1. 1 The London 2012 Directorate supports the Mayor in delivering his responsibilities and priorities with respect to the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic




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Название1. 1 The London 2012 Directorate supports the Mayor in delivering his responsibilities and priorities with respect to the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic
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Equality Act 2010: Review of the GLA’s functions in relation to compliance with the new general duty to promote equality


London 2012 Legacy & Games Delivery team


1. Introduction


1.1 The London 2012 Directorate supports the Mayor in delivering his responsibilities and priorities with respect to the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Directorate is split into two distinct (albeit linked) teams: City Operations, which manages the City Operations programme, and Legacy & Games Delivery which co-ordinates a diverse range of work to capture the legacy and benefits of the Games for London and support the Mayor in his role in the wider governance and promotion of the overall Games programme.


1.2 This review seeks to document the main deliverables of the Legacy & Games Delivery team as they relate to the new general duty to promote equality under the Equality Act 2010 (“the Act”) (see Appendix 1). A summary of each activity is provided below along with an analysis of the implications relating to the duty, and existing or proposed actions to ensure that the GLA is statutorily compliant and that the Mayor’s or GLA’s reputation is not at risk. A separate similar review has been prepared relating to City Operations; this includes the Accessibility for Visitors workstream, which is very substantially supported by the Paralympics Adviser from the Legacy & Games Delivery team but which is not discussed again here.


2. Tickets for London schoolchildren


2.1 The Mayor and London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) have developed a scheme to provide free tickets to the Games to one in eight 10-18 year olds in education in London. The tickets will be distributed to all London schools, colleges and other educational establishments that joined the London 2012 official education programme, the Get Set Network, by 16 December 2011. Educational establishments will be responsible for the allocation of their tickets to students.


2.2 The public ballot process showed that demand for tickets to the Olympic and Paralympic Games is high, and that there is therefore a good chance that many young Londoners will not have the opportunity to attend the Games. While tickets have been priced with affordability very much in mind, large families may nevertheless have been disinclined to purchase tickets because of the high aggregate cost for a whole family to attend one or more events.


2.3 To join the Get Set Network educational establishments are required to hold an education registration number and demonstrate their commitment to the Olympic and Paralympic Games. This offers young people at any school, college or educational establishment equal access to the opportunity to receive free tickets including special schools, hospital schools and pupil referral units.


2.4 As a result of the programme one in eight young Londoners from all backgrounds and regardless of family circumstances will be able to attend the Games and participate in an activity where their participation may have otherwise been disproportionately low, thus advancing equality of opportunity for young people.


2.5 Schools will receive confirmation of the exact tickets they will receive in March. The GLA will work with LOCOG to produce guidance for teachers, suggest ways in which they might chose to allocate tickets to their students and provide details of travel information. There is an opportunity to include reminders to teachers about the importance of distributing tickets to a diverse group of young people. LOCOG will also work with schools to ensure that the access and support requirements for disabled children are fully met.


2.6 The tickets offered through the scheme will be split approximately equally between Olympic, Paralympic athletics and football events at Wembley. The inclusion of Paralympic events in the ticket scheme will make an important contribution to tackling prejudice and promoting understanding amongst young people of the sporting achievements and potential of disabled people. As part of this, Channel 4, the UK’s official Paralympic Broadcaster (http://paralympics.channel4.com), has produced a DVD about Paralympians and Paralympic sport as a result of the programme and sent to all schools in the Get Set network.


3. East London legacy


Olympic Park Legacy Company


3.1 The Olympic Park Legacy Company (OPLC) is jointly owned by the Mayor and Government, and was established in 2009 to manage the development and maintenance of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park after the Games. The work of OPLC is not directly delivered by the GLA, but as a joint owner of the Company the Mayor has a high degree of accountability for its work; this will be even more true when the work of OPLC transfers to the London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC) in April 2012 as LLDC will be a Functional Body of the GLA, accountable solely to the Mayor.


Inclusive Design Strategy and Standards

3.2 Building on the spirit of the Paralympic and Olympic Games, the Park will retain world class sporting venues which have been designed to cater for disability sport and spectators alike. The Park and the Athletes’ Village were designed to be exemplary in terms of inclusive design: a place where everyone feels welcome, comfortable and safe, and can get around easily.  OPLC has developed an Inclusive Design Strategy which aims to continue the exemplary approach to inclusive design taken by the Olympic Delivery Authority.  It will be published shortly. 


3.3 The ODA's award winning Inclusive Design Standards are currently being updated and reviewed by the OPLC to ensure that the high standards of accessibility and inclusion achieved in the Paralympic and Olympic venues and Park are achieved in all the legacy developments, including in all the new homes to be built in the park.  Once finalised and adopted by the OPLC they will be published.


3.4 The ODA's Built Environment Access Panel - a panel of disabled people and access experts including the GLA’s Paralympics Adviser - has transferred from the ODA to the Legacy Company and continues to provide advice on implementing high standards of accessibility and embedding inclusive design principles into the work of the OPLC and its development partners. Continuing these processes will help to ensure that the high standards achieved by the ODA in the park and venues and of achieving ‘the most accessible Games ever’ are continued into legacy.


Equality and Inclusion Policy

3.5 OPLC has also developed an Equality and Inclusion Policy which takes account of the needs of protected groups and which will be published by the Company shortly. The following examples illustrate recent measures to implement these policies:


  • OPLC and Greenwich Leisure Limited, the appointed operator of the Park’s Aquatics Centre and Multi-use Arena, have established the following targets:




  • 70% of workforce to be from the six east London Host Boroughs

  • 50% of workforce to be women

  • 55% of workforce to be BAME

  • 3% of workforce to be disabled, rising to 5% after a period still to be agreed

  • 35 apprentices each year, of which 70% will work for GLL on completion

  • 84 volunteering and work experience opportunities over the contract’s duration




  • OPLC and Balfour Beatty, the firm appointed to manage the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park and ArcelorMittal Orbit, have established the following targets:




  • 85% of workforce to be from the six east London Host Boroughs

  • 42% of workforce to be women

  • 35% of workforce to be BAME

  • 7% of workforce to be disabled

  • Over 1000 volunteering opportunities to be created.

  • 50 apprenticeship spaces to be created throughout the contract with 80% moving to long term employment.

  • 80% of available supply contracts to be taken by SMEs, with 25 man days training provided.

  • The formation of the Community Interest Company “Our Parklife”.

  • Every direct employee and all contractor employees to earn London Living Wage (LLW) as a minimum.




  • OPLC is using its influence with partners to promote equality and inclusion in a number of ways:




  • OPLC is a partner in the Women into Construction Project, initiated by the Olympic Delivery Authority and now led by Be On Site at Lend Lease

  • OPLC is working with bidders for Chobham Manor, the Park’s first residential development, to establish appropriate targets, including those for protected groups.

  • OPLC has impressed upon private sector partners the need to ensure London Living Wage, flexible working and eradication of occupational segregation in an effort to address gender pay issues.

  • OPLC has embedded the Lifetime Neighbourhood concept into its design standards and development processes. Creating inclusive neighbourhoods is a prerequisite to achieving sustainable communities; with the Park designed to promote opportunities for diverse groups of people to live, work and enjoy together.


Transition to London Legacy Development Corporation

3.6 In April 2012, the assets, programme and staff of OPLC will transfer in their entirety into the London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC), along with a small number of assets, programmes and staff from the London Thames Gateway Development Corporation (LTGDC). The creation of the LLDC, and the transfer of programmes from OPLC and LTGDC, was the subject of a public consultation by the Mayor carried out between February and April 2011. The consultation paper included an impact assessment of the Mayor’s proposals which concluded that, while the change in organisational arrangements would not in itself have a significant impact in the field of equality and inclusion (among others), these challenges could nevertheless be more effectively met by creating the Corporation in the way proposed. The consultation papers, and subsequent statements by the Mayor on his proposals to create the LLDC, are available on the GLA website at www.london.gov.uk. The LLDC, once established, will be subject to the obligations arising from the Act, including the General Duty


Convergence Action Plan 2011-15

3.7 In December 2011, the Mayor and six east London host boroughs adopted the Convergence Framework and Action Plan 2011-15 as an updated expression of the ambition and work programme to achieve convergence, that is the aim that, within 20 years, the communities that host the 2012 Games will have the same social and economic chances as their neighbours across London. The GLA is leading a project with partners in the Host Boroughs to review the Convergence Framework and Action Plan 2011-15, to ensure that activities, projects and programmes within the Action Plan are planned and delivered to meet the general equality duty, including by advancing equality of opportunity for groups that share protected characteristics in areas that they are disproportionately underrepresented such as employment. It is expected that the project will be completed by the end of April 2012 and a Statement of recommendations and actions will be published to demonstrate compliance with the Act.


4. Employment and skills legacy


4.1 In July 2011, the GLA inherited from the London Development Agency three projects aimed at maximising the chances of workless Londoners to take advantage of employment and training opportunities associated with the Games. These were the Host Borough Skills & Employment project, the Construction Employer Accord project and the 2012 Employment Legacy project. All three projects target those furthest from the labour market, principally people who have been 'economically inactive' (not in work or not claiming a benefit which requires them to look for work) for more than 12 months. This helps focus the work of the project toward minority groups, as evidence shows they are over-represented amongst the economically inactive.


4.2 Each of the project contracts, in line with the standard LDA Grant Agreement terms, requires the GLA’s delivery partners to comply with 'all applicable existing and future equal opportunities laws, regulations and guidance and LDA guidance in relation to race, nationality, ethnicity, disability, sex, sexual orientation, age, religion or belief', they will also ensure project activities eliminate all forms of discrimination in your employment practices. Finally, it also states the project promotes diversity, values of diversity of people within the London region, and demonstrates a commitment to equal opportunities in there employment practices, provision of goods, products and project activities. Also a requirement to complete the Diversity Works for London Gold Standard Tool kit. Additionally each project has specific stretching targets to encourage it work with people from minority or disadvantaged groups: BAME, disabled people and women. The programme has been very successful in working with BAME people in particular, with 79% of people supported this year coming from these groups.


