Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1




НазваниеAppendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1
страница12/25
Дата11.09.2012
Размер1.01 Mb.
ТипДокументы
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   25


IET 215 Production Design Course Outline

Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2004)

Catalog Description:

IET 215: Production Design

(2 credits) Production design with respect to current and advanced manufacturing technologies such as: conventional manufacturing, joining and assembly, CNC, CAM, and automation.

Course prerequisites: IET101, Concurrent: IET216

Goals of the Course:

Production Design

The study of the capability of manufacturing processes for the purpose of part creation and/or part feature creation, manufacturing systems, production planning, and production routing as they relate to production design including both current and advanced technologies such as: conventional manufacturing processes, CNC/CAM/CIM, and automation/robotics.


  • To introduce the student to the capabilities of current and advanced manufacturing processes so that the student can successfully incorporate those capabilities in the applied design of parts and/or assemblies.

  • To introduce the student to current and advanced computer applications with regard to manufacturing processes.

Relationship to MET Program Outcomes:

IET 215 contributes to the following MET program outcomes:

  • Students shall be able to solve technical problems through experimentation and analysis

  • Students shall possess an ability to communicate effectively

Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:

Students shall be able to solve technical problems through

experimentation and analysis:

  • Students will successfully solve production design problems that are typical of current and advanced technologies.

  • Students will successfully describe and recommend proper production tools and equipment for part creation and/or part feature creation.

  • Students will successfully develop and create route sheets that list and describe the manufacturing operations that are needed to produce a part and/or assembly.

Students shall possess an ability to communicate effectively.:

  • Students will prepare oral presentation(s), written report(s) and/or graphical solution(s) with regard to production design and the study of advanced manufacturing technologies.

Suggested Texts:

The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:

  • Manufacturing Materials and Processes, latest ed

Kosher, DeGarmo and Black

Wiley

  • Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing, Materials, Processes and Systems, latest ed

Groover

Prentice Hall

Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:

  • Mechanical and physical properties of engineering materials and a rudimentary understanding of manufacturing processes.

Course Topics:

Topics include both core topics (required) and additional relevant topics (based on regional industry needs and campus resources). Topics designated with an “*” are core topics.

  • * Chip-Type Machining Operations

  • * Fundamentals of Metal Forming

  • * Foundry

  • * Joining and Assembly

  • Bulk Deformation Processes in Metal Working.

  • Powder Metallurgy

  • CNC/CAM/CIM

  • Automation/Robotics

  • PLC’s

  • Rapid Prototyping

  • Electronics Assembly and Packaging

  • Microfabrication Technologies

  • Group Technology and Flexible Manufacturing Systems

  • Production Lines

  • Manufacturing Engineering

  • Production Planning and Control

  • Tooling and Tool Holders

  • Jig and Fixture Design

        • Nontraditional machining and thermal cutting processes

Computer Use:

Use of computer application program(s) such as: word processing, presentation software, spreadsheet software, CNC and/or CAM.

Course Grading:

Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.

Course Assessment

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Local developed assignments, quizzes, and/or exams.

  • Performance appraisal: oral presentation(s), written report(s), and/or graphical solution(s).

Course Coordinator:

Fred Nitterright, Lecturer in Engineering, Penn State Erie – The Behrend College, fxn101@psu.edu


IET 216 Production Design Laboratory

Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2004)

Catalog Description:

IET 216: Production Design Laboratory

(2 credits) Laboratory methods in production design with respect to current and advanced manufacturing technologies such as: conventional manufacturing, joining and assembly, CNC, CAM, and automation.

Course prerequisites: IET101, Concurrent: IET215

Goal of the Course:

Production Design Laboratory

The applied study of manufacturing processes for the purpose of part creation and/or part feature creation, manufacturing systems, production planning, and production routing as they relate to production design including both current and advanced technologies such as: conventional manufacturing processes, CNC/CAM/CIM, and automation/robotics.


  • In a laboratory setting; introduce the student to the capabilities of current and advanced manufacturing processes so that the student can successfully incorporate those capabilities in the applied design of parts and/or assemblies.

  • In a laboratory setting; introduce the student to current and advanced computer applications with regard to manufacturing processes.

