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George Mason UniversityGraduate Council Graduate Course Approval Form




All courses numbered 500 or above must be submitted to the Graduate Council for final approval after approval by the sponsoring College, School or Institute.


Graduate Council requires submission of this form for a new course or any change to existing courses. For a new course, please attach a copy of the syllabus and catalog description (with catalog credit format, e.g. 3:2:1). The designated representative of the College, School or Institute should forward the form along with the syllabus and catalog description, if required, as an email attachment (in one file) to the secretary of the Graduate Council. A printed copy of the form with signatures and the attachments should be brought to the Graduate Council meeting. Please complete the Graduate Course Coordinator Form if the proposed changes will affect other units.


Note: Colleges, Schools or Institutes are responsible for submitting new or modified catalog descriptions (35 words or less, using catalog format) to Creative Services by deadlines outlined in the yearly Catalog production calendar.


Please indicate: New__X____ Modify_______ Delete_______


Department/Unit:_Chemistry and Biochemistry____ Course Subject/Number:____CHEM 567_______________


Submitted by:___Timothy L. Born_____________ Ext:___3-4171_____ Email:___tborn@gmu.edu_________


Course Title:_Chemistry of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions_________________________


Effective Term (New/Modified Courses only): _Fall, 2008____ Final Term (deleted courses only):____________


Credit Hours: (Fixed) __3__ (Var.) ______ to ______ Grade Type (check one): __X__ Regular graduate (A, B, C, etc.)

_____ Satisfactory/No Credit only

_____ Special graduate (A, B, C, etc. + IP)


Repeat Status*(check one): _X_ ­­­ NR-Not repeatable ____ RD-Repeatable within degree ____ RT-Repeatable within term

*Note: Used only for special topics, independent study, or internships courses Total Number of Hours Allowed: _______

Schedule Type Code(s): 1.__LEC LEC=Lecture SEM=Seminar STU=Studio INT=Internship IND=Independent Study 2.____ LAB=Lab RCT=Recitation (second code used only for courses with Lab or Rct component)


Prereq _X_ Coreq ___ (Check one):_Chem 313 and 463 or permission of instructor___________________


__________________________________________________________________________________________

Note: Modified courses - review prereq or coreq for necessary changes; Deleted courses - review other courses to correct prereqs that list the deleted course.


Description of Modification (for modified courses):____________________________________________________________________


Special Instructions (major/college/class code restrictions, if needed):__________________________________________





Department/Unit Approval Signature:_________________________________________ Date: _____________


College/School Committee Approval Signature:__________________________________ Date:_____________




Graduate Council Approval Date:____________ Provost Office Signature:_________________________________


George Mason University Graduate Course Coordination Form


Approval from other units:


Please list those units outside of your own who may be affected by this new, modified, or deleted course. Each of these units must approve this change prior to its being submitted to the Graduate Council for approval.


Unit:

Bioinformatics and Computational Biology


Head of Unit’s Signature: CHEM 567

Date:

Unit:


Molecular and Microbiology


Head of Unit’s Signature: CHEM 567

Date:

Unit:



Head of Unit’s Signature:

Date:

Unit:



Head of Unit’s Signature:

Date:

Unit:



Head of Units Signature:

Date:



Graduate Council approval: ______________________________________________ Date: ____________


Graduate Council representative: __________________________________________ Date: ____________


Provost Office representative: ____________________________________________ Date: ____________


Course Proposal Submitted to the Graduate Council

by

The College of Science


1. COURSE NUMBER AND TITLE: CHEM 567: The Chemistry of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions


Course Prerequisites: CHEM 313 and 463 (or equivalent), or permission of the instructor


Catalog Description: (3:3:0) Examples of enzyme mechanisms demonstrate how chemical principles are employed by living organisms. Specific enzyme mechanisms are used to illustrate principles from organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry. Discusses techniques used to monitor enzyme reactions.


