Midterm (March 20) (30%), Term Paper (April 9) (30%) and Final (May 8) (40%). Paper (12 pages maximum) – on major current policy issue facing one of the countries studied. Please submit to ta by email and note class title and number. Readings




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Harvard Extension School

Spring 2012


Comparative National Security of Middle Eastern Countries

GOVT E-1961


Professor Chuck Freilich


At the crossroads of three continents, the Middle East is home to many diverse peoples, with ancient and proud cultures, in varying stages of political and socio-economic development, often times in conflict. Now in a state of historic flux, the Arab Spring has transformed the Middle Eastern landscape, with great consequence for the national security strategies of the countries of the region and their foreign relations. The primary source of the world's energy resources, the Middle East remains the locus of the terror-WMD-fundamentalist nexus, which continues to pose a significant threat to both regional and international security.


The course surveys the national security challenges facing the region's primary players (Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Syria and Lebanon, Israel, the Palestinians and Turkey, Jordan) and how the revolutions of the past year will affect them. Unlike many Middle East courses, which focus on US policy in the region, the seminar concentrates on the regional players' perceptions of the threats and opportunities they face and on the strategies they have adopted to deal with them. It thus provides an essential vantage point for all those interested in gaining a deeper understanding of a region, which stands at the center of many of the foreign policy issues of our era. The course is designed for those with a general interest in the Middle East, especially those interested in national security issues, students of comparative politics and practitioners/future practitioners, with an interest in "real world" international relations and national security. 


Requirements


Class Participation - (compulsory attendance) on materials assigned. In order to facilitate discussion, please read assigned materials in advance of each class and come prepared to discuss them.


Undergrads - Midterm (March 20) (40%) and Final (May 8) (60%).

Grads - Midterm (March 20) (30%), Term Paper (April 9) (30%) and Final (May 8) (40%). Paper (12 pages maximum) – on major current policy issue facing one of the countries studied. Please submit to TA by email and note class title and number.


Readings - All required book readings are on reserve. Journal articles and think tank studies (e.g. Brookings, Washington Institute for Near East Policy) and various government related institutions (e.g. Congressional Research Service, Army War College) are available on-line, and book chapters are available on the course site.


Office Hours:

Tuesdays 10-12 (no need to schedule) and Wednesdays (by appointment), One Brattle Square, room 505, 5th floor. Also usually available in classroom immediately before class (please schedule).


Contact info:


Chuck_Freilich@Harvard.edu

(c) 917 575 0273


TA: Annie Tracy Samuel

annietracysamuel@gmail.com

(c) 339-203-3736

Office: One Brattle Square, 5th floor, room 507

Office Hours: Thursdays 3:00-5:00 or by appointment


Course Structure and Readings


Week 1, January 24: The Middle East Today – Overview

  1. Foreign Affairs, Vol. 90 No. 3, May/June 2011. Articles by: Goldstone pp. 8-16; Doran pp. 17-25; Shehata (Egypt) pp. 26-32.

  2. Pollack, K., et al. The Arab Awakening: America and the Transformation of the Middle East, Brookings, Washington, 2011: Chapter 18, Reidel (Saudi Arabia); Chapter 29, Maloney (Iran); Chapter 30, Taspinar (Turkey).

  3. Unchartered Waters: Thinking Through Syria’s Dynamics, International Crisis Group, Middle East Briefing No. 31, November 24, 2011.



Week 2, January 31: Egypt – The Center of the Realm?

Required

  1. Alterman, J.B., “Dynamics Without Drama: New Options and Old Compromises in Egypt’s Foreign Policy,” Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Volume 18, Number 3, October 2005.

  2. Fandy, M., “Egypt: Could It Lead the Arab World?” in Judith Yaphe, ed., The Middle East in 2015: The Implications of Regional Trends on U.S. Strategic Planning, Washington, DC: NDU, 2002, pp. 59-73.

  3. Hinnebusch, R., “The Foreign Policy Of Egypt,” in Hinnebusch, R. and Ehteshami, A., The Foreign Policies of Middle East States, Lynne Rienner, Boulder, 2002, pp. 91-112.

  4. Kadry Said, M., Egypt's Foreign policy in Global Change: The Egyptian Role in Regional and International Politics, Al Ahram Center for Political and Strategic Studies, December 5, 2006.

  5. Kadry Said, M., The Inside and the Outside: Egyptian Security Policy in a New Environment, Al Ahram Center for Political and Strategic Studies, 2004.

  6. Monem Said Aly, Abdel, An Ambivalent Alliance: The Future of US-Egyptian Relations, Saban Center, Brookings, Analysis Paper 6, January 2006, pp. 5-19.


Recommended

  • Abadi, J., “Egypt's Policy Towards Israel: The Impact of Foreign and Domestic Constraints,” Israel Affairs, Winter 2006, Vol. 12 No. 1, pp. 159-174.

