Student warning: This course syllabus is from a previous semester archive and serves only as a preparatory reference. Please use this syllabus as a reference




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НазваниеStudent warning: This course syllabus is from a previous semester archive and serves only as a preparatory reference. Please use this syllabus as a reference
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STUDENT WARNING: This course syllabus is from a previous semester archive and serves only as a preparatory reference. Please use this syllabus as a reference only until the professor opens the classroom and you have access to the updated course syllabus. Please do NOT purchase any books or start any work based on this syllabus; this syllabus may NOT be the one that your individual instructor uses for a course that has not yet started. If you need to verify course textbooks, please refer to the online course description through your student portal.

This syllabus is proprietary material of APUS.







Anthropology


ANTH 201


Introduction to Physical Anthropology

3 Credit Hours
8 Week Course
Prerequisite(s): None





Table of Contents




Instructor Information

Evaluation Procedures

Course Description

Grading Scale

Course Scope

Course Outline

Course Objectives

Policies

Course Delivery Method

Academic Services

Course Materials

Selected Bibliography




Course Description (Catalog)


This course is an introduction to the human species as revealed by living fossil primates, ancient forms of humanity, and the interaction of biological and cultural evolution. It will examine the origin and evolution of the human species, primates, modern human variation, prehistoric societies, and linguistic classification.


Table of Contents


Course Scope

This course is divided into 8 weeks and is organized to give students a broad context in which to study physical anthropology. In this course, students will read about human evolution and non-human primates as they are located throughout the world. Instruction is primarily textbook driven with accompanied online lectures and online classroom weekly discussion.

Because this is a survey course of a broad subject, it will out of necessity, cover each topic with a broad brush. However, the reference area and online conference room will allow a deeper look into any subject area that particularly attracts the student. The student will learn how to use the World Wide Web to research topics related to the material discussed and covered in the textbook.

Table of Contents

Course Objectives


Welcome to Introduction to Physical Anthropology! I look forward to sharing the world of physical anthropology with you. After you have completed this course, you should be able to:


  • Define anthropology and describe its four major subfields, highlighting the major areas of research within physical anthropology

  • Assess the importance of the biocultural approach in physical anthropology, and describe scientific approaches and critical analysis techniques

  • Describe the development of theories of biological evolution; restate the independent theories of several key theorists such as Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace, Jean Baptiste Lamarck and others

  • Recognize and describe a variety of key terms such as: fixity of species, stasis, fitness, natural selection, homologies, analogies, Laws of Segregation, Independent Assortment, etc.

  • Describe the basic principles of Mendelian inheritance, Mendelian characteristics in humans, the basic types of cells and their structures and functions

  • Restate the processes of cell division: mitosis and meiosis, the structure and function of DNA and RNA, and describe genes and chromosomes

  • Discuss which commonly known primates live in which geographical locations, and review primate social behaviors and how environment affects behavior

  • Discuss various dating techniques in detail

  • Describe the geologic time scale and offer a brief overview of vertebrate evolution

  • Explain the importance of taxonomic classifications in understanding evolutionary relationships

Table of Contents

Course Delivery Method

This elective course delivered via distance learning will enable students to complete academic work in a flexible manner, completely online. Course materials and access to an online learning management system will be made available to each student. Online assignments are due by the last day of each week and include Discussion Board questions (accomplished in groups through a threaded discussion board), examinations and quizzes (graded electronically), and individual assignments (submitted for review by the Faculty Member). Assigned faculty will support the students throughout this eight-week course.

Table of Contents

Course Materials

Jurmain, Robert, Lynn Kilgore, and Wenda Trevathan. 2009. Essentials of Physical Anthropology, Seventh Edition. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth, Inc. ISBN: 13-978-0-495-50939-4.

Table of Contents

Evaluation Procedures


The nature of an on-line course dictates a significant degree of independent work. I will provide you with the resources, experience, and guidance; you assume the responsibility for managing your time, learning the material, and completing assignments on time.


It is imperative that you read your email every time you log onto the Internet and the classroom. Important updates to your assignments, due dates, etc. will be sent to you via email.


For the purposes of this course, a “week” is defined as the time period between Monday–Sunday. The first week begins on the first day of the semester and ends on midnight the following Sunday.