2. COURSE JUSTIFICATION:


Course Objectives:

Enzymes have the ability to stereospecifically catalyze reactions in water at neutral pH, 37˚C and 1 atm pressure that require extremes of temperature, pressure, and solvent when performed in the laboratory. How can they do this while obeying all the laws of chemistry and physics? In this class we will attempt to answer this question by looking at specific classes of enzymes and studying their catalytic strategies. We will also look at the larger biological context of each enzyme and discuss how it fits within the framework of a living organism.

The assigned text will be used as a source of background information for the study of enzymes and kinetics, but extensive use will be made of the biochemical literature and students will be expected to read the published research. The biochemical and clinical relevance of each enzyme studied will be highlighted when appropriate.

The goals of this course are:

  1. Introduce the student to the beauty and elegance of enzymes.

  2. Illustrate how the chemical principles learned in previous chemistry classes apply to biological situations.

  3. Bring each student to a general understanding of and appreciation for how enzymes work.

  4. Give each student a chance to work on their written and oral communication skills.


Course Necessity:

The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department is in the process of strengthening its current graduate program by introducing new courses in the area of biochemistry. This course is currently approved as an undergraduate course, CHEM 467, but the course content and style of teaching make it an appropriate course for starting graduate students. The majority of the semester is spent reading papers from the primary literature and discussing the results of these experiments. In this way, students begin to learn how to critically read the literature and design a coherent set of experiments. In previous years, the course has been offered as a graduate-level special topics course in conjunction with the undergraduate course and has been well-subscribed by graduate students (~10 in both years). The course will also complement other biochemistry-related graduate offerings within the department. Students taking this course at the graduate level will be required to write a paper and give an oral presentation on an enzyme of their choice.


Course Relationship to Existing Programs:

This course is primarily intended for beginning students in the MS program in Chemistry (particularly those in the biochemistry concentration) and in the PhD program in Physical Sciences, but students in the Biosciences, Bioinformatics, and similar graduate programs will also be welcome. The prerequisite of undergraduate organic chemistry and general biochemistry classes means that most students in these programs are adequately prepared.

Course Relationship to Existing Courses:

No similar courses are known to exist within in the University outside of the CHEM 467.


3. APPROVAL HISTORY: N/A


4. SCHEDULING AND PROPOSED INSTRUCTORS:

Semester of Initial Offering: Fall of 2008


Proposed Instructors: Dr. Timothy L. Born


5. TENTATIVE SYLLABUS: See attached.


Chemistry 567: The Chemistry of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions


Instructor: Timothy L. Born

Meeting times: Tuesday 7:20 – 10:00

Class room: Innovation Hall, room 338

Office Hours: MW 3:00 – 4:00, T 5:30 – 7:00, other times by appointment

Office location: S&T1, Room 360; Bull Run Hall, Room 327

Web page: http://mason.gmu.edu/~tborn


Required Text: Enzymes: A practical introduction to structure, mechanism, and data analysis, R.A. Copeland

Supplemental Text: Principles of Biochemistry, 4th Ed, by Nelson and Cox, or similar General Biochemistry Text


Course Description

Enzymes have the ability to stereospecifically catalyze reactions in water at neutral pH, 37˚C and 1 atm pressure that require extremes of temperature, pressure, and solvent when performed in the laboratory. How can they do this while obeying all the laws of chemistry and physics? In this class we will attempt to answer this question by looking at specific classes of enzymes and studying their catalytic strategies. We will also look at the larger biological context of each enzyme and discuss how it fits within the framework of a living organism.


The assigned text will be used as a source of background information for the study of enzymes and kinetics, but extensive use will be made of the biochemical literature and students will be expected to read the published research. The biochemical and clinical relevance of each enzyme studied will be highlighted when appropriate.


The first four weeks will consist primarily of lectures as we cover the required background material. In the next eight weeks, however, we will spend the first half of the class period discussing the assigned papers and I will lecture on the topic for next week’s assigned papers during the second half of the class period. Everyone will be required to participate in the class discussion and part of your grade will be determined by your participation (see below).


One of the most important skills of a scientist is communication, both written and verbal. To help establish communication skills, each student will be required to give a written and an oral presentation on an enzyme of their choice. More details will be handed out during the first few weeks of class, but you will be required to pick an enzyme, research its relevance and mechanism, write a short (10-15 pages) paper describing your enzyme, and finally give a 15-20 minute presentation on your enzyme.


