Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability Volume 24(3), Fall 2011




НазваниеJournal of Postsecondary Education and Disability Volume 24(3), Fall 2011
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Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability

Volume 24(3), Fall 2011

AHEAD (logo)

The Association on Higher Education And Disability

Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability

Volume 24(3)

Table of Contents


From the Editor 171 - 172

David R. Parker

Dedication to Dr. Lydia Block 173 - 174

Loring C. Brinckerhoff

Participation in Postsecondary Education for Students with

Intellectual Disabilities: A Review of the Literature 2001 - 2010 175 - 198

Colleen A. Thoma

K. Charlie Lakin

Dawn Carlson

Christine Domzal

Kira Austin

Kimberly Boyd

Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Well-being:

Is Social Impairment an Issue for College Students with ADHD? 199 - 222

Tom Buchanan

Curb Cuts in Cyberspace: Universal Instructional Design for Online Courses 223 - 247

Kavita Rao

Adam Tanners

Learning and Study Strategies of Students with Traumatic Brain Injury:

A Mixed Method Study 248 - 274

Erin Bush

Karen Hux

Samantha Zickefoose

Gina Simanek

Michelle Holmberg

Ambyr Henderson

PRACTICE BRIEF 275 - 280

“Accommodations for Multiple Choice Tests”

Jack Trammell

PRACTICE BRIEF 281 - 287

“Increasing Faculty Awareness of Students with Disabilities: A Two-Pronged Approach”

Michael Humphrey

Lee Woods

Linda Huglin

Review Board & Author Guidelines 288 - 292

From the Editor


DAVID R. PARKER

In times of change, what remains the same? As schools and campuses roar back to life after summer’s relative quiescence, the cyclical nature of our work begins anew. This issue of JPED includes a literature review, three research studies, and two Practice Briefs. The authors of these works bring insightful perspectives to our continuing efforts to minimize barriers, promote access, enhance effective learning and equitable test-taking, and build strategic partnerships. As we welcome new students into our academic communities, we must also say goodbye in this issue to a beloved colleague.


Thoma, Lakin, Carlson, Domzal, Austin, and Boyd review key findings from a decade of literature about postsecondary options for students with intellectual disabilities (ID). They broaden our understanding of who these students are and how growing numbers of campuses address their needs, often through special services outside the scope of degree programs. A new AHEAD White Paper offers another perspective (http://ahead.org/resources). This complex topic can generate strong reactions. Readers are invited to share reactions via letters to the editor.


Buchanan explores life inside and out of the classroom for students with ADHD. In his study of psychological well-being, the author found that undergraduates who self-reported ADHD identified greater difficulties with the organizational and goal-oriented demands of college life compared to peers without self-regulation impairments. More broadly, students with ADHD reported lower levels of well-being than peers who did not report an ADHD diagnosis. Buchanan’s survey research results in thoughtful considerations about the social life of students with ADHD.


Rao and Tanners present an innovative study of how college faculty can deliver online instruction with consideration of Universal Instructional Design (UID) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL). The authors also describe the use of technology such as Elluminate Live! to enhance access in online courses. Read what graduate-level students valued most about this pedagogy.


Bush, Hux, Zickefoose, Simanek, Holmberg, and Henderson invite us to reconsider the life experiences of postsecondary students with traumatic brain injury (TBI). This article seems particularly timely in an era of “wounded warriors.” The authors’ use of quantitative and qualitative data highlights the need for accurate self-awareness when students self-advocate.


In lieu of a book review, this issue concludes with two practice briefs that underscore the importance of partnerships between faculty, staff, and students. In the first, Trammel describes how to enhance the validity of multiple choice (MC) exams when assessing what students have learned. Read how a DS provider can consult with faculty and teach students MC strategies to achieve this goal. Humphrey, Woods, and Huglin report on the creation of a campus-wide partnership in their practice brief. They describe a unique collaboration between a DS office and faculty mentors to meet students’ needs while also influencing campus policies and procedures.

Finally, we must say goodbye to Lydia Block, who suddenly passed away this summer after living a most extraordinary life. Many JPED readers knew Dr. Block through her frequent presentations at AHEAD conferences, regional trainings, and long-time leadership on the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (NJCLD). Lydia’s untimely passing stands in sharp contrast to the lasting legacy she leaves behind. On the next few pages, read a poignant tribute from Loring Brinckerhoff.

Lydia S. Block Remembered (1951- 2011)


Loring C. Brinckerhoff

In 1981, Lydia Block was hired as a disability counselor at The Ohio State University (OSU). These were the very early days of postsecondary support services for students with learning disabilities (LD). At that time, the Disability Services Office at OSU was referred to as the Office for the Physically Impaired. Lydia was a trailblazer. For the next thirty years she opened doors to postsecondary opportunities for thousands of teenagers and young adults with learning disabilities and/or Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders (ADHD). Lydia became one of the foremost authorities in the country on students with LD and ADHD at the postsecondary level.


Lydia and I were on parallel career tracks back in 1983, when we first met. We were both enrolled in doctoral level programs and I had recently been hired at the McBurney Resource Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to tutor two or three newly identified students with dyslexia. We soon became close friends and our work intertwined with the Association on Handicapped Student Services in Postsecondary Education (AHSSPPE) in Columbus, OH along with Dr. Jane Jarrow. Jane, Lydia, Dr. Christy Lendman and I worked closely in organizing countless TRiO training workshops for service providers and counselors regarding first-generation college students with LD.

While at OSU, Lydia moved on to become the Coordinator and then Assistant Director of the University’s LD Services before establishing her own private consulting business in 1995 -- Block Educational Consulting. In this capacity, Lydia was able to reach-out to a national audience where she evaluated LD support services on college campuses, presented at countless “LD College Nights” at high schools, and helped high school guidance counselors and teachers see the opportunities and possibilities that were available to students with LD.


Lydia presented at workshops, webinars, and audio conferences as a contract employee with AHEAD and with other professionals, including Jane Jarrow. In 2004 she became the Director of the Disability Services Office at Capital University in Columbus, OH. In 2006, Lydia was hired at Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware, OH to serve as the Director of the Learning Resources Center. Recently, Lydia formed a service (Grade 13) through which she was able to provide her college search and guidance to parents and students via technology.


Lydia will always be remembered as a pioneer in our field who gave us three decades of leadership and dedication to enhancing the lives of persons with LD. Her practical writings, newsletters, and conference presentations gave high school parents new hope that their son/daughter might in fact be able to succeed in a competitive college setting. She promoted self-advocacy in students and became a crusader for students with LD who were often misconstrued as being “lazy” or “not college material.” Her research regarding foreign language learning and accommodations for students with LD in the postsecondary setting was groundbreaking. Her willingness to collaborate with others and her availability to answer questions about life after high school was renowned.

Lydia Block de-mystified learning disabilities for the layperson and expanded the knowledge base for countless colleagues and professionals. She also served on the Professional Advisory Board for the Learning Disability Association of America (LDA), the Board of Directors for AHEAD, as a representative to the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (NJCLD), and for the last twelve years as one of the review panel members at Educational Testing Service (ETS). In addition, she was a founding member, along with Patty Carlton and Wayne Cocchi, of the Transition and Communication Consortium on Learning Disabilities, an Ohio organization developed to provide resources, training and support to high school special education administrators and teachers.


Lydia leaves behind her parents, a brother, a sister, two daughters and her granddaughter, as well as countless friends and colleagues who looked to her for love, guidance and inspiration.


Loring C. Brinckerhoff, Ph.D., is Director of the Office of Disability Policy at Educational Testing Service (ETS) and a consultant to Harvard Medical School and Columbia University. Dr. Brinckerhoff is also a past president of AHEAD.
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