. Digital Systems, Principles and Applications, Pearson/Prentice Hall.

  • T.L.Floyd. Digital Fundamentals, 8th Ed. Prentice Hall.      

  • N.P. Cook. Practical Digital Electronics, Pearson/Prentice Hall.

  • W. Kleitz. Digital Electronics. A Practical Approach. Prentice Hall.

  • W. Kleitz. Digital Electronics with VHDL, Pearson/Prentice Hall.

  • Thomas Floyd. Digital Fundamentals with VHDL, Prentice Hall.



The following are useful references for this course:

  • R.K. Dueck. Digital Design with CPLD Applications and VHDL, Delmar.

  • Roy W. Goody. OrCAD PSPICE for Windows. 3rd Ed. Prentice Hall




Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:

  • Understanding of voltage, current, resistance and fundamentals of DC circuits.

  • Basic understanding of algebra.




Course Topics:

Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.

Note - One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.

  • Unsigned number systems including decimal, binary, octal, hex and base conversion. (3 class hours)

  • Codes - BCD, Gray, ASCII and parity. (1 class hour)

  • Basic digital logic gates (AND / OR) and truth tables. (2 class hours)

  • Boolean Algebra - Postulate and theorems, equation reductions and circuit implementations. (5 class hours)

  • DeMorgan’s theorems - NAND and NOR gates and implementation. (1 class hour)

  • Sum of Product circuits. (1 class hour)

  • Karnaugh map and circuit simplification. (3 class hours)

  • Multiplexers, demultiplexers, decoders and other MSI circuits. (3 class hours)

  • Basic SR Flip-Flops - NAND & NOR implementations and limitations. (1 class hour)

  • D Latch, Clocked and Edge Triggered D Flip-Flops. (2 class hours)

  • Edge Triggered JK Flip-Flop. (1 class hours)

  • One Shot Multivibrators and 555 type timers. (2 class hour)

  • Ripple Counter. (1 class hour)

  • Sequential Logic - Synchronous Counters, Shift Registers and basic State Machine concepts. (6 class hours)

  • Memory Systems - RAM, ROM, PROM, EPROM etc. (3 class hours)

  • Programmable Logic - an extension of the PROM - PAL, PLA, and other PLD devices. FPGAs. (6 class hours)

Computer Use:

Students are expected to use PSPICE for Windows, Electronic Workbench, or equivalent software for the purpose of analysis and design of digital circuits.

Laboratory Exercises:

None. There is an accompanying laboratory course EET120

Required Equipment:

None. The following equipment can be used by an instructor for demonstration purposes:

  • Digital training board

  • Digital Analyzer

  • PLD programmer

  • FPGA board

Course Grading:

Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.

Course Assessment

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcome listed above (outcome 1):

  • Traditional exams covering lecture material

  • Assignment of quantitative design and analysis problems involving digital circuits

  • A library-based research project, with accompanying written and oral presentation of results, to examine history, design, operation, or application of digital devices/circuits.

Course Coordinator:

Andrzej J. Gapinski, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Engineering, Fayette Campus

(ajg2@psu.edu)


EET 118 - Electrical Circuits II Laboratory
Standard Course Outline (Updated Spring 2003)

Catalog Description:

EET 118 -Electrical Circuits II Laboratory
(1 credit) Continuation of EET 109 with emphasis on student familiarization with basic electrical instruments and report writing.  Prerequisite: EET 109.  Concurrent EET 114

Goals of the Course:

Electrical Circuits II Laboratory continues the student experience in the electrical laboratory. Students will use various electrical test instruments to measure voltage, current, power, etc. in DC and AC circuits.  The experiments in this course will demonstrate empirically the concepts introduced in the companion lecture course, EET 114.  Report writing will be an integral part of the course.

Relationship to [insert program abbreviation here] Program Outcomes:

EET 118 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:

  • Conduct experiments, and then analyze and interpret results.(Outcome 2)

  • Work effectively in teams.(Outcome 6)

Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:

Outcome 2:

  • Students will be able to construct circuits correctly by following the laboratory experimental procedure.

  • Students will be able to correctly measure and successfully troubleshoot circuits by taking accurate data and interpret results.


Outcome 6:

  • Students will be able to work as team members during various phases of implementing, troubleshooting and analyzing experimental exercises.

Suggested Texts:

The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:

  • Boylestad/Kousourou, Experiments in Circuit Analysis, , Prentice Hall

  • Gauss, EET 118 Circuits Laboratory Guide, Penn State Bookstore

  • Lab Exercise Set for EET 118, Penn State Printing Services

Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:

  • Student must have previous electrical lab experience.  This would most likely be in EET 109.

  • Student should have taken (or be taking) EET 114.

  • Knowledge of PSPICE or other computer circuit analysis software.

  • Student should have lab report writing experience.  Word processing skills are also desirable.

Computer Use:

Students should have been introduced to PSPICE or similar software for solving DC and AC circuits in previous courses.  The Boylestad text introduces PSPICE at an introductory level.  The other texts cover similar circuit solution techniques.  At least one lab exercise should be devoted to the use of circuit simulation software to solve DC and/or AC circuits.

Laboratory Exercises:

Laboratory investigations of the following would be appropriate for this course:

  • Mesh and Node Analysis

  • Thevenin’s Theorem and Maximum Power Transfer

  • Superposition

  • Norton’s Theorem and Source Conversions

  • Graphical analysis of circuits

  • RC transient analysis

  • RL transient analysis

  • Phasor analysis

  • Series Resonant Circuits

  • Parallel Resonant Circuits

  • Current and voltage in Balanced Three- Phase Systems

Required Equipment:

The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:

  • Analog voltmeters and ammeters

  • Digital Multimeter

  • Dual-trace oscilloscope

  • Signal generator

  • Frequency counter

  • Dual-output, variable DC power supply

  • Breadboard and miscellaneous components

  • Windows-based PC capable of running PSPICE or equivalent software

Course Grading:

Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.

Library Usage:

Students should be encouraged to use library technical resources in the preparation of laboratory and oral reports. At the instructor’s discretion, one or more oral reports may be incorporated in this class to enhance students’ oral presentation skills. When possible, these activities should involve a significant component of library research into topics covered by the course, which would encourage and enhance students’ research skills.

Course Assessment

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Outcomes 2 and 6: Record of laboratory experiments performance and laboratory examination can be used to assess these outcomes.

Course Coordinator:

Maryam Ghorieshi, Instructor of Engineering, Hazleton Campus
mxg32@psu.edu
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   25

Похожие:

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix b – hibernacula: forest habitat analysis 98 appendix c – literature cited 101

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconDraft appendix a appendix a documents to for accreditation

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix 4 university of pretoria format of curriculum vitae

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconA comprehensive Emergency Management Program Part II appendix E

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix a1

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix L

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix 1 – References

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconSupplementary Appendix

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix User Bibliography

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix User Bibliography

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница