Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1




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5. Faculty

6. Facilities

7. Institutional & External Support

  1. Size, expertise, breadth, currency, and balance of the faculty are an excellent match for the student population, program objectives and outcomes;

  2. Respected and effective program leadership provided by full time faculty member;

  3. Faculty fully engaged in professional development, and has extensive authority and responsibility for program objectives and success.




  1. All teaching and learning facilities modern, matched to program needs;

  2. Lab and computing equipment, supplies, and software clearly represents that used in stakeholder industries;

  3. Information resources readily accessible, and completely meet the needs of faculty and students.




    1. Administration is widely recognized for leadership and dependability for sound budgets

    2. The budgeting process includes generous allocations to attract, retain & develop faculty;

    3. Equipment and facilities serving the program are current, well maintained, and integral to the institutions long range planning;

    4. Dependable advising, reliable course offerings, and successful placement services exist;

    5. An advisory group with employer reps, meets regularly, and systematically guides the program.

  1. Faculty is qualified, reasonably current in their fields, and is adequate for program objectives and outcomes;

  2. Good program leadership provided by full time faculty member;

  3. Most faculty members participate in some professional development, and assume responsibility for program success.

  1. Good teaching and learning facilities adequate for program needs;

  2. Lab and computing equipment, supplies, and software generally represent those used in stakeholder industries;

Appropriate variety of information resources are accessible, and meet the needs of faculty and students.

  1. Administration has a fair budgeting process;

  2. Budgets normally include funding for needed faculty hiring and professional development;

  3. Equipment, facilities, and maintenance are adequate;

  4. Course schedules and student services are adequate;

  5. An advisory group includes employers, and meets regularly to review the program and its objectives.




  1. Faculty is qualified, diverse, reasonably current technically, and is effective in its role to meet program objectives and outcomes;

  2. Adequate program leadership provided by full time faculty member;

  3. Faculty somewhat active in professional development, and has some responsibility for program success.




  1. Facilities are reasonable for the program needs;

  2. Lab and computing equipment, supplies, and software adequate, but marginally represent those used in stakeholder industries;

  3. Information resources available to meet most of the needs of faculty and students.

  1. The budget process is informal, but the existing budget is sufficient to operate the program;

  2. Budget for faculty support and development is minimal, with no obvious planning ;

  3. Equipment and facilities are marginal;

  4. Course schedules and student services are minimal;

  5. An advisory group, with little external input meets infrequently, and guidance is informal.




  1. Faculty members are marginally qualified, or have inappropriate qualifications for the program. Perhaps too few for the student body size;

  2. Leadership is marginal, perhaps assigned part time;

  3. Faculty seldom engages in professional development, and has little authority over program success.

  1. Facilities limited, poorly lit, and classrooms & labs are crowded;

  2. Equipment in short supply, is not current and malfunctions interfere with lab experiments;

  3. Information resources inadequate for students to complete assignments.

  1. Very little evidence of administrative support;

  2. No funds for faculty development;

  3. Facilities, equipment & budget less than adequate;

  4. Student advising, course offerings, and placement services are minimal;

  5. Advisory group rarely meets, and does not impact the program.




Appendix 3: Course Outlines, 2EET & 2MET Common Courses

d

This Appendix contains the following Course Outlines for...


Course Course

Number Title Page No.2

ET 2 Engineering Technology Orientation 100

EE T 101 Electrical Circuits I 102

EE T 109 Electrical Circuits I Laboratory 106

EG T 101 Engineering Graphics Technology 110

EG T 102 Engineering Graphics Technology 112

Insert ET 2 Course Outline here.

EET 101 – Electrical Circuits I

Standard Course Outline (Updated: [Fall 2004])

Catalog Description:

EET 101 – Electrical Circuits I

(3 credits). Fundamental theory of resistance, impedance, current, voltage, power, capacitance and inductance. Direct and alternating current concepts through series/parallel circuits.


Course prerequisites: Math 81 (co-requisite)


Goals of the Course:

Electrical Circuits I is a required course for freshmen students in both the Electrical Engineering Technology (2EET) and Mechanical Engineering Technology (2MET) associate degree programs. The purpose of the course is to teach the fundamentals of both DC and AC series/parallel circuit analysis. Methods of analysis, Branch Current Analysis and Mesh Analysis, are performed on DC circuits. Concepts of voltage, current, power, resistance, capacitance, inductance, impedance, conductance and susceptance are covered

(AC methods of analysis are covered in EET 114.)


Relationship to EET

Program Outcomes:

EET 101 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:


Course Outcomes:


  • Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic controllers.(Outcome 1)




  • Students should be able to apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering concepts to technical problem solving. (Outcome 3)




Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:


Outcome 1

  • For single source circuits, students will correctly calculate total resistance and total impedance as seen by the source as well as compute current(s) and voltage(s) associated with each device in the circuit.




  • For DC multisource circuits, students will correctly compute current(s) using Branch Current Analysis and Mesh Analysis. AC multisource circuits will be covered in EET 114 (Electrical Circuits II).



Outcome 3

  • Students will correctly calculate current, voltage, resistance, impedance and power by applying algebra, complex algebra and to a limited degree geometry and trigonometry to DC and AC quantities. A preprogrammed scientific calculator will be used to solve simultaneous equations and compute impedance in polar and rectangular form.




  • Students will be able to correctly employ the following laws, rules and methods to analyze circuits:




  1. Laws

    1. Ohm’s Law

    2. Kirchhoff’s Current Law

    3. Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law

  2. Rules

    1. Current Divider Rule

    2. Voltage Divider Rule

    3. Series Resistance Rule

    4. Parallel Resistance Rule

  3. Methods of analysis

    1. Branch Current Analysis (DC)

    2. Mesh Analysis (DC)




  • Students will be able to correctly determine electrical resistance, capacitance and inductance, respectively from: resistivity, dielectric permittivity, and core permeability as well as geometric properties of each element.



Suggested Texts:

The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:


  • Boylestad, Introductry Circuit Analysis, Prentice Hall (Text)

  • Bartkowiak, Electric Circuit Analysis, Wiley (Text)

(Supplement with circuit simulator)

  • Floyd, Principles of Electric Circuits, (Text)

  • Alexander and Sadiku, Fundamentals of Electric Circuits, McGraw-Hill




Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:

  • Basic arithmetic and algebra

Course Topics:

Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.

Note - One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.

Chapter and sections shown in brackets are from Boylestad, 10th edition, Introductory Circuit Analysis.

Course Topics: Suggested topical coverage by week (3 hours per each week).


  1. Introduction, Calculator usage, Ohm’s Law, Power and Energy [4.1-4.6]

  2. Resistance [3.1-3.8]

  3. Resistance, Series Circuits [3.9-3.13], [5.1-5.6]

  4. Series Circuits, Parallel Circuits [5.7-5.10], [6.1-6.4]

  5. Parallel Circuits, Series-Parallel Circuits [6.5-6.10], [7.1-7.4]

  6. Methods of Analysis & Selected Topics [DC] [8.1-8.5]

  7. Methods of Analysis and Simulation Method of Analysis [8.6-8.8, and 1.12, Software 4.9, 5.12]

  8. Simulation Method of Analysis (PSPICE) [6.12, 8.9, 8.14]

  9. Capacitors [10.1-10.15] ((Information essential to AC simple circuit analysis, definitions, and one transient calculation))

  10. Inductors [12.1-12.14] ((Information essential to AC simple circuit analysis, definitions, and one transient calculation))

  11. Sinusoidal Alternating Waveforms: generation, definitions, phase, average and rms [13.1-13.8]

  12. The Basic Elements and Phasors (R, L, and C in AC, power, power factor) [14.1-14.5]

  13. The Basic Elements and Phasors (Complex and polar numbers)[14.6-14.12] [14.11 calculator only]

  14. Series and Parallel AC Circuits [15.1-15.6]

  15. Series and Parallel AC Circuits [15.7-15.13]




Calculator Use:

Students are expected to own and learn how to use a scientific calculator.


Computer Use:

Computer Use: Students are expected to use PSPICE, Electronic Workbench or equivalent software to calculate currents, voltage and power in single source and multisource DC circuits. At the instructors discretion this may be performed in EET 109.


Course Grading:

Course Grading: policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.


Comments & Suggestions:

The same person should teach both EET 101 and EET 109.

Every effort should be made to co-ordinate EET 101/109 with Math 81. However some mathematics topics must be covered in EET 101/109. A good calculator, programmed to solve simultaneous equations and capable of handling complex algebra is essential for instructor and students (the same calculator for instructor and student is very desirable). The instructor should include PSPICE (or similar software) and calculator solutions of simultaneous equations into all appropriate topics after the fifth week of the course. The instructor should feel free to change the order in which materials are presented. However, the instructor must cover all of the material listed above. The latest edition of Boylestad-Introductory Circuit Analysis is the recommended text for this course. However, the instructor may select another text if it is at the appropriate level and it covers the required course material.


