This course examines the causes, process and consequences of European integration since the Second World War




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NEW COURSE
NON-GENERAL EDUCATION

Proposal for New Course

Department __HIST, POSC, and PHIL_____ Date __2/9/09_________

_X___ Original Submission ____ Resubmission       Date of Original Submission________
                     Date of Implementation__Immediately (on schedule for Fall 2009)____

Retroactive? (If yes, please specify)__________________________________________

I.    New Proposed Course Information

Discipline Prefix ____HIST________________   Course Number ___430_____________

Course Title The History of European Integration Credit Hours ___3________

Prerequisite Course _____________________________________________________

Speaking Intensive _________________ Writing Intensive ________________

If Cross-Listed:

        Secondary Prefix ____________________ Course Number ________________

Course Description:   This course examines the causes, process and consequences of European integration since the Second World War. 3 credits.


 Please attach a proposed syllabus in SACS format

II.      Required for a Major, Minor, Concentration (please specify): elective

III.     Rationale for Course: Currently, our curriculum lacks any course in European History after 1945. This course presents students with an opportunity to explore the process of European integration more in depth. Dr. Pine offered this course when she taught at Longwood as part of a faculty exchange two years ago, and it was quite a success, leading one of our majors to go to graduate school in EU studies in the Netherlands.

IV.     Resource Assessment

          A.     How frequently do you anticipate offering this course? Once every two years

          B.     Describe anticipated staffing for the course, including any changes in existing
                   faculty assignments: Current faculty will teach this course.

          C.     Estimate the cost of required new equipment: None required

          D.     Estimated cost of and description of additional library resources: None required

          E.     Will this course require additional computer use, hardware or software? If so, please describe and estimate cost: None required


V.      Approvals

                                                Date Rec’d             Signature Date               Approved

1. Department Curriculum       __________         _______________         _____________
    Committee Chair

2. Department Chair                 __________         _______________         _____________
    The Department Chairs, whose programs may be affected, have been notified:

           Department __________________ Date Notified ____________

           Department __________________ Date Notified ____________

           Department __________________ Date Notified ____________

3. College Dean                        __________         _______________         _____________

4. College Curriculum              __________         _______________         _____________
    Committee

5. Educational Policy               __________         _______________         _____________
    Committee

6. Date received by Registrar     __________
 


Dr Melissa Pine

HIST 430: The History of European Integration

Fall 2009


Office: East Ruffner 227

Email: pinem@longwood.edu

Phone: 395-2215

Office Hours:


Course description:

This course examines the causes, process and consequences of European integration since the Second World War. 3 credits.


Course Overview:

This course examines the causes and development of European integration from 1945 to the present day. It analyzes the motivation for European states, including Britain, to pool and share sovereignty in new institutions, and asks what consequences that transfer of sovereignty has for the nation states involved.  It seeks to throw light upon the history of the principal institutions of European integration, and it examines the impact of these developments on individual member states; upon the region of Europe; and upon the wider world.


In other words, are the member states of the European Union building a United States of Europe, and if not, why? Is there a plan? If there is a plan, who wrote it? If not, what on earth are they doing over there? Who’s in charge? As Kissinger put it, when we want to talk to Europe, who do we call? Why were they unable to sort out Bosnia but so keen to make policy on the shape of bananas? And why does it all have to be so complicated, anyway? Why do the French love using their vetoes so much and so often? And what’s with the Brits? And the Poles? There are Poles now???


Promises and expectations

Usually each week the first class will be a lecture and the second a discussion session. PowerPoint slides will be posted on Blackboard before each lecture. This format means that you will have to listen to me talk…a lot. I will make my lectures as engaging, informative and passionate as I can. In return, I expect you to be engaged, informed, and passionate in discussion (hard as that may be when we are talking about the Common Agricultural Policy). Assignments vary from role-playing and presentation to more traditional written papers and exams. You may have to impersonate the prime minister of Slovenia, or discover the link between Altiero Spinelli and crocodiles. Not many people understand the European Union. I promise to make learning its history exciting, and expect you to enjoy it.




Texts:

Dinan, Desmond, Europe Recast: A History of the European Union, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004

Wallace, Helen and Wallace, William, Policy Making in the European
Union
, Oxford: OUP, 2000

Supplementary reading is suggested for each week.


Course objectives:

Upon completion of the course, students will have gained an appropriate increase in:

  • Knowledge and understanding of:

    • The causes of integration after 1945;

    • The history of the European Community and European Union from their birth to the present day;

    • The politics and policies of the European Union in historical perspective.

  • The ability to explain a range of key developments in the history of European integration in this period and relate them to an overall conception of the subject matter;

  • The ability to identify and organise material from appropriate secondary and primary sources and present them in essays etc using academic conventions;

  • The ability to evaluate critically the views of different historians on the topic;

  • The ability to organise material to produce, to a deadline, a coherent and cogent argument.



Class schedule:


Week One Introduction to post-war Europe and the Cold War context


1. Welcome and introduction

2. Europe in 1945


Readings: Dinan pp1-22


Week Two The origins of European integration

1. The origins of the European movement

2. The ‘founding fathers’ discussion: the role of Jean Monnet


Readings: Dinan pp22-24

If you have French: http://www.jean-monnet.net/


Week Three False starts and red herrings: the defence treaties and Marshall Aid

1. The defence treaties of the 1940s

2. Discussion on Marshall Aid: why was the US interested in Western Europe?


Readings: Dinan pp25-37

Trachtenberg, Marc, and Gehrz Christopher, ‘America, Europe, and German Rearmament, August-September 1950: A critique of a Myth’, JEIH, Volume 6, Number 2, 2000, p.9

Or, for balance: Zubok, Vladislav, ‘The Soviet Union and European Integration from Stalin to Gorbachev’, JEIH, Volume 2, Number 1, 1996, p.85


Week Four The Schuman Plan

1. From dismembering Germany to rebuilding Germany

2. Discussion: what’s in it for us? Why did different states participate?


Readings: Dinan pp37-56

Lord, Christopher, ‘"With but not of": Britain and the Schuman Plan, a Reinterpretation’, JEIH, Volume 4, Number 2, 1998, p.23


Week Five The Pleven Plan and NATO

1. The question of rearming Germany

2. The solution: EDC, WEU and NATO


Readings: Dinan p57-63


Week Six The Treaties of Rome

1. The Messina process

2. Discussion: sovereignty and ‘high politics’


Readings: Dinan pp64-96, 104-124

Hoffmann, Stanley (1966) ‘Obstinate or Obsolete? The Fate of the Nation-State and the Case of Western Europe.’ Dædalus, vol. 95 (2) 862-915


Week Seven The British u-turn: from sabotage to applications

1. EFTA

2. Discussion: British foreign policy making in the 1950s and 1960s


Readings: Dinan pp97-103, 135-144

Kaiser, Wolfram, ‘Challenge to the Community: the Creation, Crisis and Consolidation of the European Free Trade Association, 1958-72’,JEIH, Volume 3, Number 1, 1997, p.7

Maurhofer, Roland, ‘Revisiting the Creation of EFTA: the British and the Swiss case, JEIH Volume 7, Number 2, 2001, p. 65

Rees, Wyn G., ‘British Strategic Thinking and Europe, 1964 – 1970’, JEIH, Volume 5, Number 1, 1998, p. 57


Week Eight The British applications

1. 1963 and 1967

2. Discussion: enlargement. Where does ‘Europe’ end?


Readings: Dinan pp135-144

The Rees article above, if you didn’t read it last week.


Week Nine From the Hague Summit through the 1970s

1. The Hague Summit

2. New developments in the 1970s. Discussion: the question of stagnation


Readings: Dinan pp125-134, 145-204

JEIH Special edition on The Hague: Vol 9, no 2, 2003 (available online: see below)


Week Ten The Single European Act and the Maastricht, Amsterdam and Nice Treaties

1. The SEA

2. Maastricht, Amsterdam and Nice


Readings: Dinan pp205-264, 283-295


Week Eleven The European institutions

1. The European Commission and the Council of Ministers

2. The European Parliament and the European Court of Justice


Readings: Wallace and Wallace, pp3-38


Week Twelve Policies of the European Union (students will choose the specific topics for this week)

1. Pillar One

2. Pillar Two


Readings: PICK ONE CHAPTER from Wallace and Wallace, part II

Ludlow, N. Piers, ‘The Making of the CAP: Towards a Historical Analysis of the EU’s First Major Policy’, Contemporary European History, Volume 14, Issue 03, August 2005, pp 347-371


Week Thirteen What is the European Union?

1. Pillar Three

2. Discussion: what is the EU? Is it a federal state?


Readings: relevant chapter from Wallace and Wallace, part II


Week Fourteen The Turkish question

1. Discussion: the issues of the Turkish enlargement

2. Discussion: should Turkey be allowed to join the EU?


Reading: Dinan

Önis, Ziya, ‘An Awkward Partnership: Turkey's Relations with the European Union in Comparative-Historical Perspective’, in JEIH Volume 7, Number 1, 2001, p. 105


Course Requirements:


Short paper: 20%

Long paper: 50%

Final exam: 30%


A short paper, a long paper and a final exam are the requirements for this course. Failure to complete any of the requirements will be regarded as a failure to complete the course, and will therefore result in a failing grade. All students are expected to discuss their paper topic and projected bibliography with the instructor: suggested questions will be circulated, but students may design their own question with the permission of the instructor. Papers received in the week after the due date will be marked down up to one full grade: later papers will not be accepted. If a student, without gaining prior consent, is unable to turn in an assignment or take a test or exam because of sudden illness or some other extraordinary event, the instructor must be notified immediately.


1. Report: the Founding Fathers of Europe 20%

The first assignment for this class, due at the start of class TBA, is a report on the Founding Fathers of the European Union. It should be 6-8 pages long, double-spaced, and must be fully referenced. You may wish to consider the following questions (but you do not have to cover them all):

  • Who were the ‘Founding Fathers’ of the European Union?

  • Did any one of them play a dominant or most significant role in the beginnings of European integration? Who should be on the money, so to speak?

  • Did the European Founding Fathers play as significant a role in the origins of European integration as the American Founding Fathers did in the origin of the United States?


2. Paper 50%

The second assignment, due at the start of class TBA, is a 10-12 page research paper. A list of questions, and advice on how to proceed, will be distributed shortly. You may also write your own question, but MUST CLEAR IT WITH DR PINE before you start work. The questions are framed in order to enable you to form a reasoned argument in responding. There is little room for narrative: instead, analysis is the name of the game. The paper must be fully referenced. We will spend some time in class discussing my expectations – another good reason to attend class!


Because this paper is worth 50% of your grade, we will take it in stages.

  • By the start of class on Thursday, TBA, post your question and proposed bibliography on Blackboard (a designated folder will be created).

  • By the start of class on TBA, post a detailed plan for your paper.

  • By the start of class on TBA, post your comments on your Buddy’s plan: constructive suggestions about structure, content and reading please.


These postings are not worth credit in themselves. HOWEVER, if you do not post, I will deduct 10% for each missing post from your final grade. If you fail to post your bibliography, plan and comments, therefore, it is still possible to pass the assignment, but your grade will be capped at a C.


3. Final exam 30%

The final exam will be the only exam taken in the classroom (at the time indicated on the final exam schedule) and will consist of two short essays. I will be looking for an organized and analytical approach to the material presented in lectures, the assigned readings, and the discussions. Taking careful notes in class and on the readings, therefore, is strongly recommended.


Grading: the assignments are weighted as shown above. I do not grade on a curve. Grades are as follows:

97-100 A+

93-96 A

90-92 A-

87-89 B+

83-86 B

80-82 B-

77-79 C+

73-76 C

70-72 C-

67-69 D+

63-66 D

60-62 D-

0-59 F


Attendance policy


Students are expected to attend and to be well prepared for class. No register will be taken. However, participation in discussion and debate will be used to determine borderline grades. Moreover, students who show no signs in their written work of having absorbed ideas discussed in class can expect to receive low grades. Religious holidays and certain university sports events form an exception to the attendance policy: please let me know as close as possible to the start of term if your attendance is going to be affected in these ways.


Honor Code


All work must be pledged.


Extensions and extra credit


Extensions will not normally be permitted; however, Dr Pine is a softie and will consider individual cases – with very good reasons.


N.B. Electronic excuses will NEVER be accepted as a reason for an extension. I have to back up all my work, and so do you. Use an external hard drive, or a memory disc, or a CD, or keep a print out, or e-mail a copy to your mother, or bury one in your garden in the dead of night when the moon is waxing. One way or another, BACK UP YOUR WORK. Your computer crashing, printer malfunctioning, dog peeing on your memory stick etc will not be accepted as excuses for failing to hand in on time.


There is no extra credit in the usual sense. You may rewrite your report and/or your paper in a quest for a higher grade, in discussion with me. I will endeavour to return your work as quickly as possible to give you the opportunity to rewrite if you so choose. Note: a higher grade is not guaranteed.

Bibliography:

References required of all students:

Dinan, Desmond, Europe Recast: A History of the European Union, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004

Wallace, Helen and Wallace, William, Policy Making in the European
Union
, Oxford: OUP, 2000

Other general reading:

Cameron, Fraser, The Future of Europe: Integration and Enlargement, London: Routledge, 2004


Dinan, Desmond, Europe Recast: A History of the European Union, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004


Fursdon, Edward, The European Defence Community: a history, London: Macmillan, 1980


Gillingham, J, Coal, Steel and the Rebirth of Europe, 1945-1955, Cambridge: CUP, 1991


Milward, Alan S, The Reconstruction of Western Europe, 1945-51, London: Routledge, 1992


Stirk, Peter, A History of European integration since 1914, London: Continuum, 1996


Stubb, Alexander and Brent Nelson (eds), The European Union : readings on the theory and practice of European integration, Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1998


Wallace, Helen and Wallace, William, Policy Making in the European Union, Oxford: OUP, 2000


Wallace, William, The Transformation of Western Europe, London: Pinter, 1990


Young, John W, Britain and European Unity, 1945-1999, Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2000


More specific works

Artis, Mike, and Frederick Nixson, (eds.), The Economics of the European Union, 2001

Baldwin, R., JF Francois, and R. Portes, EU Enlargement, 1997

Calleo, David P., Rethinking Europe’s Future, 2001

Carlsnaes, Walter, et al., (eds.), Contemporary European Foreign Policy, 2004

Cremona, Marise, (ed.), The Enlargement of the European Union, 2003

De Gaulle, Charles, Memoirs of Hope: Renewal and Endeavour, 1971

Deighton, Anne and Alan S. Milward (eds.), Widening, Deepening and Acceleration: the EEC, 1957-1963, 1999

Deutsch, Karl W., et al., Political Community and the North Atlantic Area, 1957

De Witte, Bruno, (ed.), Ten Reflections on the Constitutional Treaty for Europe, 1999

Duchene, Francois, Jean Monnet: The First Statesman of Interdependence, 1994

Friend, Julius W., The Linchpin: French-German Relations 1950-1990, 1991

Galtung, Johann, The EC, A Super Power in the Making, 1973

Griffiths, Richard, and S. Ward (eds.), Courting the Common Market: the first attempt to enlarge the EEC, 1996

Hill, Christopher (ed.), The Actors in Europe’s Foreign Policy, 1996

Haas, Ernst B., The Uniting of Europe: Political, Social and Economic Forces, 1950-1957, 1958 (or new 2004 edition)

Hayward, Jack and Anand Menon (eds.), Governing Europe, 2003

Ludlow, Piers, Dealing with Britain: the Six and the first UK application to the EEC, Cambridge: CUP, 1997

Luif, Paul, On the Road to Brussels: The Political Dimension of Austria’s, Finland’s, and Sweden’s Accession to the EU, 1995

Milward, Alan, The European Rescue of the Nation-State, 1992

Monnet, Jean, Memoirs, 1978

Parsons, Craig, A Certain Idea of Europe, 2003

Schmitter, Philippe C., How to Democratise the European Union—and Why Bother?, 2000

Smith, Karen E., The Making of EU Foreign Policy, 2004

Stirk, Peter and Willis, David (eds.), Shaping Postwar Europe, 1945-1957, 1991

Tsoukalis, Loukas, The European Community and Its Mediterranean Enlargement, 1981

Vaughan, Richard, Postwar Integration in Europe, (Documents), 1976

Weiler, Joseph H. H., The Constitution of Europe, 1999

Wilkes, George, (ed.), Britain’s Failure to Enter the European Community, 1961-6: The Enlargement Negotiations and Crises in European, Atlantic, and Commonwealth Relations, 1997

Zielonka, Jan, Europe Unbound: Enlarging and Reshaping the Boundaries of the European Union, 2002

Zielonka, Jan, (ed.), Paradoxes of European Foreign Policy, 1998

Journals

All of the following journals contain useful scholarly articles for this course.

The Journal of European Integration History (available online at http://www.jeanmonnetprogram.org/TOC/search.php?pagemode=journallisting&PHPSESSID=e7fe82e6f4afdd0be82d97686930315c)

The Journal of Common Market Studies

Cold War History

Contemporary European History

You should also consult the bibliographies in the required texts and the library catalogue.

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