  • Bahgat, G. “The Proliferation of WMD: Egypt,” Arab Studies Quarterly, Spring 2007, Vol. 29 No. 2.

  • Bowker, R., “Egypt and the Politics of Change in the Arab Middle East,” Chelltenham, North Hampton, 2010.

  • Cassandra (pseudo.), “The Impending Crisis in Egypt,” Middle East Journal, Vol. 49, No. 1, Winter 1995, pp. 9-27.

  • Cook, S.A., “Egypt – Still America's Partner?,” Middle East Quarterly, June 2000, Vol. 7 No. 2.

  • Dowek, E., Israeli-Egyptian Relations, 1980-2000, Frank Cass, Portland, 2001.

  • Dumke, D.T., “Congress and the Arab Heavyweights: Questioning the Saudi and Egyptian Alliances,” Middle East Policy, Sept. 2006, Vol. 13 No. 3, pp. 88-100.

  • Einhorn, R., “Egypt: Frustrated but Still on a Non-Nuclear Course,” in Kurt Campbell, Einhorn, R., Reiss. M., (eds.) The Nuclear Tipping Point: Why States Reconsider Their Nuclear Choices, Washington, D.C., Brookings, 2004, pp. 43-82.

  • Emad, G., “Egyptian-European Relations: From Conflict to Cooperation,” Review of International Affairs, Winter 2003, Vol. 3 No. 2, pp. 173-189.

  • Frisch, H., “Guns and Butter in the Egyptian Army,” in Rubin, B. and Keaney, T.A., eds., Armed Forces in the Middle East: Politics and Strategy, Frank Cass, London, 2002.

  • Gerges, F.A., “Egyptian–Israeli Relations Turn Sour,” Foreign Affairs, May/June 1995, Vol. 74 No. 3, pp. 69-78.

  • Hanna, M.W., “The Son Also Rises: Egypt’s Looming Succession Struggle,” World Policy Journal, Fall 2009, pp. 103-114.

  • Harb, I., The Egyptian Military in Politics, Middle East Journal, Spring 2003, Vol. 47, No. 2, p. 269.

  • Helfont, T, “Egypt's Wall with Gaza and the Emergence of a New Middle East Alignment,” Orbis, Summer 2010, pp. 426-439.

  • Karawan, I., “Foreign Policy Restructuring: Egypt's Disengagement From the Arab-Israeli Conflict Revisited,” Cambridge Review of International Affairs, October 2005, Vol. 18 No. 3, pp. 325-338.

  • Monem Said Aly, Abdel, “From Geopolitics to Geo-Economics: Egyptian National Security Perceptions,” in UNIDIR, National Threat Perceptions in the Middle East, N.Y., 1995.

  • Moneim Said Aly, Abdel, et al, “US-Egyptian Relations,” Middle East Policy, June 2001, Vol. 8 No. 2, p. 45.

  • Rubin, B., ed., The Muslim Brotherhood: The Organization and Policies of the Global Islamic Movement, NY, Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

  • Spector, S.J., “Washington and Cairo – Near the Breaking Point?,” Middle East Quarterly, Summer 2005, Vol. 12 No. 3, pp 1-11.

  • Sullivan, D.J. and Jones, K., Global Security Watch – Egypt: A Reference Handbook, Westport, Praeger, 2008.

  • “US and Egypt – How Allied: A Debate,” Middle East Quarterly, December 2000, Vol. 7 No. 4, p.51.



Week 3, February 7: Saudi Arabia – The Keeper of Islam

Required

  1. Cordesman, A., Saudi Arabia Enters the Twenty First Century: The Political, Foreign Policy, Economic and Energy Dimensions, Praeger, Westport, 2003, pp. 1-37; 41-122.

  2. Peterson, J., Saudi Arabia and the Illusion of Security, Adelphi Paper 348, IISS, Oxford, London, 2002, pp. 5-57.


Recommended

  • Aarts, P. and Nonneman, G. eds., Saudi Arabia in The Balance: Political Economy, Society and Foreign Affairs, NYU Press, NY 2006.

  • Al-Rasheed, M, A History of Saudi Arabia, Cambridge Press, Cambridge, 2002.

  • Al-Rasheed, M., ed., Kingdom without Borders: Saudi Political Religious and Media Frontiers, London, Hurst, 2008.

  • Ayoob, M., and Kosebalaban eds., Religion and Politics in Saudi Arabia: Wahhabism and the State, Boulder, Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2009.

  • Bahgat, G., “Nuclear Proliferation: The Case of Saudi Arabia,” Middle East Journal, Vol. 60 No. 3, Summer 2006, pp. 421-443.