Course Assessment

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes above:

  • Assessment method #1 Exams (Locally Developed)

  • Assessment method #2 Quizzes (Locally Developed)

  • Assessment method #3 Required Homework Problems (From text)




Course Coordinator:

Richard Snyder, Instructor in Engineering, Altoona College,

rjs17@psu.edu



EET 109 – Electrical Circuits I Laboratory


Standard Course Outline (Updated: Spring 2004)


Catalog Description: 109: electrical Circuits I Laboratory

(1 credit). Use of basic electrical instruments to measure AC and DC Voltage, current, power, resistance. Introduction to report writing.

Course prerequisites: EET 101 (co-requisite)

ET 2 (Co-requisite)


Goals of the Course: Electrical Circuits I Laboratory is a required course for freshmen-level students in both the Electrical Engineering Technology (2EET) and Mechanical Engineering Technology (2 MET) associate degree programs. The purpose of this course is to teach the student the basic requirements for building simple DC/AC series, parallel, and series/parallel circuits. Furthermore, students will employ power supplies as well as measure electrical parameters of current, voltage, resistance and impedance with multimeters and oscilloscopes. In addition, students will learn to write well organized lab reports. Lastly, they must learn the fundamentals of a circuit simulator (such as PSPICE 9.2 LITE), so that they can evaluate DC/AC circuits with the aid of a computer.


Relationship to EET Program Outcomes: EET 109 contributes to the following


EET program outcomes:


  • Students should be able to conduct experiments, and then analyze and interpret data. (outcome2)




  • Students should be able to work effectively in teams. (outcome 6)


Course Outcomes: The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:

Outcome 2:

  • Students will be able to construct and troubleshoot both DC/AC circuits which are simple series combinations of resistance or impedance.




  • Students will be able to construct and troubleshoot both DC/AC circuits which are simple parallel combinations of resistance or impedance.




  • Students will be able to construct and troubleshoot both DC/AC circuits which are simple series/parallel combinations of resistance or impedance.




  • Students will be able to correctly analyze circuit voltage, current, resistance, impedance and power using the laws and rules of circuit analysis for single source circuits.




  • Students will be able to correctly analyze circuit voltage, current, resistance, impedance and power using Branch Current Analysis, Mesh Analysis as well as the laws and rules of circuit analysis for DC multisource circuits.




  • Students will be able to correctly measure, record, tabularize and interpret data measurements of circuit voltage, resistance and impedance utilizing analog and digital multimeters and oscilloscopes.


Course Outcomes: Outcome 6


  • Students will be able to function in a team setting, learning to share the group responsibilities of circuit construction, troubleshooting, data measurement and data presentation (recording data, tabularizing data and graphical presentation of results).




  • Students will be able to correctly employ a circuit simulator (such as PSPICE 9.2 LITE) in solving multisource circuits for DC, RC transient simulation and single source AC simulation.


Suggested Texts: The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:


  • EET 109 DC/AC CIRCUITS I LAB GUIDE, by B.L. GUSS, August 1995. (Text)




  • ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY, EET – 109, LABORATORY EXERCISES, by NIRANJAN S. IDGUNJI, August 1993, (Text) (Supplement with AC experiments.)




  • EXPERIMENTS IN CIRCUIT ANALYSIS TO ACCOMPANY INTRODUCTORY CIRCUIT ANALYSIS, TENTH EDITION, by BOYLESTAD, and KOUSOUROV, 2003, (Text) (Prentice Hall)




  • INTRODUCTORY CIRCUIT ANALYSIS, by Boylestad, 2003, (Prentice Hall) (Reference)


Prerequisites by Topic: Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:


  • Basic Arithmetic

  • Basic Algebra


Computer Use: Pspice simulation of Multisource circuits for DC, RC capacitor transient and single source AC.


Laboratory Exercises: Laboratory investigations of the following circuits would be appropriate for this course:


  1. Course requirements, circuit tracing, color code and ohmmeter

  2. Ohm’s Law.

  3. Resistors in series and parallel circuits.

  4. Series, parallel and series-parallel circuits.

  5. Voltage, current measurements and power calculations

  6. Kirchhoff’s Laws and calculator solutions of simultaneous equations.

  7. Kirchhoff’s Laws and Pspice DC Demonstration.

  8. Capacitors: charging and discharging.

  9. Pspice Transient Demonstration (capacitor).

  10. ,11 Oscilloscope and signal generator (demonstration & Experimentation)

  1. Series RC circuit constant frequency.

  2. Series RC circuit variable frequency.

  3. Series – parallel AC circuit analysis.

  4. Series RLC circuit – constant frequency.

  5. PSPICE AC Demonstration (Final Exam Week).


Required Equipment: The following is the minimum equipment to conduct this course:

  1. Analog Multimeters

  2. Digital Multimeters

  3. Dual Trace Oscilloscopes

  4. Signal Generators

  5. Frequency Counters

  6. Dual Output, variable DC supplies

  7. Windows based PC with windows PSPICE (PSPICE 9.2 LITE)


Course grading: Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.


Course Assessment: The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Assessment Method #1: Laboratory Reports (Required)

Weekly or bi-weekly lab reports written into a prenumbered duplicating notebook. The laboratory reports must possess the six parts as described in the handout entitled “Laboratory Procedures and Reports”. Instructors may later opt to have all students step up to wordprocessed reports with spreadsheet and database software used if the students are proficient in these from the co-requisite ET2. Otherwise, written laboratory reports are sufficient for this course.


  • Assessment Method #2: Measurements & Construction (Required) of both DC and AC Simple Series/Parallel and Series Circuits Respectively

On an individual basis, the student will construct a three resistor DC circuit with a single source and measure a voltage and current and compute power. Later, the student will construct a two element RC circuit and demonstrate voltage measurement with an oscilloscope and current measurement with a multimeter.


Comments & Suggestions:

  • The same person should teach EET 101 and EET 109.

  • The instructor should blend calculator use and electronic simulation evaluations of circuits into laboratory reports.

  • The instructor should feel free to change the order in which material is covered. However, the instructor should make every effort to cover all the material.

  • The instructor should begin every two period laboratory class with a lecture that lasts at least 15 minutes. Most experiments can be completed in one period or less, especially if the laboratory class begins with a short lecture describing the procedures and purpose of the lab.

  • As noted earlier, most instructors will find it necessary to develop some handouts. They may also find it necessary to develop laboratory experiments, including laboratory exercise sheets of descriptions. The course coordinator would appreciate receiving copies of all course materials that are used so that they can be integrated into the course as appropriate and distributed to all campuses.


Course Coordinator: Richard Snyder, Instructor in Engineering/Altoona College

rjs17@psu.edu

EGT 101 – ENGINEERING GRAPHICS TECHNOLOGY

Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2003)

Catalog Description:

EGT 101:Engineering Graphics Technology

(1credit) Technical skills and drafting room practices; fundamentals of theoretical graphics; orthographic projection including sectional and auxiliary views; dimensioning.

Course prerequisites: EGT 102, ET 2 and or both concurrently

Goals of the Course:

EGT 101 To give students experience in the technical skills associated with manual drafting room practices through completion of assigned homework problems and quizzes.

Relationship to MET Program Outcomes:

EGT 101 contributes to the following MET program outcomes:

  • Outcome #4 Students should demonstrate proficiencies in computer applications.

  • Outcome #5 Students should be able to produce 2D drawings and 3D parametric solid models as a part of the applied engineering design process.

Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:

Outcome #4:

  • Students will successfully complete a set of Working Drawings for a Design Project using CAD computer Software.

Outcome #5:

  • Students will successfully complete assigned problems and quizzes covering 2D: Multi-view Projection, Dimensioning, Sectional Views, Auxiliary Views, Axonometric (Isometric) Projection, Oblique Projection, and 2D Design and Working Drawings.

Suggested Texts:

The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:

  • Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill, Dygdon. Engineering Graphics, 7th Edition., Prentice Hall, 2000.

  • Bethune, J. Engineering Graphics with AutoCAD 2002, Upper Saddle River, NJ; Prentice-Hall, 2002.

  • Earle, Engineering Design Graphics: AutoCAD 2000. 10 th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 2001.

  • Bilen, S. Introduction to Engineering Design, Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill, 2001.

Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:

  • Introductory understanding of Geometry and General Mathematics

Course Topics:

Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.

Note - One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.

  • Sketching and Shape Description (4 hours)

  • Multi-view Projection (4 hours)

  • Dimensioning (4 hours)

  • Instrumental Drawing (1 hour)

  • Lettering (1 hour)

  • Geometric Construction (1 hour)

  • Sectional Views (2 hours)

  • Auxiliary Views (2 hours)

  • Axonometric (Isometric) Projection (2 hours)

  • Oblique Projection (2 hours)

  • Geometric Tolerancing (1 hour)

  • Threads and Fasteners (1 hour)

  • Design and Working Drawings (5 hours)




Computer Use:

EGT 101 is taught in a classroom setting with each student working at his/her own computer. Students complete various homework assignments by sketching, using manual drafting instruments and drawing in a CAD software package.

Laboratory Exercises:




Required Equipment:

[If this is a laboratory course, list here the minimum equipment necessary to conduct laboratory exercises for the course. If this is not a laboratory course, delete this section.]

The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:

  • Computer station with CAD software for each student.

  • Printer/plotter, one per class.

  • Approximately 20”X26” drawing board for each student.

  • Drafting machine or T-square to suit drawing board dimensions for each student.

  • 30X60X90 degree triangle provided by student.

  • 45-degree equal lateral triangle provided by student.

  • drafting tape provided by student.

  • 12” engineers scale provided by student.

  • 12” architects scale provided by student.

  • 12” ruler with millimeter graduation provided by student.

  • protractor provided by student.

  • eraser - pencil lead provided by student.

  • mechanical lead holder and 4H, 2H, HB equivalent pencils provided by student.

  • Dividers provided by student.

  • Compass provided by student.




Course Grading:

Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.

Library Usage:

none

Course Assessment

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Collect and grade assigned homework problems related to course outcomes.

  • Collect and grade in class quizzes related to course outcomes.




Course Coordinator:

Eric Granlund, Instructor in Engineering, Altoona College, erg100@psu.edu


EGT 102 – ENGINEERING GRAPHICS TECHNOLOGY

Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2004)

Catalog Description:

EGT102: Engineering Graphics Technology

(1 credit). A first course presenting an intensive study utilizing a computer assisted drafting and design system to obtain graphic solutions.

Course prerequisites: EGT 101, ET 2 and or both concurrently

Goals of the Course:

EGT 102 EGT 102 is taught in a computer laboratory setting with each student working at his/her own computer. Students complete computer-aided-drafting homework assignments by drawing in a CAD software package. Related timed quizzes that are given during class also involve drawing in the CAD software package.

Relationship to MET Program Outcomes:

EGT 102 contributes to the following MET program outcomes:

  • Outcome #4 Students should demonstrate proficiencies in computer applications.

  • Outcome #5 Students should be able to produce 2D drawings and 3D parametric solid models as a part of the applied engineering design process.

Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:

Outcomes #4 & #5:

  • Students will successfully complete all assignments and quizzes using CAD computer Software. Possible topics include Multi-view Projection, Dimensioning, Sectional Views, Auxiliary Views, Axonometric (Isometric) Projection, and Design and Working Drawings.

Suggested Texts:

The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:

  • Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill, Dygdon, Engineering Graphics, Prentice Hall

  • Bethune, Engineering Graphics with AutoCAD, Prentice-Hall

  • Earle, Engineering Design Graphics: AutoCAD, Prentice-Hall

  • Bilen, Introduction to Engineering Design, McGraw-Hill

Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:

  • Introductory understanding of Geometry and General Mathematics

Course Topics:

Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.

Note - One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.

  • Computers & Computer Usage, CAD Software, File Manipulation (1 hour)

  • Basic Drawing; Use of Angel Course Management System (2 hours)

  • Basic Editing Commands (3 hours)

  • Text Options; Display Options; Drawing Tools (2 hours)

  • Other Drawing Entities (1 hour)

  • Layers, Linetypes, Template Creation, Settings (2 hours)

  • Dimensioning; Tolerances (2 hours)

  • Obtaining Information about Drawings (1 hour)

  • Advanced Editing Techniques (2 hours)

  • Hatching and Sectional Views; Construction Lines and Rays (2 hours)

  • Blocks (2 hours)

  • Electronic Symbols and Circuits ( 2 hours)

  • Borders and Attribute Automation ( 2 hours)

  • Isometric Drawing ( 2 hours)

  • Threads ( 2 hours)

  • Auxiliary Views ( 2 hours)




Computer Use:

EGT 102 is taught in a computer laboratory setting with each student working at his/her own computer. Students complete computer-aided-drafting homework assignments and in class quizzes by drawing in a CAD software package.

Laboratory Exercises:




Required Equipment:

The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:

  • Computer station and with CAD software for each student.

  • Printer/Plotter, one per class.




Course Grading:

Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.

Library Usage:

none

Course Assessment

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Collect and grade assigned homework problems related to course outcomes.

  • Collect and grade in class quizzes related to course outcomes.




Course Coordinator:

Irene Ferrara, Instructor in Engineering, Altoona College, ixf107@psu.edu



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