4.3 By giving people additional support to enter and stay in the labour market the programme is working to remove the economic disadvantage associated with being out of work, and to improve the representation of these groups in employment, where participation is disproportionately low.


5. Inspire programme


5.1 The London 2012 Inspire Programme has supported the activities of over 350 Games-inspired projects and events in London by awarding them use of the London 2012 Inspire Mark logo. All of the projects and events joining the Inspire Programme have been asked to confirm that they are open, inclusive and accessible to as many people as possible.  The vast majority of projects and events are therefore either free to attend or charge only a nominal fee so that lower income groups are equally able to take part.  All of the venues will be open to people of any race, faith, sexuality or disability.


5.2 Partly as a consequence of the Paralympic Games being part of the London 2012 programme, many of the projects and events that form part of the Inspire Programme in London have the objective of furthering opportunities for disabled people, whether that be by offering disabled people the opportunity to take part in sport and physical activity, arts and creative workshops or education programmes aimed at helping participants into full-time employment.  Several projects within the Inspire Programme in London also have the explicit objective of strengthening community cohesion and breaking down barriers between people.  In a handful of cases these projects or events have also been awarded use of the term 'Olympic Truce' along with the Inspire Mark logo. Overall, this demonstrates compliance with the General Duty by tackling prejudice and promoting understanding


6. London 2012 Equality & Diversity Forum


6.1 Alongside the specific initiatives described below, the Legacy & Games Delivery team works closely with the GLA Diversity and Social Policy team as support the London 2012 Equality and Diversity Forum, which brings together the main London 2012 partners (including the Greater London Authority, the Olympic Delivery Authority, the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games, the Olympic Park Legacy Company and the Government Olympic Executive) to co-ordinate, assure and promote the performance of the overall London 2012 programme with respect to equality and diversity.


6.2 The Forum has been a major driver across the Games programme for work to advance equality of opportunity for communities underrepresented in certain areas, such as through the volunteering opportunities provided by the Games. Where there may be unintended incidences of unlawful discrimination such as access for people with mobility impairments getting to Games venues, the Forum has reviewed the work on the ‘last mile’ and the LOCOG’s spectator journey planner (http://www.london2012.com/visiting/getting-to-the-games/plan-your-travel/spectator-journey-planner.php).


6.3 The Legacy & Games Delivery Unit leads on the production of the Forum’s annual report, Working Towards an Inclusive Games, which demonstrates the continued commitment of the London 2012 partners to ensure that London delivers the most accessible Games to date, highlights the examples of good practise in increasing access and inclusion to a wide range of sporting, business, contract and volunteering opportunities and celebrates the success of the ODA in building fully accessible and inclusive venues. 


7. Access and Inclusion


7.1 Work is now underway to establish how the good practice achieved in delivering the Games can be continued in legacy. The GLA’s City Operations team has led on a number of accessibility initiatives to ensure that disabled visitors to London have an accessible and inclusive experience this summer. Work is now underway to ensure that these initiatives can where appropriate continue after the Games; for example the GLA is working with Direct Enquiries to continue the Inclusive London web site which provides detailed access information about hotels, restaurants, and other tourist attractions in London and with the hospitability sector to maintain Destination London, the free online course to assist staff in hospitality, retail and other and customer-facing organisations to gain a better understanding of what disabled visitors need and want from them.


7.2 Lessons learnt by improving access along the South Bank of the River Thames, such as the successful improvement to the historic environment at Clink Street, can be promoted and shared with the boroughs to ensure routes across London continue to be made more accessible. There is also an opportunity to promote the legacy benefits of the inclusive design processes developed by the ODA through its Inclusive Design Strategy and Standards to developers outside the Olympic Park and embed this best practice into planning and construction work across the rest of London. There are also opportunities to further develop some of the public transport initiatives such as the portable and permanent ramps in underground stations and the lessons learnt from developing the Games mobility service and whether other areas of London can be opened up to disabled people by extending mobility services.


APPENDIX 1 – EQUALITY ACT OBLIGATIONS


The Equality Act 2010 places a duty on public sector organisations to pay due regard, in the exercise of its functions, to the need to:


  1. Eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation and any other conduct which is unlawful under the Equality Act 2010




  1. Advance equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic, and those who don’t have that characteristic. This means in particular:




    1. Removing or minimising disadvantages suffered by people who share a protected characteristic that are connected to that characteristic

    2. Taking steps to meet the needs of people who share a protected characteristic that are different from the needs of people who don’t have that characteristic

    3. Encouraging people who share a protected characteristic to participate in public life or in any other activity in which their participation is disproportionately low




  1. Foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic, and those who don’t have that characteristic. This means, in particular:

    1. Tackling prejudice

    2. Promoting understanding.


The protected characteristics are

  • age

  • disability

  • gender reassignment

  • pregnancy and maternity

  • race

  • religion or belief

  • sex

  • sexual orientation

  • marriage and civil partnership

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