East Asia in the Post-Cold War Era




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Ohio State University / Spring 2003 International Studies 501

East Asia in the Post-Cold War Era


Issues in Regional Security & Economic Development

Class Hours & Location: T R 9:30 – 11:18 / Room 110, Jennings Hall

Instructor: Young-Bae HWANG, Visiting Professor

Office/Phone/email: Mershon Center 001 (1501 Neil Avenue) / 292-1631 / hwang.106@osu.edu

Office Hours: T R 1:30 - 2:30 pm (and by appointment)


Course Description: The purpose of this course is to acquaint us with and to analyze East Asian regional security as well as economic issues in the post-Cold War era. While we look at the region as an international subsystem, we will focus on the interaction between the regional level and its global consequences. First, we will discuss the various theoretical perspectives on East Asian studies with special emphasis on geopolitics, economic geography, and cultural approaches. Second, we will examine the recent issues on regional security, such as Chinese-Taiwanese conflict, alliances, arms race, and North Korean nuclear problems. Finally, we will consider the economic, financial, and developmental issues in this region, including models of economic growth, trade policies, and recent financial crises.


Course Requirements: This course has three requirements. First, although the format of the class is not a seminar, students are expected to participate actively during the class discussion. Second, students are required to write a research design (or proposal, 3-5 pages). It should address some issues of direct relevance to this class and it is encouraged to submit a rough draft before the due date (by the end of sixth week), so it can be revised and resubmitted. Presentation (15-20 minutes) should include the main ideas and the relevant examples of the issue. Third, a final paper (15-20 pages) based on your research design is required. The proportions of these requirements to the final grade are as follows:


Participation & Attendance 20%

Research Design/Proposal 20%

Presentation 20%

Final Paper 40%


Course Readings: There is no single source of reading materials for this class. Instead, copies of the required and the recommended reading are reserved at the Main Library. Optional readings are available from the instructor.


Course Schedule & Topics:

Week

Lecture & Discussion Topics

Part I. East Asian Studies: Introduction & Theoretical Approaches

(1) Week 1

Course Introduction / Why East Asia?

(2)

Geopolitics & East Asian Studies

(3) Week 2

Economic Geography & East Asian Studies

(4)

Cultural Approaches to East Asia

Part II. Regional Security Issues: Theories & Case Studies

(5) Week 3

Power Politics I: Balance of Power & Systemic Approach

(6)

Power Politics II: Power Transition & Dyadic Approach

(7) Week 4

Arms Race & Rivalry: A Deadly Triangle?

(8)

Alliance Politics: Bilateral, Multilateral & Collective Security

(9) Week 5

Case Study I: China as the Next Hegemon?

(10)

Case Study II: One China Policy & Taiwan

(11) Week 6

Case Study III: Japan as Strategic Partner

(12)

Case Study IV: North Korean Nuclear Crisis

Part III. Regional Economic Issues: Theories & Case Studies


(13) Week 7

East Asian Models of Economic Growth: Government vs. Market

(14)

Industrial Strategies: Export-orientation vs. Import-substitution

(15) Week 8

Case Study I: Lessons from South Korea & Taiwan

(16)

Case Study II: Chinese Reform & Growth Potentials

(17) Week 9

Case Study III: Japanese Boom & Bust

(18)

Case Study IV: Recent Economic & Financial Crisis

(19) Week 10

Presentation I

(20)

Presentation II

Course Readings: Required(***), Recommended(*), and Optional(*)


Part I. East Asian Studies: Introduction & Theoretical Approaches

(1) Week 1 Course Introduction / Why East Asia?

*** (this syllabus)


(2) Week 1 Geopolitics & East Asian Studies

*** Zbigniew Brzezinski (1997) "Hegemony of a New Type"/ “The Far Eastern Anchor” in The Grand Chess-board: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (New York: Basic Books) pp.3-29/151-193.

** Michael T. Klare (2001) “The New Geography of Conflict” Foreign Affairs 80(3): 49-61.

* Klaus Dodds (2000) “Contemporary Geopolitics” in Geopolitics in a Changing World (New York: Prentice Hall) pp.9-28.

* Saul B. Cohen (1999) "Geopolitics in the New World Era: A New Perspective on an Old Discipline" in George J. Demko and William B. Wood, eds., Reordering the World: Geopolitical Perspectives on the 21st Century (Boulder, CO: Westview) pp.40-68.