I have designed this course so that weekly readings include:

  • Several chapters of a text book

  • My weekly “lecture notes” which are located in “course announcements.”



Grades in this course are based on the following:


  1. Class Participation/Discussion: Participation will be evaluated based on the degree of interaction you have with me and with your fellow students. This component is worth 20% of your final grade.


You are required to participate in classroom discussions. Respecting your busy schedules, discussion work is asynchronous, meaning you are not required to be on-line at a specific time or place with the professor and other members of your course. Instead, you post your comments on the discussion board. (You certainly may choose to interact synchronously with your classmates or me, via a chat room, however).


Classroom discussion work must, however, be posted in the classroom on the week assigned. Classroom discussions will not be accepted via email, snail mail, or phone calls. All posted discussions must be relevant to the week’s reading. That is: week 4 requires a discussion on the readings and assignments for week 4. Postings unrelated to the week’s discussion will not be counted as participation.


Full participation is: signing in weekly and contributing to the class discussion(s), each week, with meaningful and valid discussions.


The Discussion Board Procedures are:


1) Submit your initial posting in the Discussion Board, making sure that it is at least 200 words long.

2) Respond to at least one of your classmates. (There is no minimum word count here).

3) Then, copy and paste your initial post to a Word document.

4) Upload the Word document to the Assignments section on the proper week, and check “Submit for Grading” so the instructor can grade your response.


  1. Two short, thoughtful reaction papers: The week before your paper is due, you will be given a choice of topics in which you are to react/respond in a 3-5 page “quickie” paper. 3-5 full pages of text is roughly 750-1200 words. These short, thoughtful papers require no research and are merely a means for me to see that you are reading, understanding, assimilating and synthesizing the course readings. This component is worth 20% of your final grade.


The due dates for these “quickie” papers are listed in your course outline, below, and will be listed in the “assignment section,” in the classroom, as well.


  1. Open Book/Open Note, TIMED, Midterm Examination: Worth 20% of your final grade. The due date for this exam is listed in your course outline, below.




  1. Open Book/Open Note, TIMED, Final Examination: Worth 20% of your final grade. The due date for this exam is listed in your course outline, below.




  1. Four, Open Book/Open Note, Multiple Choice Quizzes: This component is worth 20% of your final grade. These multiple choice quizzes with cover the lecture notes and readings of the week in which your quiz is due. Each quiz will be 15 questions long. There is no time limit for completing your quizzes.


Quizzes are located in the “exams section” of the classroom.


Summary:


Graded Events Total POssible % of Final Points GRADE


Class Participation 12.5 each week (for 8 weeks) 20%

Two Short Papers 50 each 20%

Midterm Exam 100 20%

Final Exam 100 20%

Four Quizzes 25 each 20%

Table of Contents

Grading Scale




Please see the student handbook to reference the University’s grading scale.

Table of Contents

Course Online




Week



Topic(s)


Learning Objective(s)

Reading(s)


Assignment(s)


1

Introduction to Physical Anthropology/Evolutionary Theory/Biological Basis of Life

* Define anthropology and describe its four major subfields

* Discuss the major areas of research within physical anthropology

* Assess the importance of the biocultural approach in physical anthropology


Jurmain, Kilgore, and Trevathan (J, K, T) – Chapters 1-3; Lecture Notes (In Course Announcement)

* Become familiar with your on line classroom

* Participate in classroom discussion

* 1st Quiz Due


2

Heredity and Evolution/Macroevolution


* Discuss the basic principles of Mendelian inheritance

* Interpret Mendelian characteristics in humans

* Recognize and describe Laws of Segregation

Jurmain, Kilgore, and Trevathan (J, K, T) – Chapters 4-5; Lecture Notes (In Course Announcement)


* Participate in classroom discussion

* 1st Quickie Paper Assigned

* 2nd Quiz Due


3

Primates/Primate

Behavior and

Hominid Origins

Primates/Primate Behavior/Hominid Origins

* Associate how various environmental factors influence primate social behavior

* Describe various types of social interactions within primate groups such as: grooming, dominance, etc.

* Discuss the influence of natural selection on primate behavior


Jurmain, Kilgore, and Trevathan (J, K, T) – Chapters 6-8; Lecture Notes (In Course Announcement)

* Participate in classroom discussion

* Midterm Exam Given Out

* 1st Quickie Paper Due


4

Midterm week! Assimilate and Synthesize.

* Summarize the chronology of the East African, Central African, and South African hominid finds

* Discuss various dating techniques in detail

* Describe the geologic time scale and offer a brief overview of vertebrate evolution


Lecture Notes (In Course Announcement)

Midterm Exam Due

* Participate in classroom discussion


5

Homo Erectus, Contemporaries, and Neandertals/Other archaic Homo Sapiens/Homo Sapiens sapiens: US!

* Describe the general characteristics of Homo erectus and their geographical distribution

* Trace the discovery of Homo erectus fossil materials

* Describe the morphology and geographic distribution of archaic Homo sapiens including the Neandertals


Jurmain, Kilgore, and Trevathan (J, K, T) – Chapters 9-11; Lecture Notes (In Course Announcement)

* Participate in classroom discussion

* 2nd Quickie Paper Assigned

* 3rd Quiz Due


6

Human Variation and Adaptation; The Human Life Course

* Explain the reasons for the importance of genetic variations in human populations and describe how natural selection works with variation

* Describe the interactions between biology and culture in human evolution

* Discuss growth and development and the factors affecting stature attainment in human populations


Jurmain, Kilgore, and Trevathan (J, K, T) – Chapters 12-13; Lecture Notes (In Course Announcement)


* Participate in classroom discussion

* 2nd Quickie Paper Due


7

Lessons from the Past

* Discuss human nutritional needs, human brain growth, and changes in human diets over thousands of years

* Interpret the human life cycle in comparison with other primates, past and present


Jurmain, Kilgore, and Trevathan (J, K, T) – Chapter 14; Lecture Notes (In Course Announcement)


* Participate in classroom discussion

* Final Exam Given Out

* 4th Quiz Due


8

Conclusion to Physical Anthropology/Making Sense of it All

* Describe humans in the context of the biological continuum

* Describe the factors contributing to human population growth

* Explain how humanity has influenced and changed the natural environment


Lecture Notes (In Course Announcement)

Final Exam Due

* Participate in classroom discussion



Table of Contents

Policies


Please see the student handbook to reference all University policies. Quick links to frequently asked question about policies are listed below.


Drop/Withdrawal Policy

Plagiarism Policy

Extension Process and Policy


WRITING EXPECTATIONS

All written submissions should be submitted in a font and page set-up that is readable and neat. It is recommended that students try to adhere to a consistent format, which is described below.

  • Typewritten in double-spaced format with a readable style and font and submitted inside the electronic classroom (unless classroom access is not possible and other arrangements have been approved by the professor).

  • Arial 11 or 12-point font or Times New Roman styles.

  • Page margins Top, Bottom, Left Side and Right Side = 1 inch, with reasonable accommodation being made for special situations and online submission variances.


CITATION AND REFERENCE STYLE

Assignments completed in a narrative essay or composition format must follow a widely accepted citation style, such as APA, Turabian or MLA. Please refer to the Online Library for further examples, or contact the instructor with questions.


LATE ASSIGNMENTS

The point deductions for late work are 5 points a day per assignment – that is 5 points a day for each paper and/or discussion board answer. Please note that this means that after 3 days, a discussion board post is no longer worth any points. The reason for this is that late discussion board posts do not contribute to the discussion because most students do not go back to read and respond to old posts.


Additionally, late exams are charged 1 point per late minute. Therefore, after 100 minutes late, an exam is not worth any points. I do not offer make up exams. It is your responsibility, as a student, to make sure that you create a schedule that allows you enough time to submit all of your work on time. An examination only takes 1 hour and 10 minutes to complete, and you have a full week in which the exam is open to you.

Although most students know this already, it is important to make sure that you are aware that AMU/APUS runs on EASTERN STANDARD TIME. All due dates and times are based on EST.


DISABILITY ACCOMMODATIONS

This institution complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the World Wide Web Consortium’s (W3C) Universal Access Guidelines. Students with special needs should inform their individual instructors and the University’s student services staff.


NETIQUETTE

Online universities promote the advance of knowledge through positive and constructive debate--both inside and outside the classroom. Discussions on the Internet, however, can occasionally degenerate into needless insults and “flaming.” Such activity and the loss of good manners are not acceptable in a university setting--basic academic rules of good behavior and proper “Netiquette” must persist. Remember that you are in a place for the fun and excitement of learning that does not include descent to personal attacks, or student attempts to stifle the discussion of others.


  • Technology Limitations: While you should feel free to explore the full-range of creative composition in your formal papers, keep e-mail layouts simple. The Educator classroom may not fully support MIME or HTML encoded messages, which means that bold face, italics, underlining, and a variety of color-coding or other visual effects will not translate in your e-mail messages.

  • Humor Note: Despite the best of intentions, jokes and--especially--satire can easily get lost or taken seriously. If you feel the need for humor, you may wish to add “emoticons” to help alert your readers: ;-), : ), J


DISCLAIMER STATEMENT

Course content may vary from the outline to meet the needs of this particular group.


Table of Contents


Academic Services


ONLINE LIBRARY RESEARCH CENTER & LEARNING RESOURCES

The Online Library Resource Center is available to enrolled students and faculty from inside the electronic campus. This is your starting point for access to online books, subscription periodicals, and Web resources that are designed to support your classes and generally not available through search engines on the open Web. In addition, the Center provides access to special learning resources, which the University has contracted to assist with your studies. Questions can be directed to orc@apus.edu.


  • Charles Town Library and Inter Library Loan: The University maintains a special library with a limited number of supporting volumes, collection of our professors’ publication, and services to search and borrow research books and articles from other libraries.

  • Electronic Books: You can use the online library to uncover and download over 50,000 titles, which have been scanned and made available in electronic format.

  • Electronic Journals: The University provides access to over 12,000 journals, which are available in electronic form and only through limited subscription services.

  • Turnitin.com: Turnitin.com is a tool to improve student research skills that also detect plagiarism. Turnitin.com provides resources on developing topics and assignments that encourage and guide students in producing papers that are intellectually honest, original in thought, and clear in expression. This tool helps ensure a culture of adherence to the University's standards for intellectual honesty. Turnitin.com also reviews students' papers for matches with Internet materials and with thousands of student papers in its database, and returns an Originality Report to instructors and/or students.

  • Smarthinking: Students have access to 10 free hours of tutoring service per year through Smarthinking. Tutoring is available in the following subjects: math (basic math through advanced calculus), science (biology, chemistry, and physics), accounting, statistics, economics, Spanish, writing, grammar, and more. Additional information is located in the Online Research Center. From the ORC home page, click on either the “Writing Center” or “Tutoring Center” and then click “Smarthinking.” All login information is available.

Table of Contents


Selected Bibliography


Arenson, Lauren J. 1999. Learn by Doing: A Hands-on Approach for Physical Anthropology. Kendall/Hunt Pub. Co. ISBN: 0-7872-6291-9


Bogin, Barry. 1999. Patterns of Human Growth. Cambridge University Press. ISBN: 0-521-56438-7


Feder, Kenneth L. and Michael Alan Park. 2001. Human Antiquity: An Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology. Mcgraw-Hill Publishing Company. ISBN: 0-7674-1695-3


France, Diane L. 2004. Lab Manual and Workbook for Physical Anthropology. Thomson Learning. ISBN: 0-534-61506-6


Kappelman, John. 2003. Virtual Laboratories for Introductory Physical Anthropology CD-ROM (Software). Thomson Learning. ISBN: 0-534-53708-1


Molnar, Stephen. 2002. Human Variation: Races, Types, and Ethnic Groups. Pearson. ISBN: 0-13-033668-8

Peregrine, Peter N., Carol R. Ember, and Melvin Ember, Eds. 2002. Physical Anthropology: Original Readings in Method and Practice. Pearson. ISBN: 0-13-093979-X


Scully, Margaret. 2001. Selected Readings in Physical Anthropology. Kendall/Hunt Pub. Co. ISBN: 0-7872-8236-7

Stanford, Craig, Susan C. Anton, and John S. Allen. 2006. Biological Anthropology: The Natural History of Humankind - Text Only. Pearson. ISBN: 0-13-182892-4


Whitehead, Paul F. 2005. Photographic Atlas for Physical Anthropology. Morton Publishing Co. ISBN: 0-89582-572-4


Table of Contents

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