Biochemistry is a large and complicated subject with a unique language that makes it even more difficult and it takes time and dedication to earn a good grade in this class. You should not expect to earn a “C” simply by showing up every day, and you should not expect to pass the class if you do not show up every day. It is important that each student commit to spending significant hours outside of lecture reviewing the material and reading the assigned readings. If you are unable to make this commitment you are unlikely to perform well in the class and may want to consider taking it at another time.


The goals of this course are:

  1. Introduce the student to the beauty and elegance of enzymes.

  2. Illustrate how the chemical principles learned in previous chemistry classes apply to biological situations.

  3. Bring each student to a general understanding of and appreciation for how enzymes work.

  4. Give each student a chance to work on their written and oral communication skills.


I will do my best to post lecture notes on my web page a day or two ahead of time. Feel free to download these files and take them to class with you as they may make it easier to follow the lecture.


Grading and Examination Policy

The grading for this course will be based upon one midterm exam, one final exam, class participation, and a written and oral presentation. Both of the exams will be take-home and will cover the material discussed in lecture as well as the assigned reading. I reserve the right to ask questions on material assigned in the reading but not covered in lecture.


Mid-term Exam 100 pts

Final Exam 100 pts

Class Participation 100 pts

Oral Presentation 100 pts

Written Presentation 100 pts


A grade of 0 (zero) will be assigned if an exam is missed. Points for both and the presentations will be combined and the percentage determined by dividing the number of points received by the total number of points available (500). No extra credit will be given apart from designated exam questions.


An absolute grading scale cannot be determined until all scores have been compiled and evaluated. As a general rule, however, the following scale will be closely followed:

90-100% A

80-89% B

70-79% C

60-69% D

<60% F

A plus (+) or minus (-) may be added to a grade at the instructor’s discretion.


If you are a student with a disability and you need academic accommodations, please see me and contact the Disability Resource Center (DRC) at 993-2474. All academic accommodations must be arranged through that office.


Honor Code

All students are expected to adhere to the University Honor Code: “Student members of the George Mason University community pledge not to cheat, plagiarize, steal, or lie in matters related to academic work.” If you are caught cheating on an exam you will have your exam taken away from you and will be asked to leave the room. If you are caught plagiarizing on your written presentation you will given a score of zero. All violations will be reported to the Honor Committee and you will be prosecuted to the fullest extent possible.


Note: Cell phones and beepers are not allowed in this class. If they go off, you go out the door.


The Chemistry of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions

CHEM 567

Text: Enzymes: A practical introduction to structure, mechanism, and data analysis, Copeland

Lehninger, Biochemistry, 4th Edition, or similar General Biochemistry Text

Selected Readings from the biochemical literature


Lecture

Date

topic

text assignment

1

1/23

Amino Acids, Protein structure, introduction to Enzymes

Lehninger, Ch. 3&4

Copeland, Ch. 1-3

2

1/30


Enzyme Kinetics and Assays

Lehninger Ch. 6

Copeland Ch. 4-7

3

2/6


Enzyme Inhibition

Lehninger Ch. 6

Copeland, Ch 8-10

3

2/13

Proteases

Handouts

4

2/20

Superfamilies and Enolase Family Enzymes

Handouts

5

2/27

Nudix Hydrolases

Handouts

6

3/6

Sir2 Histone deacetylases

Handouts

7

3/13

Spring Break




8

3/20

Cyclooxygenase

Handouts

9

3/28

Kinases & Phosphatases

Handouts

10

4/3

PLP-dependent Enzymes

Handouts

11

4/10

Cholesterol Enzymes

Handouts

12

4/17

Oxalate Metabolism

Handouts

13

4/24

Student Presentations




14

5/1

Student Presentations




15

5/8

Final Exam; 7:20 – 10:00





Topics for your oral and written presentations will be due on February 27th. First drafts of your written papers must be handed in by class on March 28th and the final papers by April 17th.


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