* Peter J. Taylor (1993) “Geopolitics Revived” in Political Geography: World-Economy, Nation-State and Locality (New York: Longman Scientific & Technical) pp.50-102.

* Paul F. Diehl (1992) “Geography and War: A Review and Assessment of the Empirical Literature” in Michael Don Ward, ed., The New Geopolitics (Philadelphia, PA: Gordon and Breach) pp.121-137.


(3) Week 2 Economic Geography & East Asian Studies

*** Ralph A. Cossa and Jane Khanna (1997) "East Asia: Economic Interdependence and Regional Security" International Affairs 73(2): 219-234.

** Robert Gilpin (2001) “New Economic Theories” in Global Political Economy: Understanding the International Economic Order (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University) pp. 117-122.

* Ash Amin and Nigel Thrift (1997) "Globalization, Socio-Economics, Territoriality" in Roger Lee and Jane Wills, eds., Geographies of Economies (New York: John Wiley and Sons) pp.147-157.

* Paul Hirst (1997) “The Global Economy – Myths and Realities” in International Affairs 73(3): 409-425.

* Paul Krugman (1995) "Geography Lost and Found" in Development, Geography, and Economic Theory (Cambridge, MA : MIT Press) pp.31-65.

* Paul Krugman (1991) Geography and Trade (Cambridge, MA: MIT).

(4) Week 2 Cultural Approaches to East Asia

*** Samuel P. Huntington (1996) "The West Unique, Not Universal" Foreign Affairs 75(6): 28-46.

** Jacob Heilbrunn (1998) "The Clash of Samuel Huntington" The American Prospect 39: 22-28.

* Samuel P. Huntington (1998) "Economics, Demography, and the Challenger Civilization" in The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (New York: Simon & Schuster) pp.102-121.

* Marc Howard Ross (1997) "Culture and Identity in Comparative Political Analysis" in Mark Irving Lichbach and Alan S. Zuckerman, eds., Comparative Politics: Rationality, Culture, and Structure (New York, NY: Cambridge University) pp.42-80.

* Thomas M. Magstadt (1998) "Comparative Politics and the Regional Perspective" in Nations and Governments: Comparative Politics in Regional Perspective (New York: St. Martin's Press) pp.3-26.


Part II. Regional Security Issues: Theories & Case Studies


(5) Week 3 Power Politics I: Balance of Power & Systemic Approach

*** Kenneth N. Waltz (2000) "Structural Realism after the Cold War" International Security 25: 5-41.

** Samuel P. Huntington (1999) "The Lonely Superpower" Foreign Affairs 78(2): 35-49.

* G John Ikenberry (1996) "The Myth of Post-Cold War Chaos" Foreign Affairs 75(3): 79-91.

* Frank W. Wayman and Paul F. Diehl (1994) "Realism Reconsidered: The Realpolitik Framework and Its Basic Propositions" in Frank W. Wayman and Paul F. Diehl, eds., Reconstructing Realpolitik (Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan) pp.3-28.

* Kenneth N. Waltz (1993) "The Emerging Structure of International Politics" International Security 18:44-79.

* Stephen Pelz (1991) "Balance of Power" in Michael J. Hogan and Thomas G. Paterson, eds., Explaining the History of American Foreign Relations (New York: Cambridge University Press) pp.111-140.

(6) Week 3 Power Politics II: Power Transition & Dyadic Approach

*** Jacek Kugler, Douglas Lemke and Ronald L. Tammen (2000) “Power Transition Theory for the 21st Century” in Jacek Kugler, ed., Power Transitions: Strategies for the 21st Century (New York: Chatham House) pp.3-43.

** William C. Wohlforth (1999) “The Stability of a Unipolar World” International Security 24: 5-41.

* Young-Bae Hwang & Jacek Kugler (1997) "The Likelihood of Major War in East Asia and Transition on the Korean Peninsula" Asian Perspective 21: 41-62.

* Indra de Soysa, John R. Oneal and Yong-Hee Park (1997) "Testing Power-Transition Theory Using Alternative Measures of National Capabilities" Journal of Conflict Resolution 41: 509-528.

* Jacek Kugler and Douglas Lemke (1996) "The Evolution of the Power Transition Perspective" in Parity and War: A Critical Evaluation of the War Ledger (Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan) pp.3-33.

* Robert Gilpin (1988) "The Theory of Hegemonic War" in Robert I. Rotberg and Theodore K. Rabb, eds., The Origin and Prevention of Major Wars (New York: Cambridge University) pp.15-37.


(7) Week 4 Arms Race & Rivalry: A Deadly Triangle?

*** Kent E. Calder (1996)"Arms Race Asia?"/"The Northeast Asian Arc of Crisis" in Asia's Deadly Triangle: How Arms, Energy, & Growth Threaten to Destabilize Asia-Pacific (Sonoma, CA: Nicholas Brealey) pp.1-42.

** Michael T. Klare (1993) "The Next Great Arms Race" Foreign Affairs 72(3): 136-152.

* Mitsuyu Kurosawa (1998) "Regional Security and Nuclear Weapons in Northeast Asia: A Japanese Perspective" in Bjorn Moller, ed., Security, Arms Control and Defense Restructuring In East Asia (Brookfield, VT: Ashgate) pp.93-108.

* Taehyun Kim (1995) "Putting Muzzles on the Dragons: Military Buildups and Regional Security in East Asia" in Jonathan D. Pollack and Hyun-Dong Kim, eds., East Asia's Potential for Instability and Crisis (Santa Monica, CA: Center for Asia-Pacific Policy, RAND) pp.75-95.

* Keith Krause (1992) "An Overview of the Post-1945 Global Arms Transfer System" in Arms and the State: Patterns of Military Production and Trade (New York: Cambridge University) pp.81-98.

* Michael D. McGinniss (1990) "A Rational Model of Regional Rivalry" International Studies Quarterly 34:111-135.


(8) Week 4 Alliance Politics: Bilateral, Multilateral & Collective Security

*** Joseph S. Nye, Jr. (1995) "The Case for Deep Engagement" Foreign Affairs 74(2): 90-102.

** Chalmers Johnson and E.B. Keehn (1995) "The Pentagon's Ossified Strategy" Foreign Affairs 74(2): 103-114.

* Hyung-Kook Kim (2001) “Multilateral Approaches to the Korean Peace Process” in Seung-Ho Joo & Tae-Hwan Kwak, op. cit, pp.151-179.

* Victor D. Cha (1999) "Conclusion: Quasi Allies or Adversaries in the Post-Cold war Era?" in Alignment Despite Antagonism: The United States-Korea-Japan Security Triangle (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press) pp.199-232.

* Doug Bandow (1996)"The Costs of Commitment" in Tripwire: Korea and U.S. Foreign Policy in a Changed World (Washington, DC: CATO Institute) pp.33-55.

* James D. Morrow (1991) "Alliances and Asymmetry: An Alternative to the Capability- Aggregation Model of Alliances" American Journal of Political Science 35: 904-933.

* Todd J. Christensen and Jack Snyder (1990) "Chain Gangs and Passed Buck: Predicting Alliance Patterns in Multipolarity" International Organization 44: 137-168.

* Stephen M. Walt (1987) "Explaining Alliance Formation" in The Origins of Alliances (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University) Ch. 2.


(9) Week 5 Case Study I: China, the Next Hegemon?

*** Gerald Segal (1999) "Does China Matter?" Foreign Affairs 78(5): 24-36.

** Richard Bernstein and Ross H. Munro (1997) "China: The Coming Conflict with America" Foreign Affairs 76(2): 18-32.

* Brad Roberts, Robert A. Manning, & Ronald N. Montaperto (2000) “China: The Forgotten Nuclear Power“

Foreign Affairs 79(): .

* Chalmers Johnson (2000) “China: The State of Revolution” /”China: Foreign Policy, Human Rights, & Trade” in Blowback: The Costs & Consequences of American Empire (New York: Henry Holt & Co.) pp.137-174.

* Jianwei Wang (1998) "China's Perception of the Post-Cold War International Environment" in Xiaobing Li, Xiabo Hu, Yang Zhong, eds., Interpreting U.S.-China-Taiwan Relations: China in the post-Cold War Era (Lanham, MD: University Press of America) pp.257-272.

* Norman Friedman (1997) "Chinese Military Capacity: Industrial and Operational Weakness" in Eric Arnett, ed., Military Capacity and the Risk of War: China, India, Pakistan, and Iran (New York: Oxford University Press) pp.61-75.

