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3. Scholarship and Publication


Funding:


Principal Investigator, “The effects of a high fructose diet on brain and behavior. CDC/GSU Seed Grant Award for Social and Behavioral Science Research, 2007-2008, $59,964 (direct costs).


Co-investigator, “A multidisciplinary approach to learning,” Georgia State University Research Program Enhancement, 2005 – 2011, $150,000 (direct costs)


Principal Investigator, “The effects of a high fructose diet on hippocampal-dependent memory”. Georgia State University Brains and Behavior Program, 2007, $30,365 (direct costs).


Principal Investigator, “Neurochemical and behavioral effects of hyperglycemia,” NINDS-NIDDK-JDF (RO1 NS41173-02), 2000-2005, $650,000 (direct costs).


Principal Investigator, “The pathological effects of a high fructose diet on body weight and memory”. Georgia State University Brains and Behavior Program, 2005-2006, $30,000 (direct costs).


Publications (last five years):


  1. Crowder, N.A., Lehmann, H. Parent, M.B., & Wylie, D.R.W. (2003). The accessory optic system contributes to spatio-temporal tuning of motion-selective pretectal neurons. Journal of Neurophysiology. 90(2): 1140-51. Epub Dec 2002.

  2. Degroot, A. Kornecook, T. Quirion, R., De Bow, S., & Parent, M.B. (2003). Glucose increases hippocampal acetylcholine upon activation of septal GABA receptors. Brain Research, 979, 71-77.

  3. Lehman, H., Treit, D., & Parent, M.B. (2003). Spared anterograde memory for shock-probe fear conditioning after inactivation of the amygdala. Learning and Memory, 10, 261-269.

  4. Shah, A.A., & Parent, M.B. (2003). Septal infusions of glucose or pyruvate, but not fructose, produce avoidance deficits when coinfused with the GABA agonist muscimol. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 79, 243-251.

  5. Shah, A.A., & Parent, M.B. (2004). Septal infusions of glucose or pyruvate with muscimol impair spontaneous alternation. Brain Research, 996, 246-250.

  6. Parent, M.B. & Baxter, M.G. (2004). Septo-hippocampal acetylcholine: Involved in but not necessary for learning and memory? Learning and Memory, 11: 9-20.

  7. Krebs, D.L. & Parent, M.B. (2005). The enhancing effects of hippocampal infusions of glucose are not restricted to spatial working memory. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 83, 168-172.

  8. Krebs, D.L. & Parent, M.B. (2005). Hippocampal infusions of the glycolytic metabolite pyruvate reverse the memory-impairing effects of septal GABA receptor activation. European Journal of Pharmacology, 520, 91-99.

  9. Erickson, E.J, Watts, K. & Parent, M. B. (2006). Septal infusions of glucose with a GABA-B agonist impair memory. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 85, 66-70.

  10. Gore, J.B., Krebs, D.L., & Parent, M. B. (2006). Changes in blood glucose and salivary cortisol are not necessary for arousal to enhance memory in young or older adults. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 31, 589-600.

  11. Spetch, M.L. & Parent, M.B. (2006). Age and sex differences in children’s spatial search strategies. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 13(5), 807-812.

  12. Krebs-Kraft, D.L, Wheeler, M.G, & Parent M.B. (2007). The memory-impairing effects of septal GABA receptor activation involve GABAergic septo-hippocampal projection neurons. Learning and Memory, 14(12), 833-41.

  13. Krebs-Kraft, D.L & Parent M.B. (2008). Hippocampal infusions of glucose reverse memory deficits produced by co-infusions of a GABA receptor agonist. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 89(2), 142-152.

  14. Cisse, R.S. Krebs-Kraft, D.L & Parent M.B. (in press). Septal infusions of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (HCN-channel) blocker ZD7288impair spontaneous alternation but not inhibitory avoidance. Behavioral Neuroscience.


4. Professional Activities:


2003 – 2006: Chair, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neuroscience Program, Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia


2007- present: Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia

1. Name, rank, academic discipline, institutions attended, degrees earned

Aras Petrulis, Associate Professor, Psychology


Education:

BS: Arizona State University, Psychology, 1991

PhD: Cornell University, Psychology, 1998

Postdoctoral Fellow: Boston University, Psychology, 2002


2. Teaching load 2 courses/yr

PSYC 2050 Introduction to Drugs and Behavior

PSYC 4110 Physiological Psychology

PSYC 4560 Psychology of Animal Behavior

PSYC 8618 Advanced Behavioral Neuroscience

3. Scholarship and Publication


Funding:


1995 - 1997: National Institute of Health Pre-doctoral National Research Service Award

1998 - 2001: National Institute of Health Post-doctoral National Research Service Award

2003-2005: Principal Investigator: “The function of c-fos in sexual behavior”. Venture grant awarded by the NSF Center for Behavioral Neuroscience (IBN-9876754). $30,000.

2005-2009: Principal Investigator: “The neurobiology of social attraction and preference”. Grant awarded by NIMH (RO1 MH072930). $1,200,000.

2005-2006: Principal Investigator: “Neuroanatomy of Sexual Solicitation: Vaginal Marking in Female Golden Hamsters”. Seed grant awarded by the Brains and Behavior Initiative, GSU. $26,300.


Publications (last five years):


Petrulis, A. & Eichenbaum, H. (2003) Olfactory memory. In R. L. Doty (Ed.), Handbook of Olfaction and Gustation: Second Edition. (pp. 409-438). New York: Marcel Dekker.


Petrulis, A. & Eichenbaum, H. (2003) The perirhinal-entorhinal cortex, but not the hippocampus, is critical for expression of individual recognition in the context of the Coolidge effect. Neuroscience, 122, 599-607.


Petrulis, A., Weidner, M. & Johnston, R. E. (2004) Recognition of competitors by male golden hamsters. Physiology and Behavior, 81, 629-638.


Petrulis, A., Alvarez, P. & Eichenbaum, H. (2005) Neural correlates of social odor recognition and the representation of individual-distinctive social odors within entorhinal cortex and ventral subiculum. Neuroscience, 130, 259-274.


Petrulis, A. (2005) The neurobiology of odor-based sexual preference: the case of the Golden hamster. In R. T. Mason, M. P. LeMaster & D. Muller-Schwarze (Eds.), Chemical Signals in Vertebrates 10 (pp. 291-299). New York: Springer.


Maras, P. & Petrulis, A. (2006) Chemosensory and steroid-responsive regions of the medial amygdala regulate distinct aspects of opposite-sex odor preference in male Syrian hamsters. European Journal of Neuroscience, 24, 3541-3552.


Eidson, L., Maras, P., Epperson, E. & Petrulis, A. (2007) Female hamster preference for odors is not regulated by circulating gonadal hormones. Physiology and Behavior, 91, 134-141.


Maras, P. & Petrulis, A. (2007) The role of early olfactory experience in the development of adult odor preferences in rodents. In J. Hurst, R.J. Beynon, S.C. Roberts & T. Wyatt (Eds.), Chemical Signals in Vertebrates 11, (pp. 251-260). New York: Springer.


Been, L. & Petrulis, A. (2007) The neurobiology of sexual solicitation: vaginal marking in female Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). In J. Hurst, R.J. Beynon, S.C. Roberts & T. Wyatt (Eds.), Chemical Signals in Vertebrates 11, (pp. 231-239). New York: Springer.


Maras, P. & Petrulis, A. (2008) Olfactory experience and the development of odor preference and vaginal marking in female Syrian hamsters. Physiology and Behavior, in press.


Maras, P. & Petrulis, A. The role of the posteromedial cortical amygdala in generating sexual odor preference and copulatory behavior in male Syrian hamsters. submitted.


