Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals




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НазваниеProfessor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals
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PROFESSOR BERNARD DEGNAN


Origin, evolution and roles of cardinal genomic features underpinning animal multicellular complexity


Current Organisation The University of Queensland

Administering Organisation The University of Queensland

Primary research field Genetics

National Research Priority Frontier Technologies for Building and Transforming Australian Industries


Professor Bernard Degnan is an Australian Research Council Professorial Fellow at the School of Biological Sciences and is the Director of the Centre for Marine Science at the University of Queensland. His research interests include the genomic, molecular and cellular mechanisms that underpin the formation, evolution and functioning of animals.


Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals.


Professor Degnan obtained his PhD in molecular biology in 1991 from The University of Queensland. Prior to his appointment at The University of Queensland, Professor Degnan received a National Institute of Health Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Marine Biotechnology Center at the University of California, Santa Barbara.


Professor Degnan has published articles in Nature, Science, Current Biology, and PLoS Biology and is on the editorial board of Evolution & Development, Invertebrate Biology and EvoDevo. Professor Degnan’s research has also featured in Sir David Attenborough’s series on the origin of life. He is also a member of the Faculty of 1000 and has been on the boards of the Australian Marine Science Association and the Coral Reef Society.

Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Bernard Degnan— 07 3365 2467


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR CRAIG MORITZ


New approaches to discovering biodiversity and understanding its response to past climate change


Current Organisation University of California, Berkeley, USA

Administering Organisation The Australian National University

Primary research field Evolutionary Biology

National Research Priority An Environmentally Sustainable Australia


Professor Craig Moritz currently holds joint positions as the Director of the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology and Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, USA. His research interests include evolutionary biology, molecular ecology, biogeography, speciation processes, conservation of species, origin and evolution of asexual lizards and comparative phylogeography to understand how species and communities responded to past climate change.


Professor Moritz’s project aims to use new technologies to predict and discover biodiversity hotspots in Australia, especially in the monsoonal tropics. It will build capacity in biodiversity science, and the results will be used to improve conservation policy and the effectiveness of conservation planning.


Professor Moritz graduated with a PhD in evolutionary biology from The Australian National University in 1985. He has held appointments at the University of Michigan and University of Queensland where he became Director of the Center for Conservation Biology and later the Head of the Department of Zoology and School of Life Sciences before he moved to the University of California.


Professor Moritz is currently a trustee and board member of the California Academy of Sciences and a member of the Visiting (Advisory) Committee of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. He has served as the President of the Society for the Study of Evolution and been on discipline panels for the National Science Foundation. He has also served on the editorial boards of Conservation Biology, Molecular Biology and Evolution, Molecular Ecology, Systematic Biology, Trends in Ecology and Evolution, PLoS Biology and the Australian Journal of Zoology. His honours include being awarded the Western US Evolutionary Biologist of the Year.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Craig Moritz — 04 3327 0795 (M) or 02 6227 5427 (H)


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR DAVID STUDDERT


Law for the public's health: lifting the impact of medico-legal institutions on public health


Current Organisation The University of Melbourne

Administering Organisation The University of Melbourne

Primary research field Public Health and Health Services

National Research Priority Promoting and Maintaining Good Health


Professor David Studdert is a Professor and Australian Research Council Federation Fellow at the The University of Melbourne. He has joint appointments at the Melbourne Law School and Melbourne School of Population Health, where he is the Deputy Head of School. His research focuses on public policy issues that cross the legal and health care systems.


Professor Studdert’s project aims to transform the role medico-legal institutions, such as health complaints commissions and coroners, play in advancing population health. Through a series of research partnerships with these institutions, the project will strive to design reforms that improve the quality of health services, reduce costs, and enhance the ability of medico-legal institutions to meet the needs of families who turn to them for help.


Professor Studdert received his law degree from the University of Melbourne in 1992 and his PhD from the Harvard School of Public Health in 1998. He has previously held positions as a Policy Analyst at the RAND Corporation in Los Angeles (1998-2000) and as an Assistant and Associate Professor at Harvard School of Public Health (2000-07).


Professor Studdert has published more than 140 journal articles and book chapters. His work has been influential in national debates over tort reform and health policy in many countries. In 2004, Professor Studdert received the Alice S. Hersh New Investigator Award from AcademyHealth, the world’s leading peak-body for researchers and practitioners in the fields of health policy and health services research.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor David Studdert — 0407 083 444 or d.studdert@unimelb.edu.au


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR GORDON WALLACE


New dimensions in organic bionics


Current Organisation University of Wollongong

Administering Organisation University of Wollongong

Primary research field Macromolecular and Materials

Chemistry

National Research Priority Promoting and Maintaining Good Health


Professor Gordon Wallace is the Director of the Intelligent Polymer Research Institute (IPRI) and Australian Research Council Federation Fellow at the University of Wollongong. He is also Executive Research Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) and Director of the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF) Materials Node in Wollongong. His current research interests include organic conducting polymers, nanomaterials and nanobionics.


Professor Wallace’s project aims to provide a platform to revolutionise medical treatments such as nerve and muscle regeneration which will impact on neural prosthetics. The advent of the next generation of medical bionic devices is critically dependent on advances in multifunctional organic materials that, like living systems, provide spatial and temporal control. Professor Wallace will use the knowledge accrued in developing these bionic devices to progress collaborative projects (with St Vincent’s Hospital in Melbourne) to produce materials for detection and control of epileptic seizures and bone regeneration.


Professor Wallace completed his PhD at Deakin University in 1983. He was also awarded a DSc from Deakin University in 2000. Professor Wallace lectured at University College in Cork before returning to Australia in 1985 to take up an appointment at the University of Wollongong. In 1990, Professor Wallace established the world’s first intelligent polymer research laboratory.


Professor Wallace is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering and Institute of Physics (UK). He has received numerous awards including the Inaugural Polymer Science and Technology award from the Royal Australian Chemical Institute (RACI), the 2009 NSW Scientist of the Year Award (Chemistry), a Science Foundation Ireland Walton Fellowship, RACI HG Smith Medal and RACI Stokes Medal for research in Electrochemistry.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Gordon Wallace — 02 4221 3127 or 0448 729436


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR IAN PETERSEN


Consensus, estimation and control in complex large-scale quantum systems


Current Organisation The University of New South Wales

Administering Organisation The University of New South Wales

Primary research field Applied Mathematics

National Research Priority Frontier Technologies for Building and Transforming Australian Industries


Professor Ian Petersen is an Australian Research Council Federation Fellow and Professor at the School of Engineering and Information Technology at The University of New South Wales (UNSW) at Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA), ACT. His most significant contributions have been made in the field of Systems and Control Theory, and in particular within the areas of Robust Control Theory, Stochastic Control Theory and Quantum Control Theory.


Australia has considerable strengths in quantum technology research and as these technologies advance, the issue of control becomes a critical one. Professor Petersen’s project aims to strengthen Australia's position in quantum technology by developing new methodologies for designing high performance feedback control systems for emerging complex quantum applications.


Professor Petersen was awarded his PhD in Electrical Engineering at the University of Rochester, USA in 1984. He has held several appointments including a Postdoctoral Fellowship at The Australian National University before joining UNSW in 1985. Professor Petersen has also had a Visiting Fellowship at the Department of Engineering at Cambridge University, and has served as the Australian Research Council Executive Director for Mathematics, Information and Communications for the years 2002 to 2004 whilst on secondment from UNSW. He was also Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research at UNSW from August 2004 until March 2005.


Professor Petersen is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), the Institution of Engineers Australia (I.E. Aust) and a member of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. He has served as an Associate Editor for journals such as IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, Systems and Control Letters, Automatica and SIAM Journal on Control and Optimization. He is currently the Corresponding Editor for the journal Automatica in the area of Control and Estimation Theory. Professor Petersen has also been the recipient of a Fulbright Scholarship.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Ian Petersen — 02 6268 8446


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR JASON MATTINGLEY


Cognitive control of attention and its role in regulating brain function
in health and disease



Current Organisation The University of Queensland

Administering Organisation The University of Queensland

Primary research field Psychology

National Research Priority Promoting and Maintaining Good Health


Professor Jason Mattingley is the Foundation Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience at The University of Queensland, where he holds a joint appointment between the Queensland Brain Institute and the School of Psychology. Professor Mattingley’s research focus is to understand the brain processes that filter and prioritise sensory inputs, cognitive operations and motor outputs, known collectively as selective attention.


Professor Mattingley’s project will investigate how people use attention to filter sensory information and how the brain controls attention in health and disease. The findings will support new initiatives in a range of fields, from the development of more effective teaching practices, to improved rehabilitation strategies for people with brain injuries.


Professor Mattingley was awarded his PhD from Monash University in 1995. Before moving to The University of Queensland, Professor Mattingley was Director of the Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory within the School of Behavioural Science at The University of Melbourne. He has also held appointments as a Senior Research Fellow at Monash University and a National Health and Medical Research Council Neil Hamilton Fairley Post-Doctoral Fellow at the University of Cambridge, UK from 1994 to 1997. During his period in Cambridge, Professor Mattingley was a Fellow of King’s College.


Professor Mattingley is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia, and a member of the Australian Academy of Science’s National Committee for Brain and Mind. He has previously been a member of the NHMRC Neurology and Brain Imaging Grant Review Panel in 2008, and Chair of the NHMRC Psychiatric Brain Imaging Grant Review Panel in 2009. Professor Mattingley serves as an editorial board member for several international journals, including Brain and Cognition, Cortex, Cognitive Neuroscience, Neurocase, and Neuropsychologia.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Jason Mattingley — 07 3346 6331


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR MAHANANDA DASGUPTA

Recipient of 2011 Georgina Sweet Australian Laureate Fellowship


Frontiers of reaction dynamics for new generation accelerator science



Current Organisation The Australian National University

Administering Organisation The Australian National University

Primary research field Nuclear Physics

National Research Priority Frontier Technologies for Building

and Transforming Australian Industries


Professor Mahananda (Nanda) Dasgupta is an experimental physicist at the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility in the Department of Nuclear Physics of the Australian National University (ANU). She is an international leader in accelerator-based nuclear fusion and fission. Her research has resulted in a fundamental change in the current understanding of these processes. She is the recipient of the inaugural 2011 Georgina Sweet Australian Laureate Fellowship in recognition of her role in science and technology, particularly nuclear science. This provides additional funding for mentoring and recognition of excellence for women in these disciplines.

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