Relationship to MET Program Outcomes:

IET 216 contributes to the following MET program outcomes:

  • Students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in applied design, manufacturing processes and mechanics. This course concentrates on the applied design and manufacturing processes aspect of this MET program outcome.

  • Students shall be able to solve technical problems through experimentation and analysis.

  • Students should demonstrate proficiencies in computer applications.




Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:

Students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in applied design, manufacturing processes and mechanics. This course concentrates on the applied design and manufacturing processes aspect of this MET program outcome.

  • Students will successfully set-up and operate industrial equipment and/or tooling with respect to current and advanced manufacturing processes, so that the student will understand how the capabilities of manufacturing processes impact the applied design of a part and/or part feature such as: lathes, milling machines, drill presses, foundry equipment, welding machines, sheet metal forming equipment, EDM’s, automation/robotics, and CNC machine tools.

  • Students will successfully develop and create route sheets that list the manufacturing operations that are needed to produce a part and/or assembly.

Students shall be able to solve technical problems through experimentation and analysis.

  • Students will successfully solve empirical problems associated with current and advanced manufacturing processes such as: speed and feed calculations, material removal rates, solidification shrinkage and/or developed length calculations.


Students shall be able to demonstrate proficiencies in computer applications

  • Students will successfully use computer applications that control the movements of machine tools, robots, and other mechanical systems such as: CNC programs, CAM software, and/or PLC’s.

  • Students will use word processing and/or spreadsheet software to complete problems associated with this course.

Suggested Texts:

The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:

  • Manufacturing Materials and Processes, latest ed

Kosher, DeGarmo and Black

Wiley

  • Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing, Materials, Processes and Systems, latest ed

Groover

Prentice Hall

Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:

  • Mechanical and physical properties of engineering materials from IET 101

Course Topics:

Topics include both core topics (required) and additional relevant topics (based on regional industry needs and campus resources). Topics designated with an “*” are core topics.

  • * Chip-Type Machining Operations

  • * Fundamentals of Metal Forming

  • * Foundry

  • * Joining and Assembly

  • Bulk Deformation Processes in Metal Working.

  • Powder Metallurgy

  • CNC/CAM/CIM

  • Automation/Robotics

  • PLC’s

  • Rapid Prototyping

  • Electronics Assembly and Packaging

  • Microfabrication Technologies

  • Group Technology and Flexible Manufacturing Systems

  • Production Lines

  • Manufacturing Engineering

  • Production Planning and Control

  • Tooling and Tool Holders

  • Jig and Fixture Design

  • Nontraditional machining and thermal cutting processes

Suggested Computer Use:

  • CNC programming

  • CAM Software

  • PLC programming

  • Word Processing

  • Spreadsheets

Laboratory Exercises:

Laboratory exercises include both core topics (required) and additional relevant topics (based on regional industry needs and campus resources). Laboratory exercises designated with an “*” are core topics.

  • * Set-up and operate Chip-Type Machining equipment

  • * Set-up and operate Metal Forming equipment

  • * Set-up and operate Foundry equipment

  • * Set-up and operate Joining and Assembly equipment

  • Set-up and operate Bulk Deformation Processes in Metal Working equipment

  • Set-up and operate Powder Metallurgy equipment

  • Set-up and operate CNC controlled machine tools

  • Set-up and operate Automation/Robotics

  • Set-up and operate PLC’s

Suggested Equipment:

  • Conventional machine tools such as: lathes, milling machines, drills, and grinders.

  • CNC controlled machine tools

  • Foundry equipment

  • Welding and Brazing equipment

  • Sheet metal forming equipment

  • Robots

  • Automation examples

  • PLC’s

  • Nontraditional machining and thermal cutting processes

Course Grading:

Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.

Course Assessment

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Written and/or oral reports

  • Project parts and/or assemblies

Course Coordinator:

Fred Nitterright, Lecturer in Engineering, Penn State Erie – The Behrend College, fxn101@psu.edu
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   25

Похожие:

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix b – hibernacula: forest habitat analysis 98 appendix c – literature cited 101

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconDraft appendix a appendix a documents to for accreditation

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix 4 university of pretoria format of curriculum vitae

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconA comprehensive Emergency Management Program Part II appendix E

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix a1

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix L

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix 1 – References

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconSupplementary Appendix

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix User Bibliography

Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1 iconAppendix User Bibliography

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница