Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals




Скачать 142.83 Kb.
НазваниеProfessor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals
страница2/3
Дата31.10.2012
Размер142.83 Kb.
ТипДокументы
1   2   3

Professor Dasgupta’s nuclear physics project combines innovative concepts with the development of new Australian capabilities to understand the quantum interactions of stable and unstable exotic nuclei, underpinning opportunities with next generation accelerators. As well as advancing our fundamental understanding of fusion, the formation of elements in the universe, and applications to materials science, her research will provide a unique perspective on the transition from quantum to classical behaviour - a key challenge in future nanoscale technologies.


In her ambassadorial role as the Georgina Sweet Australian Laureate Fellowship recipient, Professor Dasgupta will increase the profile of Women in Science through outreach activities, and work towards advancing early career researchers as well as facilitate leadership pathways for senior women researchers.

Professor Dasgupta completed her PhD in 1992 at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research in Mumbai, India. She was awarded an ARC Queen Elizabeth II Fellowship in 1998, and in 2006 was awarded the prestigious Pawsey medal by the Australian Academy of Science for outstanding research in Physics in Australia by a scientist under 40 years of age. Professor Dasgupta was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science (AAS) in 2011.


Professor Dasgupta was the 2004 Australian Institute of Physics (AIP) “Women in Physics” lecturer, undertaking a nation-wide lecture tour. She is a committee member of the Women in Physics Group, the Nuclear and Particle Physics Group of the AIP, and the AAS National Committee for Physics. Professor Dasgupta is passionate about supporting young researchers, Australian science teachers, and championing Science amongst school and college students and members of the public.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Mahananda Dasgupta — 0421 693 721 or Mahananda.Dasgupta@anu.edu.au


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR MARIA FORSYTH


New materials for a sustainable energy future


Current Organisation Deakin University

Administering Organisation Deakin University

Primary research field Materials Engineering

National Research Priority An Environmentally Sustainable Australia


Professor Maria Forsyth is a Professor at the Institute for Technology Research and Innovation and Chair of Electromaterials and Corrosion Sciences at Deakin University. She is Associate Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science. Her research interests include developing an understanding of charge transport at metal/electrolyte interfaces and within electrolyte materials including ionic liquids, polymer electrolytes and plastic crystals.


Professor Forsyth and her team have been at the forefront of developing and characterising new environmentally friendly methods to control charge transfer at reactive metal interfaces to improve corrosion resistance.


The aim of Professor Forsyth’s project is to research and develop new selective transport materials that will underpin the successful development of new sustainable energy technologies (for example in energy storage, desalination and CO2 capture) and allow the greater use of renewable energy sources such as solar, wind and wave energy.


Professor Forsyth completed her PhD in the field of Materials Science/Physical Chemistry at Monash University in 1990. Professor Forsyth has held research appointments at Monash University, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation and the Defence Science and Technology Organisation. Professor Forsyth has published articles in Nature, Science, Journal of Physical Chemistry, Nature Materials and Corrosion Science.


Professor Forsyth has received numerous fellowships including a Fulbright Fellowship at Northwestern University, an ARC Australian Professorial Fellowship, and a Professorial Fellowship within the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science. Professor Forsyth has served on the Board of Governors of the International Society for Solid State Ionics as one of its Councillors (2008-2010), and on the Editorial Board of the journal Solid State Ionics and is a regular member to the scientific advisory boards for international conferences in this field.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Maria Forsyth —03 9244 6818 or mforsyth@deakin.edu.au


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR MARTIN ASPLUND


Unravelling the history of the Milky Way Galaxy and searching for exoplanets through the chemical compositions of stars


Current Organisation Max Planck Institute forAstrophysics

Administering Organisation The Australian National University

Primary research field Astronomical and Space Sciences

National Research Priority Frontier Technologies for Building

and Transforming Australian Industries


Professor Martin Asplund is a Director at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics. He also has an appointment at The Australian National University from which he is on leave whilst at the institute. He is an international leading authority in stellar astrophysics and Galactic astronomy, in particular in stellar atmospheres, radiative transfer and the study of stars to probe stellar structure and evolution, origin of the elements, and formation and evolution of the Milky Way.


Professor Asplund’s project aims to unravel the history of the Milky Way Galaxy and discover how planets form around stars through a combination of sophisticated supercomputer simulations of stars and unprecedented observations with world-leading Australian facilities. He will make extensive use of two innovative Australian observational facilities—the $10M HERMES spectrograph and the $13M Skymapper telescope—and the largest telescopes in the world to search for the first stars born after the Big Bang, decipher the history of the Milky Way, locate the solar siblings and test cosmological models. His pioneering research will also enable the identification of stars likely to harbour planets through the unique information imprinted in the chemical compositions of stars.


Professor Asplund completed his PhD in theoretical astrophysics from Uppsala University, Sweden in 1997. He has held positions at the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics in Copenhagen and Uppsala University. In 2002 he joined the faculty of the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics at The Australian National University where he was promoted to Professor. In 2007 he was head-hunted for the directorship of MPA as one of the youngest ever directors within the prestigious Max Planck Society in Germany.


Professor Asplund’s work on determining the chemical composition of the Sun has completely redefined this astronomical yardstick, which has implications for many fields of astronomy. He has published extensively in leading journals such as Annual Reviews of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Astrophysical Journal, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Nature and Science. He is frequently asked to deliver keynote and invited presentations at international conferences around the world and is actively engaged in disseminating the fascination of astronomy to the general public.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Martin Asplund — 02 6125 0223 (Australia) or +49 89 30000 2208 (Germany)


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR MICHAEL KEANE


Understanding the implications of population ageing for the future costs of funding health care, aged care and aged pensions in Australia 


Current Organisation The University of New South Wales

Administering Organisation The University of New South Wales

Primary research field Applied Economics

National Research Priority Promoting and Maintaining Good Health


Professor Michael Keane is an Australian Research Council (ARC) Federation Fellow and Professor of Economics at The University of New South Wales. He is also an Honorary Associate of the School of Business at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS). Professor Keane’s research interests include labour economics, empirical microeconomics, econometrics, consumer choice behaviour and marketing. He is a world leader in choice modelling, the statistical technique that involves developing mathematical models to predict how individuals or companies make different types of decisions.


Decisions about health insurance, aged care, superannuation and retirement are often very complex, and most people find making the best choices extremely challenging. Professor Keane’s project aims to develop new models and design new policies that can help people make better decisions in these areas, leading to greater wellbeing in retirement.


Professor Keane received his PhD in Economics from Brown University in 1990. He has held positions at several Universities in the United States including the University of Minnesota, New York University, Yale University and a Visiting Research Professorship at Arizona State University. From 2006 to 2010 he was the Co-Director of the Centre for the Study of Choice at the University of Technology, Sydney.


Professor Keane has also been the recipient of the Kenneth J. Arrow Award for Best Paper in Health Economics in 2009 and the John Little Award for the best paper in marketing in 1996. In 2005 he was elected as a Fellow of the Econometric Society and in 2009 he was elected to the Council of the Econometric Society. Professor Keane has also been an Alfred P. Sloan Doctoral Dissertation Fellow. He has served as associate editor of journals such as Econometrica, Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, and the Journal of Econometrics.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Michael Keane — 02 9904 2935 or 02 9385 3670


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR PETER BARTLETT


Large-scale statistical machine learning


Current Organisation Queensland University of Technology

Administering Organisation Queensland University of Technology

Primary research field Statistics

National Research Priority Frontier Technologies for Building and

Transforming Australian Industries


Professor Peter Bartlett is a Research Capacity Building Professor in the Faculty of Science and Technology at Queensland University of Technology. His research interests include machine learning, statistical learning theory, prediction and pattern recognition and adaptive control. Professor Bartlett is internationally recognised for his cutting-edge research bridging computer science and statistics. The research is leading to significant discoveries in the area of machine learning.


Professor Bartlett’s project aims to develop the science behind statistical decision problems, as varied as web retrieval, genomic data analysis, and financial portfolio optimisation. Advances will have a practical impact in the many areas of science and technology that need to make sense of large, complex data streams. 


Professor Bartlett received his PhD from The University of Queensland in 1992. He has held appointments in the Research School of Information Sciences and Engineering at The Australian National University's Institute for Advanced Studies and as a Professor in the Division of Computer Science and the Department of Statistics at the University of California, Berkeley. He has held several honorary and visiting positions including Visiting Research Professor at the Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science at the University of California at Berkeley, Professeur Invite at the Universite Paris-Sud and an Honorary Professor at the University of Queensland.


Professor Bartlett has received several honours and awards including the Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year (2001) for his work in statistical learning theory, lifetime membership and Mediallion Lectureship of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. He has had several editorial roles in journals including Machine Learning, Mathematics of Control Signals and Systems, Journal of Machine Learning Research, Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research, and Foundations and Trends in Machine Learning.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Peter Bartlett — 0488 990 690


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR PETER HALL


New directions, new problems and new data types in statistical science


Current Organisation The University of Melbourne

Administering Organisation The University of Melbourne

Primary research field Statistics

National Research Priority Promoting and Maintaining Good Health


Professor Peter Hall is an Australian Research Council Federation Fellow and Professor of Statistics in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at The University of Melbourne. Professor Hall is recognised as making a significant contribution to the field of statistics through his work on nonparametric modelling, probability theory, Bootstrap expansion, Edgeworth expansion, wavelets, ill-posed inverse problems, fractals-based methods and high-dimensional statistical learning.


Professor Hall’s research will be based around developing methodology for analysing complex, high dimensional data, with motivations that include elucidating the causes of diseases and providing better security for the community. His research will take statistical science in new directions as he develops new methods to tackle these difficult problems.


Professor Hall completed his DPhil in the field of Probability Theory at the University of Oxford in 1976. He is currently an elected fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, the Royal Society of London, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the American Statistical Association and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics.


Professor Hall’s contribution to Statistics has been recognised by receiving the George Szekeres Medal in 2010, which is awarded by the Australian Mathematical Society for his outstanding contribution to mathematical sciences. He has also received honorary doctorates from the Universite Catholique de Louvain, the University of Glasgow and the University of Sydney.


Professor Hall has undertaken numerous leadership roles including serving as Vice-President of the Australian Academy of Science, President of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, Chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute, as a member of the International Advisory Committee for the Department of Business Statistics and Econometrics at Peking University, as President of the Australian Mathematical Society, as Secretary, Physical Sciences, and on the Advisory Board of the Institute for Applied Mathematics and Computational Science at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology.

1   2   3

Похожие:

Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals iconFor the impacts of marine debris on vertebrate marine life

Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals iconThe Southern and Eastern Mediterranean Sea and the Black Sea: New challenges for marine biodiversity research and monitoring’

Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals iconAnimals make us human : creating the best life for animals / Temple Grandin and Catherine

Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals iconThis bibliography is intended as an aid for those studying marine lithologic substrates and the organisms that inhabit them. Although many references to recent

Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals iconII. Catalogue Description The course of human life, including the factors which impinge on the developmental continuum between normal and pathological conditions. III. Course Description

Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals iconMarine Systems

Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals iconApply basic biological concepts to understand the causes and treatments of genetic disorders, diseases and cancer

Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals iconOrigins of life* in the jJniverse

Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals iconNew research findings show that all diseases have simple explanations and cures once their true cause is known. This book describes the causes of both common

Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals iconAn Introduction to Marine Biogeochemistry, 2

Разместите кнопку на своём сайте:
Библиотека


База данных защищена авторским правом ©lib.znate.ru 2014
обратиться к администрации
Библиотека
Главная страница