Appendix 8: Curricula Vitae for Part-Time Faculty Appendix 1




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EET 221 - Linear Electronics Laboratory
Standard Course Outline (Updated Fall 2004)



Catalog Data:

221: Linear Electronics Laboratory
(1 credit). Laboratory study of diodes, BJT and JFET transistors, power supplies, small and large signal amplifiers, voltage regulators. Prerequisite EET205 and concurrent: EET216.

Goals of the Course:

Linear Electronics Laboratory is a required course for sophomore students in the Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) associate degree program. The purpose of the course is to teach students how to build circuits based primarily on diodes, BJTS and FETs and how to use digital multimeters, signal generators, frequency meters and oscilloscopes to test these circuits. In addition, students must learn to write well-organized reports using a word processor. Lastly, they must learn to apply PSPICE for Windows (or similar programs) to evaluate the potential performance of these circuits with the aid of a computer.

Relationship of EET Program Outcomes:

EET 221 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:

  • Students should be able to conduct experiments and then analyze and interpret results. (Outcome 2)

  • Students should be able to communicate effectively orally, visually and in writing. (Outcome 5)

  • Students should be able to apply creativity through the use of project-based work to the design of circuits, systems or processes. (Outcome 10)

Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the program are:

Outcome 2:

  • Students will demonstrate that theoretical device operation can be achieved in properly constructed circuits.

  • Students will be able to construct breadboard or prototype circuits.

  • Students will be able to use standard electronic test equipment such as oscilloscopes, function generators, digital multimeters, power supplies, and frequency counters.

  • Students will be able to analyze a circuit and compare theoretical performance to actual performance.

Outcome 5:

  • Students will be able to present an organized written engineering analysis on electronic testing of a circuit.

Outcome 10:


  • Using both device theoretical performance knowledge and analytical skills, students will be able to design formal test procedures that exercise and test circuit performance capabilities to demonstrate relationship to required performance.

Suggested Texts:

The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:

  • Berlin, Experiments in Electronic Devices, Prentice-Hall.

  • Goody, PSPICE for Windows, A Circuit Simulation Primer, Prentice-Hall.

  • (Reference) Boylstad & Nashelsky, Linear Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory

The instructor may need to supplement any of the above with notes and handouts.

Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering the course:

  • Basic arithmetic, algebra and trigonometry skills.

  • An understanding of the concepts and theories of linear amplifiers

  • The capability of using standard electronic laboratory testing equipment.

Computer Use:

Students are expected to use PSPICE for Windows (or equivalent software) to analyze electronic circuits tested in the lab, especially when calculating and presenting frequency response of amplifiers, and to use word processing software to write all reports.

Laboratory Exercises:

Suggested lab exercises listed below are from the Berlin book. Exercise numbers are indicated. (This listing is provided as only a guide to lab exercises that might be covered in this course. All may be supplemented by locally developed exercises.)

  1. Introduction to lab and review of lab policies

  2. Diode rectifier circuit & capacitor input rectifier (2 & 3)

  3. Limiter & clampers (4 & 5)

  4. Zener diode & zener regulators (7)

  5. Transistor biasing & common-emitter amplifiers (13)

  6. Common-collector & common-base amplifiers (14 & 16)

  7. Class B amplifiers (18)

  8. JFET self-biasing (21)

  9. MOSFET w/ PSPICE (22 modified)

  10. Common-source amplifier (22)

  11. Common-drain amplifier (23)

  12. Amplifier low frequency response (24)

  13. IC voltage regulator (40)

  14. Silicon controlled rectifiers (25)

  15. Final project presentations

Required Equipment:

The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:

  • DMM

  • Dual-trace oscilloscope

  • Signal generator

  • Frequency counter

  • Dual-output, variable DC power supply

  • Breadboard and miscellaneous components

  • Windows-based PC

The following equipment is also useful:

  • Digital scope

  • Data acquisition system

Course Grading:

Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor. However, a mix of informal and formal lab reports is recommended. It is also useful to consider requiring students to complete a significant final lab project. Lab reports should be required one week following completion of a lab, and informal and formal reports should be about equally balanced. Oral presentations should be required as part of some reports. A suggested grading strategy is:

  • Formal reports - 30%

  • Informal reports - 20%

  • Lab work and participation - 10%

  • Lab project – 40%

Comments & Suggestions:

  • The same person should teach EET 221 and EET 216.

  • The instructor should blend calculator use and electronic simulation evaluations of circuits into laboratory reports.

  • Students should work in teams, preferably two to a team.

  • If used, lab projects can be assigned by the instructor, or students may select them from technical magazines. In either case, projects should begin early in the semester. Preliminary presentations of project plans should occur no later than the 6th week of classes, and all projects should conclude with a formal report and presentation.

Course Assessment:

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Student completion and instructor grading of experiments from laboratory manuals.

  • Student design and preparation of a laboratory testing procedure.

Course Coordinator:

Gerry Cano, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer, New Kensington Campus (gxc15@psu.edu)



Appendix 5: 2MET Course Outlines


This Appendix contains the following Course Outlines for:


Course Course

Number Title Page No. 4

EG T 114 Spatial Analysis and CAD 301

EG T 201 Advanced CAD 303

IE T 101 Manufacturing Materials and Processes with Lab 306

IE T 215 Production Design 309

IE T 216 Production Design Laboratory 311

MCH T 111 Mechanics for Technology:Statics 314

MCH T 213 Strength and Properties of Materials 316

MCH T 214 Strength and Properties of Materials Laboratory MISSING 318

MET 206 Dynamics 319

MET 210W Product Design 322

EGT114 – Spatial Analysis and CAD

Standard Course Outline (Updated: Spring Fall 2004)

Catalog Description:

EGT114: Spatial Analysis and CAD

( 2 credits ) Spatial relations of applications in engineering technology, with more advanced functionality of computer-aided drafting and design systems. Prerequisites: EGT101, EGT 102

Goals of the Course:

  1. To teach students to obtain information from technical drawings: true length of lines, true area of plane surfaces, intersection of a line and a plane, intersection of two planes, true angle between two planar surfacesuse Pro/ENGINEER Wildfire software for effective, efficient, and accurate mechanical design solutions.

  2. To continues development of skills of technical drawings: assemblies, assembly sections, Bill of Materials, more complex geometries such as rounds, fillets, runouts, representation of a helixprovide as in threads realistic examples of mechanical design, including component and assembly design

  3. Introduce geometric dimensioning and tolerancingTo teach students to use the analysis tool to extract information from the part model

Relationship to 2MET Program Outcomes:

EGT114 contributes to the following 2MET program outcomes:

  • Students should be able to produce 2D drawings and 3D parametric solid models as a part of the applied engineering design process. (Program outcome 5)

  • Students should demonstrate proficiencies in computer applications. (Program outcome 4)

Course Outcomes:

The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are (this is dependent upon what software is being used):

3D2D or 3D Parametric Solid Model Outcome

  • Students will be able to obtain true shape – true size, distance, area, and angle data using methods of conventional descriptive geometry or the analyizeanalysis ze tools of athe parametric solid modeler adhering to ANSI Y14 standards: ProEngineer Wildfire



Demonstrate proficiencies in computer applications Outcome

  • Students will be able to successfully create helical and variable sweeps and modify complex geometry using 2D software or 3D the computer application software ProEngineerparametric solid modeling software adhering to ANSI Y14 standards

  • Students will be able to successfully create advanced rounds using the computer application software ProEngineer

  • Students will be able to successfully create patterns and family tables using the computer application software ProEngineer

  • Students will be able to successfully create and modify assemblies of three or more unique parts using the computer application software ProEngineer2D software or 3D parametric solid modeling software adhering to ANSI Y14 standards




Suggested Texts:

The following are suitable Ttexts and/or references for this course depending upon what software is being used:

  • Since the software used at each campus location where this course is taught varies, the instructor shall use the text for that software which is appropriate to the coverage of the course material stated above.ProENGINEEER Wildfire Advanced Tutorial, Toogood

  • Schroff Development Corporation

  • Digital Product Definition Data Practices, ASME Y14-41-2003, The American Society of Mechanical Engineers, New York, 2003. ISBN 0-7918-2810-7.




Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course depending upon what software is being used:

  • Create orthographic and pictorial sketches using ProENGINEER Wildfire

  • Apply dimensional and Geometric constraints using ProENGINEER Wildfire annotations to drawings or models

  • Create and modify orthographic multiview drawings, auxiliary drawings, and sectional drawingsExtrude sketches using ProENGINEER Wildfire

Apply placed features (rounds, holes, etc. using ProENGINEER Wildfire

Course Topics:

Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.

Note - One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.

[Insert a list of required course topics and a suggested lecture time to be devoted to each.]

  • PRO/E Customization Tools and Project Introduction: Configuration settings; customizing the screen toolbars and menus; mapkeys; part templates; introduction to the project (3 hours)

  • Helical Sweeps and variable section sweeps: Helical sweeps; pitch graphs; variable section sweeps; picking multiple trajectories; sweep parameter trajpar; using a Datum Graph to control a swept sectionc (3 hours)

  • Advanced Rounds and Tweeks: Simple and advanced rounds (variable radius, thru curve, full round, round sets, round transitions); the Round Tutor; (drafts, ribs, lips, and ears) (4 hours)

  • Patterns and Family Tables: Patterns of features using relations, and tables; Ref Patterns; Creating and using family tables for series of related parts (4 hours)

  • User Designed Features (UDF’s): Creating and using User Defined Features; Standalone and Subordinate modes; Independent and UDF Driven; using family tales; dimension display modes; patterns of UDF’s (4 hours)

  • Pro/PROGRAM and Layers: Using Pro/PROGRAM to create and run a part design file; input variables and conditionals; creating a family table using Instantiate; setting up and using Layers; default layers; adding items; controlling the layer display; layer settings in config.pro (4 hours)

  • Advanced Drawing Functions: The drawing setup file; dimension symbols; draft dimensions; tools for creating draft entities; drawing formats and parameters; tables and repeat regions; multi-model drawings; multi-sheet drawings; drawing templates (4 hours)




  • Multiview, auxiliary view and sectional view projections (10 hours)

  • Dimensioning, tolerancing and annotating (10 hours)

  • Working drawings and document control (10 hours)

  • Creating and modifying 3D models (20 hours)

  • Examinations and projects (10 hours)




Computer Use:

Students are to use ta he software computer running ProENGINEER Wildfire for all coursework (this is software dependent)available a that campus location

Required Equipment:

The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:

  • Personal computer 1.8gig, 256K mem, HD, FD, CDRW

  • 3 button mouse

  • 20 inch screen

  • Color plotter

  • Projection system

Course Grading:

Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.

Course Assessment

The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:

  • Performance appraisal: drawing projects completed

  • Local developed exams




Course Coordinator:

Dan Styduhar, Senior Instructor, Shenango Campus, unv@psu.edu


EG T 201 – Advanced C.A.D.

Standard Course Outline (Updated: Spring 2005)

Catalog Description:

EG T 201: Advanced C.A.D. (2 credits).

Application of the principles of engineering graphics; preparation of working drawings; details, examples, and bill of material using CAD.

Course prerequisites: EG T 101, 102, & 114

Preface:

With respect to the four course Engineering Graphics sequence there is a broad diversity in needs and thinking from Campus to Campus. This Course Outline presumes one particular thought process and sequence but many others are perfectly acceptable:

EG T 101: Sketching and Graphical Theory, i.e., Geometric Constructions, Orthographic Projection, and Dimensioning, which are required to create Working Drawings with 2D C.A.D.

EG T 102: 2D Computer-Aided Drafting

EG T 114: 3D Parametric Solid Modeling of Part Mode files with an emphasis at the end of the course on features which are skewed in space ( or otherwise geometrically complex ) and/or cannot be created without the use of construction points, lines and planes

Goals of the Course:

Professional parametric solid modeling software will be applied to produce complete, industry-typical and -standard working drawings, including part detail drawings and various types of assembly drawings; to implement the appropriately toleranced design of interfacing components; and to explore advanced productivity-enhancing add-in modules. Additionally, students will be introduced to the variety and relative precedence of specifications for feature tolerances and to the basic differences between form and size tolerancing.

Relationship to 2MET Program Outcomes:

Pursuant to the corresponding 2MET program outcomes, satisfactory completion of the EG T 201 course requires that students should be able to:

  • Apply concepts of applied mathematics and science in solving technical problems (Outcome W).

  • Demonstrate proficiencies in computer applications (Outcome X).

  • Produce two-dimensional (2.D.) drawings and three-dimensional (3.D.) parametric solid models as a part of the applied engineering design process (Outcome Y).

  • To matriculate and successfully complete a baccalaureate Mechanical Engineering Technology (4M.E.T.) degree program (Outcome Z).

Course Outcomes:

Using the provided computer hardware, CAD software, lectures, software demonstrations, and reference materials the student will produce acceptable calculations and CAD drawings. For example, acceptable CAD drawings will contain seven (or fewer) incorrect dimensions, seven (or fewer) incorrect line weights, one (or fewer) incorrect or misplaced drawing views, seven (or fewer) incorrectly cross-hatched parts in an assembly drawing, three (or fewer) detail omissions for purchased standard parts in an assembly drawings, or specific combinations of these types of errors. For example, tolerance stackup and other calculations will be completed to within 70% correctness and accuracy.

As course outcomes students will be able to:

Outcome 3:

  • Produce drawings which include manufacturable feature tolerancing.

  • Perform Tolerance stack-up calculations.

  • Understand basic principles of Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (G.D. & T.)

Outcome 4:

  • Produce part, drawing, and assembly mode files using 3D parametric solid modeling software.

  • Demonstrate proficiency with the abstract concept and software functionality which is known as bi-directional associativity.

  • Employ advanced, accurate and careful file managment, as required by 3D parametric solid modeling software.

Outcome 5:

  • Produce part detail and assembly drawings using fully associative drawing and dimensioning, assembly functionality, or both, and dimensioning to national standard ANSI Y14.5.

  • Precisely tolerance individual part features which interact between parts and sub-assemblies.

Outcome 6:

  • .Master the complexities of 3D parametric solid modeling software.

Suggested Texts:

The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:

  • Graphics Concepts with SolidWorks, 2nd ed., Lueptow and Minbiole; Prentice Hall, 2004.

  • Technical Drawing, 12th ed., Giesecke et al; Prentice Hall, 2003.

  • Technical Graphics Communication, 3rd ed., Bertoline et al.; McGraw Hill, 2003.

  • SolidWorks User's Guide, version specific, SolidWorks Corporation.

  • Descriptive Geometry, 9th ed., Paré and Hill; Prentice Hall, 1997.

  • Machinery's Handbook, 26th ed., Oberg, Jones, Horton, Ryfell; Industrial Press, Inc., 2000.

  • Dimensioning and Tolerancing, standard number Y14.5M-1994, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1994.

Prerequisites by Topic:

Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:

  • A thorough understanding of the principles of orthographic projection

  • An understanding of auxiliary drawing views and why they are used

  • An understanding of sectional views and why they are used

  • An understanding of CAD application software to the extent that accurately-dimensioned 2D drawings can be constructed, saved, retrieved and printed or plotted.

  • 3D Parametric solid (part) modeling capabilities:

  • Revolved & Extruded Base, Boss and Cut

  • Basic Editing of Skeches and Feature Definition

  • Swept Base, Boss and Cut

  • Use of Patterns, Feature Mirroring and the Hole Wizard

  • Lofted Base, Boss and Cut

  • Use of Reference Geometry to solve Spatial Analysis problems

Since thorough part modeling skills are prerequisite the instructor may wish to provide sets of precreated part files to the students for the drawing and assembly assignments in EG T 201.

Course Topics:

Topics generally correspond directly to the list of laboratory exercises in the next section.

Introductory Software Demonstrations

Necessarily, introductory demonstrations for software functionality that is new to the student should be conducted in conjunction with each specific assignment. Generally, demonstrations should be projected onto a highly visible screen, timely and limited to one hour of demonstration time per 2-3 hours of open laboratory time.

Theoretical Lectures

A total of 3-4 lecture periods (at 50 minutes each) can be used to introduce the following topics (separate from the computer laboratory):

  • Unilateral, bilateral and symmetric size tolerances

  • Form control and tolerances

  • Calculations for critical fits

  • Specification precedence for tolerances, e.g., stock size vs. size directly specified in the drawing field vs. title block tolerances vs. drawing notes, etc.

Laboratory Exercises:

The following laboratory assignments would be appropriate for this course (these may overlap and alternative assignments, based upon the prefatory comments, may be substituted):

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