* Nicholas D. Kristof (1993) "The Rise of China" Foreign Affairs 72(5): 59-74.

* Henry Kissinger (1994) "The New World Order" in Diplomacy (New York: Simon & Schuster) pp.17-28.


(10) Week 5 Case Study II: One China Policy & Taiwan

*** Robert S. Ross (2002) “Navigating Taiwan Strait: Deterrence, Escalation Dominance, and US-China Relations” International Security 27:48-85.

** Kurt M. Campbell & Derek J. Mitchell (2001) “Crisis in the Taiwan Strait” Foreign Affairs 80(4): 14-25.

* Michael O’Hanlon (2000) “Why China Cannot Conquer Taiwan” International Security 25: 51-86.

* Dennis Van Vranken Hickey (1997) "Taiwan's Security Strategy: Policies, Options, and Prospects" in Taiwan's Security in the Changing International System (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner) pp.37-55.

* Lee Lai To (1997) "East Asian Assessments of China's Security Policy" International Affairs 73(2): 251-262.

* Tse-Kang Leng (1996) "An Overview of Taiwan's China Policy" in The Taiwan-China Connection: Democracy and Development across the Taiwan Straits (Boulder, CO: Westview) pp.37-54.

* Masashi Nishihra (1996) "China and East Asia" in Gerald Segal and Richard H. Yang, eds., Chinese Economic Reform: The Impact on Security (New York: Routledge) pp.128-140.


(11) Week 6 Case Study III: Japan as Strategic Partner

*** Brian Bridges (1998) "Japan: Hesitant Superpower" in Partha S. Ghosh, ed., Rivalry and Revolution in South and East Asia (Brookfield, VT: Research Institute for the Study of Conflict and Terrorism, Ashgate) pp.225-253.

** Chalmers Johnson (2000) “Japan and the Economics of American Empire” in Blowback: The Costs & Consequences of American Empire (New York: Henry Holt & Co.) pp.175-192.

* Mike M. Mochizuki (1997) "A New Bargaining for a Stronger Alliance" in Toward a True Alliance: Restructuring U.S.-Japan Security Relations (Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press) pp.5-40.

* Bruce Stokes (1996) "Divergent Paths: US-Japan Relations towards the Twenty-First Century" International Affairs 72(2): 281-292.

* Richard J. Samuels (1994) "The Strategic Relationship of the Military and Civilian Economies" in Rich Nation, Strong Army: National Security and the Technological Transformation of Japan (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press) pp.1-32.

* Paul Kennedy (1994) "Japan: A Twenty-first-Century Power" in Craig Garby and Mary Brown Bullock, eds., Japan: A New Kind of Superpower? (Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson Center Press) pp.193-199.


(12) Week 6 Case Study IV: North Korean Nuclear Crisis

*** Victor Cha (2002) “Hawk engagement and Preventive Defense on the Korean Peninsula” International Security 27:40-78.

** James T. Laney & Jason T. Shaplen (2003) “How to Deal with North Korea” Foreign Affairs 82(2):16-30.

* Marcus Noland (2000) “The Nuclear Confrontation” in Avoiding the Apocalypse: The Future of the Two Koreas (Washington, DC: Institute for International Economics) pp.143-170.

* Ashton B. Carter and William J. Perry (1999) "Standing at the Brink in North Korea: The Counter-proliferation Imperative" in Preventive Defense: A New Security Strategy for America (Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press) pp.123-142.

* Robert L. Gallucci (1998) "US Nonproliferation Policy: Lessons Learned from Our Experience with Iraq and North Korea" in Barry R. Schneider and William L. Dowdy, eds., Pulling Back from the Nuclear Brink: Reducing and Countering Nuclear Threats (Portland, OR: Frank Cass) pp.3-15.

* C. Kenneth Quinones (1998) "North Korea: From Containment to Engagement" in Dae-Sook Suh and Chae-Jin Lee, eds., North Korea After Kim Il Sung (Boluder, CO: Lynne Rienner) pp.101-119.

* Victor Gilinsky (1997) Nuclear Blackmail: the 1994 U.S.-Democratic People's Republic of Korea Agreed Framework on North Korea's Nuclear Program (Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace, Stanford University).


Part III. Regional Economic Issues: Theories & Case Studies


(13) Week 7 East Asian Models of Economic Growth: Government vs. Market

*** Cal Clark and Steve Chan (1998) "Market, State, and Society in Asian Development" in Steve Chan, Cal Clark, and Danny Lam, eds., Beyond Developmental State: East Asia's Political Economies Reconsidered (New York: St. Martin's) pp.25-37.

** Robert Gilpin (2001) “The State and Economic Development” in Global Political Economy: Understanding the International Economic Order (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University) pp. 305-340.

* Gary Gereffi (1998) "More Than the Market, More Than the State: Global Commodity Chains and Industrial Upgrading in East Asia" Ibid, pp.38-59.

* Sung Gul Hong (1997) "Theoretical Debates on the East Asian Miracle: An Analytical Review of Literature" in The Political Economy of Industrial Policy in East Asia: the Semiconductor Industry in Taiwan and South Korea (Northampton, MA: E. Elgar) pp.14-42.

* Adam Przeworski and Fernando Limongi (1997) "Modernization: Theories and Facts" in World Politics 49: 155-183.

* Mitchell Bernard and John Ravenhill (1995) "Beyond Product Cycles and Flying Geese: Regionalization, Hierarchy, and Industrialization of East Asia" in World Politics 47: 171-209.

* Stephan Haggard (1990) "The Neoclassical and Dependency Perspective" in Pathways from the Periphery: The Politics of Growth in the Newly Industrializing Countries (Ithaca NY: Cornell University) pp.9-22.


(14) Week 7 Industrial Strategies: Export-orientation vs. Import-substitution

*** Byung-Nak Song (1997) "Foreign Trade and the Incentive System" in The Rise of the Korean Economy (New York: Oxford University Press) pp.82-102.

** Choong Yong Ahan and Joo-Hoon Kim (1997) "The Outward-Looking Trade Policy and the Industrial Development of South Korea" in Dong-Se Cha, Kwang Suk Kim, Dwight H. Perkins, eds., The Korean Economy 1945-1995: Performance and Vision for the 21st Century (Seoul, Korea: Korean Development Institute) pp.339-382.

* Linda Weiss (1998)"Transformative Capacity in Evolution: East Asian Developmental States" in The Myth of the Powerless State (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press) pp. 41-82.

* Robert Castley (1997)"Markets and Trade" in Korea's Economic Miracle: The Crucial Role of Japan (New York: St. Martin's Press) pp.167-192.

* Martha L. Gibson and Michael D. Ward (1992) "Export Orientation: Pathway or Artifact?" International Studies Quarterly 36:331-344.

* Stephan Haggard (1990) "Korea: From Import Substitution to Export-Led Growth"/ "Taiwan: From Import Substitution to Export-Led Growth" in Pathways from the Periphery: The Politics of Growth in the Newly Industrializing Countries (Ithaca NY: Cornell University) pp.51-75/76-99.

* Colin I. Bradford, Jr. (1990) "Policy Interventions and Markets: Development Strategy, Typologies and Policy Options" in Gary Gereffi and Donald L. Wyman, eds., Manufacturing Miracles: Paths of Industrialization in Latin America and East Asia (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University) pp. 32-51.

(15) Week 8 Case Study I: Lessons from South Korea & Taiwan

*** Heather Smith (2000) “Korea’s Industrial Policy Legacy” in Industry Policy in Taiwan and Korea in the 1980s: Winning with the Market (Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar) pp. 92-130.

** Sung Gul Hong (1997) "A Big Step by a Small Giant: Taiwan's Industrial Catch-Up for Semiconductors" in The Political Economy of Industrial Policy in East Asia: the Semiconductor Industry in Taiwan and South Korea (Northampton, MA: E. Elgar) pp.43-74.

* Tzong-shian Yu (1995) The Role of Government in Economic Planning and Development: the Case of the ROC on Taiwan (Taipei, Taiwan: Chung-Hua Institution for Economic Research).

* Sung Moon Pae (1992) "The Korean Model of Economic Development in Korea: Leading Developing Nation - Economy, Democracy and Welfare (Lanham, MD: University Press of America) pp.67-128.

* Tibor Scitovsky (1990) "Economic Development in Taiwan and South Korea, 1965-1981" in Lawrence J. Lau, ed., Models of Development: A Comparative Study of Economic Growth in South Korea and Taiwan (San Francisco, CA: ICS Press) pp.127-141.

* Cal Clark (1989)"The Taiwan Experience and Political Economy Paradigm" in Taiwan's Development: Implications for Contending Political Economy Paradigms (New York: Greenwood Press) pp.219-247.


(16) Week 8 Case Study II: Chinese Reform & Growth Potentials

*** Francis A. Lees (1997) "Emerging Superpower" in China Superpower: Requisites for High Growth (New York: St. Martin's) pp.39-55.

** Robert Taylor (1996) "The Japanese Model of Development and China's Economic Strategy" in Greater China and Japan: Prospects for an Economic Partnership in East Asia (New York: Routledge) pp.22-55.

* Ma Hong (1995) "The Economic Characteristics of China's Primary Stage of Socialism" in Kate Hannan, ed., China - Modernization and the Goal of Prosperity: Government Administration and Economic Policy in the Late1980s (New York: Cambridge University Press) pp.1-11.

* Susumu Yabuki(translated by Stephen M. Harner) (1995) "Chronology: Evolution of the Reform and Liberalization Policy, 1978-1993" in China's New Political Economy: the Giant Awakes (Boulder, CO: Westview) pp.243-261.

* Susan L. Shirk (1993)" The Political Lessons of Economic Reform in China" in The Political Logic of Economic Reform in China (Berkeley, CA: University of California) pp.333-350.

* World Bank (1990) China: Between Plan and Market (Washington, DC: World Bank).


(17) Week 9 Case Study III: Japanese Boom & Bust

*** William H. Overholt (2002) “Japan’s Economy, at War with Itself” Foreign Affairs 81(1):134-147.

** David N. Balaam & Michael Veseth (2001) “Japan and the Developmental State” in Introduction to International Political Economy (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall) pp.272-294.

* William R. Boulton (1998) "Japan's Model of Economic Development: Will it Work in the Future" in Steve Chan, Cal Clark, and Danny Lam, eds., Beyond Developmental State: East Asia's Political Economies Reconsidered (New York: St. Martin's) pp.109-119.

* Peter Hartcher (1998) "The Club" in The Ministry: How Japans Most Powerful Institution Endangers World Markets (Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press) pp.8-30.

* Eamonn Fingleton (1995) "Japan's Invisible Leviathan" Foreign Affairs 74(2):69-85.

* Chalmers Johnson (1995) " Japan, Who Governs?: An Essay on Official Bureaucracy" in Japan, Who Governs?: The Rise of the Developmental State (New York: W. W. Norton) pp.115-140.

* Christopher Wood (1994) "No More Normality" in The End of Japan Inc.: And How the New Japan Will Look (New York: Simon & Schuster) pp.15-30.

* James E. Vestal (1993) "Evidence on the Efficacy of Industrial Policy During the High-Growth Period" in Planning for Change: Industrial Policy and Japanese Economic Development, 1945-1990 (New York: Oxford University Press) pp.81-114.

* William T. Ziemba and Sandra L. Schwartz (1992) "The Growth of the Economy" in Power Japan: How and Why the Japanese Economy Works (Chicago, IL: Probus Publishing) pp.46-58.


(18) Week 9 Case Study IV: Recent Economic & Financial Crisis

*** Paul Krugman (1999) "All Fall Down: Asia's Crash" in The Return of Depression Economics (New York: W. W. Norton) pp.83-101.

** George Soros (1998) "The Global Financial Crisis" in The Crisis of Global Capitalism: Open Society Endangered (New York: BBS / Public Affairs) pp.135-152.

* Morris Goldstein (1998) "Origins of the Crisis" in The Asian Financial Crisis: Causes, Cures, and Systemic Implications (Washington, DC: Institute for International Economics) pp.7-22.

* Brian Bridges (2001) “Korea’s Crisis” in Korea after the Crash: The Politics of Economic Recovery (New York: Routledge) pp. 13-31.

* Tat Yan Kong (2000) “The Twilight of Developmentalism?: Korea in the IMF Era” in The Politics of Economic Reform in South Korea: A Fragile Miracle (New York: Routledge) pp. 209-241.

* Paul Krugman (1994) "The Myth of Asia's Miracle" Foreign Affairs 73(6): 62-78.

* Paul Krugman (1994) "Competitiveness: A Dangerous Obsession" Foreign Affairs 73 (2): 28-45.


(19) Week 10 Presentation I

(20) Week 10 Presentation II



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