4. Professional Activities:

2006-present Chair, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neuroscience Program, Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA

1.  Name, rank, academic discipline, institutions attended, degrees earned;
Andrey Shilnikov, Associate Professor, Mathematics (dynamical systems and mathematical neuroscience)

Education:

Ph.D., Differential Equations incl. Mathematical Physics, University of Nizhny Novgorod, Russia, 1990.
Postdoc  Cambridge University, UK, 1994-1995 and UC Berkeley, 1993-94.

2.  Teaching load 4 courses/yr:

ODES

PDES

Calculus

Linear Algebra

1000 level Math

3.  Scholarship and publication record for past five years;

Channell P., Cymbalyuk G. and Shilnikov A. L., Origin of bursting through homoclinic spike adding in a neuron model, Phys. Rev. Letters98, 134101, 2007; doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.134101 [pdf] [gzip.ps]. Virtual Journal of Biological Physics, 3(7), 2007.

Channell P., Cymbalyuk, G. and Shilnikov, A. L., Applications of the Poincare mapping technique to analysis of neuronal dynamics, Neurocomputing, 70 (10-12), 2007; doi:10.1016/j.neucom.2006.10.091

Shilnikov L.P. and Shilnikov A.,  Shilnikov Bifurcation,  Scholarpedia, 2007, 2(8):1891.

Shilnikov A.L. and Turaev D., Blue Sky Catastrophe, Scholarpedia, 2006, 2(8):1889.

Shilnikov, A. L. and Cymbalyuk, G., Transition between tonic-spiking and bursting in a neuron model via the blue-sky catastrophe, Phys Review Letters, 94, 048101 (2005) and Virtual Journal of Biological Physics Research, February issue,
2005

Cymbalyuk, G. and Shilnikov, A. L. Co-existent tonic spiking modes in a leech neuron model, Journal of Computational Neuroscience 18 (3), 255-263, 2005

Shilnikov, A.L., Shilnikov, L.P. And Turaev, D.V. Blue sky catastrophe in singularly perturbed systems, AMS Moscow Mathematical Journal, 5(1), 205-218, 2005

Shilnikov, A. L., Calabrese R. and Cymbalyuk, G. How a neuron model can demonstrate coexistence of tonic spiking and bursting? Neurocomputing, 65-66, 869-875, 2005

Mira, C. and Shilnikov, A.L., Slow and fast dynamics generated by non-invertible plane maps, Bifurcations and Chaos 15(11), 2005

Shilnikov, A. L., Calabrese R. and Cymbalyuk, G. Mechanism of bi-stability: tonic spiking and bursting in a neuron model, Phys Review E 71(1), 205, 2005

Shilnikov, A. L. and Cymbalyuk, G. Homoclinic saddle-node orbit bifurcations en a V.3 route between tonic spiking and bursting in neuron models, Regular & Chaotic Dynamics 9 (3), 281-297, 2004

Shilnikov, A. L., Shilnikov, L.P. and Turaev, D.V. Mathematical aspects of classical synchronization theory. Tutorial. Bifurcations and Chaos 14(7), 2143-2160, 2004

Shilnikov, A.L. and Rulkov, N.F. Subthreshold oscillations in a map-based neuron model, Physics Letters A 328, 177-184, 2004

Shilnikov, A.L. and Rulkov, N.F. Origin of chaos in a two-dimensional map modeling spiking-bursting neural activity, Bifurcations and Chaos 13(11), 2003

4.  Professional activity;

Faculty of Center for Nonlinear Science at GaTech

Reviewer and referee for Nonlinearity, Phys Rev Letters, Physica D, Phys Rev E, J Comp Neuroscience, Bifurcations and Chaos, Regular and Chaotic Dynamics, Complexity IEEE J Circuits and Systems, SIAM J Applied Mathematics, SIAM J Dynamical Systems and all other major journals in the fields.

A co-organizer of a workshop Origin and rhythmogenesis of bursting, GSU Atlanta, 2006, April 6-8.
A co-organizer of a symposium Complex dynamics of systems with multiple time scales at SIAM Conference on Applications of Dynamical Systems, Salk Lake City, Utah, May 22-26, 2005
•A co-organizer of a symposium The Geometry of Spiking and Bursting at 2004 SIAM Conference on the Life Sciences. Portland, Oregon, July 11-14, 2004
• A co-organizer omini-symposium Bursting in Mappings at SIAM Conference on Applications of Dynamical Systems, Snowbird, Utah, May 27-31, 2003

1.  Name, rank, academic discipline, institutions attended, degrees earned;

Walter Wilczynski, Professor, Psychology


Education:

Lehigh University, BS/BA Psychology and Biology

University of Michigan, PhD Neuroscience

Cornell University, Postdoc, Neurobiology & Behavior


2. Current workload for typical semester:

Workload per semester is 50% administration (Co-director, Center for Behavioral Neuroscience), 30% Research, 20% Teaching:

Psyc 4110 (Physiological Psychology)


3. Scholarship and publication record for past five years;

Current funding:

2003-2007 NIMH Research Grant (2-R01 MH/DC57066): “Acoustic communication and hormone control”; $884,000 total costs; currently in no cost extension

2008-2012 National Science Foundation (0751573):”The interaction of social experience and hormone changes in modifying aggression” (renewal); $560,000 total costs

Two postdocs and one graduate student in my lab currently have individual NIH funded NRSA fellowships.


Publications last 5 years:

Wilczynski, W. (2008) Evolution, of the Brain: in Amphibians. In: A. B. Butler, ed. Encyclopedia Reference of Neuroscience. Springer, in press.

Lynch, K.S., and W. Wilczynski (2008) Reproductive hormones modify reception of species-typical communication signals in a female anuran. Brain Behav. Evol., 71:143–150.

Wilczynski, W., and H. Endepols (2007) Central auditory pathways in anuran amphibians: The anatomical basis of hearing and sound communication. In: A. N. Popper, A. S. Feng and P. N. Narins, eds. Hearing and Sound Communication in Amphibians: Springer Handbook of Auditory Research. Springer-Verlag, pp. 221-249.

Hoke, K.L., M. J. Ryan, and W. Wilczynski (2007) Functional coupling between substantia nigra and basal ganglia homologs in amphibians. Behav. Neurosci., 121:1393-1399.

Almli, L.M., and W. Wilczynski (2007) Regional distribution and migration of proliferating cell populations in the adult brain of Hyla cinerea (Anura, Amphibia). Brain Res., 1159:112 – 118.

Chu, J., and W. Wilczynski (2007) Apomorphine effects on frog locomotor behavior. Physiol. Behav., 91: 71-76.

Hoke, K.L., M. J. Ryan, and W. Wilczynski (2007) Integration of sensory and motor processing underlying social behaviour in túngara frogs. Proc. Royal Soc. Lond., 274: 641–649.

Yang, E.-J., and W. Wilczynski (2007) Social experience organizes parallel networks in sensory and limbic forebrain. J. Develop. Neurobiol., 67: 285–303.

Lynch, K.S., and W. Wilczynski (2006) Social regulation of plasma estrogen concentration in a female anuran. Horm. Behav., 50: 101-106.

Farrell, W. J., and W. Wilczynski (2006) Aggressive experience alters place preference in green anole lizards (Anolis carolinensis). Anim. Behav., 71: 1155-1164.

Lynch, K. S., D. Crews, M. J. Ryan and W. Wilczynski (2006) Hormonal state influences aspects of female mate choice in the túngara frog (Physalaemus pustulosus). Horm. Behav., 49: 450-457.

Wilczynski, W., K. S. Lynch, E. L. O’Bryant (2005) Current research in amphibians: Studies integrating endocrinology, behavior, and neurobiology. Horm. Behav., 48: 440-450.

Hoke, K.L., M. J. Ryan, W. Wilczynski (2005) Social cues shift functional connectivity in the hypothalamus. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA, 102: 10712-10717.

Singletary, K.G., Y. Delville, W. J. Farrell, W. Wilczynski (2005) Distribution of orexin/hypocretin immunoreactivity in the nervous system of the green treefrog, Hyla cinerea. Brain Res., 1041: 231– 236.

Lynch, K. S., and W. Wilczynski (2005) Gonadal steroid fluctuations in a tropically breeding female anuran. Gen. Comp. Endocrinol., 143: 51-56.

Witte, K., H. E. Harris, M.J. Ryan, and W. Wilczynski (2005) How cricket frog females deal with a noisy world: evidence for environmental selection on tuning. Behav. Ecol., 16:571–579.


4. Professional activity;

  • Co-Director for Research and Academic Programs, Center for Behavioral Neuroscience

  • Chair, Animal Resources Committee (Georgia State University)

  • Member, Psychology Dept. Executive Committee (Georgia State University)

  • Editor-in-Chief, Brain, Behavior and Evolution

  • Editorial Board member, Journal of Zoology

Associate Faculty


1. Name, rank, academic discipline, institutions attended, degrees earned;

Marina Arav, Associate Professor, Mathematics and Statistics


Education:

1990 - B.S., Applied Mathematics, Simferopol State University, Ukraine

1995 - M.S., Applied Mathematics, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

2000 - Ph.D., Applied Mathematics, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

2000 - Postdoc, Mathematics, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology.

2002 - Postdoc, Department of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin – Madison


2.  Teaching load 4 courses/yr:

Math 8200 Advanced Matrix Analysis

Math 8210 Topics in Applied Matrix Analysis


3.  Scholarship and publication record for past five years:

Internal and External Funding:

2004 Technology Fee Grant Program at Georgia State University, Mobile

Classroom for Teaching Mathematics and Statistics, with Drs. Vidakovic

(PI), Miller, Patterson, Shilnikov and Smirnova, November 15, 2004 –

November 14, 2005, $105,045.

2005 Travel to The 2005 International Haifa Matrix Theory Conference, funding

of The Center for Mathematical Sciences, Technion, Israel, January 3–7 ,

2005, $400.

2005 NSF–AWM Travel Grant for Women Researchers, for travel to The 2005 International Haifa Matrix Theory Conference in January 3–7, 2005, $500.

2005 European Science Foundation Grant, for travel expenses at the

conference: Personalized Medicine Europe: Health, Genes & Society

Tel–Aviv University, Tel–Aviv, Israel, June 19–21, 2005, $500.

2006 Research Initiation Grant, Georgia State University, “The Human

Olfactory Recognition using Boolean Matrix Factorization”, July 1, 2006 –

June 30, 2007, $10,000.

2006 NSF–AWM Mentoring Travel Grant for Women Researchers, “The Human Olfactory Recognition using Boolean Matrix Factorization”, March 1, 2006 –

February 28, 2007, $3,500.

2006 DIMACS (Center for Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer

Science), research visit grant, March 2–13, 2006, $1,500.

2006 Brains & Behavior Program Fellowship for my graduate studnet, Georgia State University, “3-D Reconstruction of Neuron Images”, July 1, 2006 – June 30, 2007, $11,000.

2007 Brains & Behavior Program Seed Grant, Georgia State University,

“Tunable 3 Dimensional Neuron Reconstruction from 2 Dimensional

Contours”, with S. Belkasim (PI), B. Antonsen, January 1, 2007 –

December 31, 2007, $29,440.

2007 Graduate student support from the above Brains & Behavior Seed Grant,

Georgia State University, “Nonnegative Matrix Factorization Algorithms

Applied to Neuron Images”, January 1, 2007 – June 30, 2007, $3,000.

2007 Brains & Behavior Program Fellowship for my graduate student, Georgia State University, “3-D Reconstruction of Neuron Images”, July 1, 2007 – June 30, 2008, $11,000.


Publication record for past five years:


M. Arav, Application Techniques of the Recursive Inverse Eigenvalue Problem

Solution Algorithm, Ideas, Projects and Technologies, ECI-S, 3, 2-8, 2004.


T. I. Seidman, H. Schneider, M. Arav, Comparison Theorems Using General

Cones for Norms of Iteration Matrices, Linear Algebra and Its Applications, 399,

169-186, 2005.

M. Arav, F. Hall, S. Koyuncu, Z. Li, and B. Rao, Rational Realizations of the

Minimum Rank of a Sign Pattern Matrix, Linear Algebra and Its Applications,

409, 111-125, 2005.

K. Hayashi, M. Arav, Bayesian Factor Analysis when Only a Sample Covariance

Matrix is Available, Educational and Psychological Measurement, 66, 272-284,

2006.


M. Arav, S. Reich, A. J. Zaslavski, A Note on the Minimization of Convex

Functions, International Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics, 32, 65-70,

2006.


M. Arav, F. E. Castillo Santos, S. Reich and A. J. Zaslavski, A Note on

Asymptotic Contractions, Fixed Point Theory and Applications, Volume 2007,

Article ID 39465, 1-6, 2007.


M. Arav, S. Reich and A. J. Zaslavski, Uniform Convergence of Iterates for a

Class of Asymptotic Contractions, Fixed Point Theory, Volume 8, No. 1, 3-9,

2007.


M. Arav, J. Bevis, F. J. Hall, Inherited LU-Factorizations of Matrices, Linear

Algebra and Its Applications, 427, 26-41, 2007.


M. Arav, Contour Approximation of Data and the Harmonic Mean, to appear in

Mathematical Inequalities and Applications, Volume 11, no 1, 2008.


M. Arav, F. J. Hall, Z. Li , A Cauchy-Schwarz Inequality for Triples of Vectors,

to appear in Mathematical Inequalities and Applications, Volume 11, no 1, 2008.


M. Arav, F. J. Hall, Z. Li, and B. Rao, Rational Solutions of Certain Matrix

Equations, submitted to Linear Algebra and Its Applications, under revision.


M. Arav, F. J. Hall, Z. Li, Assefa Merid and Yubin Gao, Sign Patterns that

Require Almost Unique Rank, submitted to Linear Algebra and Its Applications.


4.  Professional activity:

Honors, awards and recognition:


1999 “Distinguished Teaching Assistant” award, Technion, Israel.


2001 Visiting Researcher, Technion, Israel, summer 2001.


2002 Honorary Fellow at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, summer 2002.


2006 Visiting Researcher, DIMACS (Center for Discrete Mathematics and

Theoretical Computer Science), NJ, March 2-13, 2006.

1.  Name, rank, academic discipline, institutions attended, degrees earned:
Deborah
J. Baro, Associate Professor, Biology
 
Education:
B.S.                 1980                Biology                                                 University of Illinois
Ph.D.               1989                Biology (Moleccular Genetics)          University of Illinois
Postdoc            1989-92           Neurobiology & Behavior                   Cornell University
 
2. Teaching load:
 2 courses/yr
BIOL 4800/6800                     Principles of Cell Biology
BIOL 8220                              Advanced Cell Biology
 
3.  Scholarship and publication record for past five years

Funding
Current Awards
2007-2012       NIH/NIDA: R01DA024039, ($1,625,625 total costs; 1,125,000direct costs; 500,625, indirect costs), Mechanisms underlying opposing neuronal responses to brief vs. prolonged dopamine  PI: DJ Baro          
Awards Completed in the last 5 years
2006-2007       NSF: IOS-0733403                 ($5,000 total)               PI: DJ Baro
Dynamic Neural Networks Conference, San Diego, CA; November 2, 2007
2000-2006       NIH/NIGMS: GM08224         ($742,000 total)           PI: DJ Baro     
Different Phosphorylation States of A-channels in Pyloric Cells
2000-2004       NIH/NINDS: RO1 NS38770  ($942,791 total)           PI: DJ Baro
Mechanisms Underlying IA diversity
 
PEER REVIEWED JOURNAL ARTICLES
Soto I, Marie B, Baro DJ, Blanco RE (2003) FGF-2 modulates expression and distribution of GAP-43 in frog retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury. J Neurosci Res. 73(4):507-17
 
Clark MC, Dever TE, Dever JJ, Xu P, Rehder V, Sosa MA and Baro DJ (2004) Arthropod 5-HT2 receptors: A neurohormonal receptor in Decapod crustaceans that displays agonist independent activity resulting from an evolutionary alteration of the DRY motif. Journal of Neuroscience 24: 3421–3435.
 
Sosa MA, Spitzer N, Edwards DE, and Baro DJ (2004) A crustacean serotonin receptor: Cloning and distribution in the thoracic ganglia of crayfish and freshwater prawn.  Journal of Comparative Neurology 473: 526-537.
 
Clark MC and Baro DJ (2006) Cloning and characterization of crustacean type one dopamine receptors: D1aPan and D1bPan. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology-Part B: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 143:294-301.

 
Cui D, Dougherty KJ, Machacek DW, Sawchuk M, Hochman S, and Baro DJ (2006) Divergence between motoneurons: Gene expression profiling provides a molecular characterization of functionally discrete somatic and autonomic motoneurons. Physiological Genomics. Physiological Genomics, 24: 276-28
 
Clark MC and Baro DJ (2007) Arthropod D2 receptors positively couple with cAMP through the Gi/o protein family. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology-Part B: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 146: 9-19.
 
Brito MN, Brito NA, Baro DJ, Song CK, and Bartness TJ (2007) Differential activation of the sympathetic innervation of adipose tissues by melanocortin receptor stimulation. Endocrinology 148: 5339-47.
 
Clark MC, Khan R and Baro DJ (2007) Crustacean dopamine receptors: localization and G protein coupling in the Stomatogastric Ganglion (STG). J. Neurochem, 104:1006-19.
 
Spitzer N, Edwards DH and Baro DJ (2007) Conservation of structure, signaling and pharmacology between two sertotonin receptor subtypes from decapod crustaceans: Panulirus interruptus and Procambarus clarkii. Journal of Experimental Biology, 211: 92-105.
 
Spitzer N, Zhang H, Cymbalyuk G, Edwards DH, and Baro DJ (2008) Variable components of the pyloric network 5-HT response system generate unpredictable changes in cycle frequency in response to the same modulatory challenge. in revision for the Journal of Neurophysiology.
 
4. Professional activity:
Society Memberships
1989-present    Society for Neuroscience
2003-present    Society for Dynamic Neural Networks: The Stomatogastric System
2007                American Physiological Society
Society Offices
2002-2004             Council Member, Atlanta Society for Neuroscience
2006-2008             Treasurer, Society for Dynamic Neural Networks: The Stomatogastric
                              System

1. Name, rank, academic discipline, institutions attended, degrees earned;

Timothy J Bartness, Regents’ Professor, Biology

Education:

B.A. Luther College, Decorah, IA (1975)

M.A. Drake University, Des Moines, IA (1977)

Ph.D. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (1982)

Postdoc ??


2. Teaching Load 2 courses/yr

BIOL 8040/PSYC 8615 Functional Human Neuroanatomy

BIOL 8110 Energy Metabolism and Behavior

BIOL 6801/PSYC 6801 Survival Skills in Academia


3. Scholarship and Publications

GRANTS

CURRENTLY FUNDED-FEDERAL (last 5 years)

National Institutes of Health Research Grant R01 DK35254-24 "Photoperiodic Control of Obesity," 08/01/04-07/31/09, $1,057,500 (total direct costs).

National Institutes of Health Supplement to R01 DK35254 to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research for Dr. Cheryl Vaughan, postdoctoral), 07/01/06-06/90/09, $167,684 (total direct costs).

National Institutes of Health Research Grant R01 DK078358-01 “Peptidergic Control of Appetitive Ingestive Behaviors”, 03/15/07-03/14/11 $820,000.

National Science Foundation via Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, “Neurovirus Development”,Co-PI with Lynn W. Enquist, Princeton University, 06/01/03-05/31/08, $454,035 ($256,930 total direct costs to GSU).

CURRENTLY FUNDED-NON-FEDERAL (last 5 years)

Georgia State University: Faculty Mentoring Grant to Meera Penumetcha, “Dietary Oxidized Fatty Acids: A Role in Weight Regulation?” 06/01/06-07/01/07 $11,000 ($0 total direct costs to TJB).

Georgia State University Brains and Behavior Program, “The pathological effects of a high fructose diet on body weight and memory.” Marise Parent PI; 05/31/06-06/30/07, $30,365 (direct costs; $7,675 to TJB).


PREVIOUSLY FUNDED-FEDERAL (last 5 years)

National Science Foundation via Center for Behavioral Neuroscience PI with Co-PIs Ruth Harris (University of Georgia) and Andrew Clancy (Georgia State University) “Do gonadal fat lipid levels control reproductive status and behavior?”, 01/01/03 $30,000 total direct costs to GSU).

National Science Foundation via Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, Co-PI with Andrew Clancy (PI, GSU) and Larry Young (Emory) “The role of estrogen sensitive neurons in the medial amygdala on male rat sexual behavior” 09/01/02-08/30/03 $30,000 total direct costs to GSU).

Sponsor National Institutes of Health Research Supplements for Underrepresented Minority Graduate Research Assistants -- Supplement to Research Grant R01 DK35254 "Photoperiodic Control of Obesity" Michelle T. Foster 09/01/01-07/31/04 $63,000 (total direct costs).

National Science Foundation IBN 9876495 "Foraging Effort and Changes in Externally- and Internally-Stored Energy" 09/01/02-8/31/05 $297, 612 (total costs).

Sponsor National Institutes of Health Research Supplements for Underrepresented Minority Graduate Research Assistants -- Supplement to Research Grant R01 DK35254 "Photoperiodic Control of Obesity" Michelle T. Foster 08/01/04-07/31/05 $26,000 (total direct costs).

National Institutes of Health Research Grant RO1 DK21397-28 Co-PI with Harvey J. Grill (PI, University of Pennsylvania), Ruth Harris (Co-PI, University of Georgia) “Brainstem Control of White Adipose Tissue Lipid Mobilization and Brown Adipose Tissue Thermogenesis”, 09/01/04-08/31/05, $274,958 ($56,310 total direct costs to GSU).

National Science Foundation via Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, Mark Wilson (PI; Yerkes Regional Primate Ctr) Co-PIs with Ruth Harris (University of Georgia) and Donna Toufexis (Emory University), “Social Stress and Comfort Foods in Non-Human Primates”, 08/18/05-08/17/06, $29,769 direct costs ($0 to GSU).


PUBLICATIONS (last five years)

123 before 2003 (42 publications from 2003-present)

124. Day, D. E. and Bartness, T. J. Food deprivation increases postfast foraging and food hoarding, but not intake dependent on foraging effort. Physiology and Behavior, 78:655-668, 2003.

125. Williams, D. L., Bowers, R. R., Bartness, T. J., Kaplan, J.M. and Grill, H. J. Brainstem melanocortin 3/4 receptor stimulation increases uncoupling protein gene expression in brown fat. Endocrinology, 144: 4692-4697, 2003. *Editorial Focus Article
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