  • Bahgat, G., “Saudi Arabia and the Arab-Israeli Peace Process,” Middle East Policy, Vol. 14 No. 3, Fall 2007, pp. 49-59.

  • Bronson, R., Thicker Than Oil: America’s Uneasy Partnership With Saudi Arabia, Oxford Press, Oxford, 2006.

  • Champion, D., The Paradoxical Kingdom, Columbia, NY, 2003.

  • Cordesman, A. and Obaid, N., Al-Qaeda in Saudi Arabia: Asymmetric Threats and Islamic Extremists, CSIS, Washington, January 2005.

  • Cordesman, A. and Obaid. N., National Security in Saudi Arabia: Threats, Responses and Challenges, Praeger, Westport, 2005.

  • Cordsman, A., Saudi Arabia Enters the Twenty First Century: The Military and International Dimensions, Praeger, Westport, 2003.

  • Dumke, D.T., “Congress and the Arab Heavyweights: Questioning the Saudi and Egyptian Alliances,” Middle East Policy, Vol. 13 No. 3, Fall 2006, pp 88-100.

  • Gause, F.G., “The Foreign Policy of Saudi Arabia,” in Hinnebusch, R. and Anoushiravan, E., The Foreign Policies of Middle East States, Lynne Rienner, Boulder, 2002.

  • Gause. G., “Saudi Arabia Challenged,” Current History, Vol. 103 No. 669, January 2004, pp. 21-24.

  • Jones, T. C., Desert Kingdom: How Oil and Water Forged Modern Saudi Arabia, Cambridge, Harvard, 2010.

  • Jones, T. C., “The Iraq Effect in Saudi Arabia,” Middle East Report, Vol. 45 No. 19 September 2005.

  • Kechichian, L., “Saudi's Will,” Middle East Policy, Vol. 10 No. 4, February 2003, pp. 47-59, www.mepc.org/public_asp/journal_vol10/0312_kechichian.asp.

  • Lahn, H. and Stevens, P., Burning Oil to Keep Cool: The Hidden Energy Crisis in Saudi Arabia, Chatam House, Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2011.

  • Nasr, V., “Regional Implications of Shia Revival in Iraq,” Washington Quarterly, Vol. 27, 2004.

  • Niblock, T., Saudi Arabia: Power, Legitimacy and Survival, Routledge, NY 2006.

  • Pant, H.V., “Saudi Arabia Woos China and India,” Middle East Quarterly, Vol. 13 No. 4, Fall 2006, pp. 45-52.

  • Peterson, J., Saudi Arabia and the Illusion of Security, Adelphi Paper 348, IISS, Oxford, London, 2002, pp. 5-57.

  • Podeh, E., From Fahd to Abdullah: The Origins of Saudi Peace Initiatives and Their Impact on the Arab System and Israel, Truman Institute, Hebrew University, 2003.

  • Posner, G.L., Secrets of the Kingdom: The Inside Story of the Saudi-US Connection, Random House, NY 2005.

  • Reidel, B. and Saab, B.Y., “Al-Qaeda’s Third Front: Saudi Arabia,” Washington Quarterly, Vol. 31 No. 2, 2008, pp. 33–46.

  • Rubin, B. (ed.). Crises in the Contemporary Persian Gulf, Frank Cass, London, 2002.

  • Russell, J.A., “Saudi Arabia in the 21st Century: A New Security Dilemma,”
    Middle East Policy, Vol. 12 No. 3, Fall 2005, pp. 64-78.

  • Russell, R.L., “A Saudi Nuclear Option?Survival, Vol. 43 No. 2, Summer, 2001.

  • Sunayama, S., Syria and Saudi Arabia: Collaboration and Conflicts in the Oil Era, Tauris, London, 2007.

  • Wrampelmeier, B., “Saudi Arabia in the Balance: Political Economy, Society, Foreign Affairs,” Middle East Policy, Vol. 13 No. 2, Summer 2006, pp. 187-192.

  • Yetiv, S.A., Crude Awakenings: Global Oil Security and American Foreign Policy, Cornell, Ithaca, 2004.



Weeks 4-5, February 14-21: Iran - The New Regional Hegemon?

Required

  1. Chubin, S., Whither Iran: Reform, Domestic Politics and National Security, Oxford, NY, 2002, pp 35-51, 72-107.

  2. Chubin, S., Iran's Nuclear Ambitions, Carnegie Endowment, Washington DC, 2006, pp. 14-36, 53-55, 113-133.

  3. Edelman, E. S. et al, “The Dangers of a Nuclear Iran,” Foreign Affairs, Vol. 90 No. 1, January/February 2011.

  4. Ehteshami, A., “The Foreign Policy of Iran,” in Hinnebusch, R. and Anoushiravan, E., The Foreign Policies of Middle East States, Lynne Rienner, Boulder, 2002, pp. 283-300.

  5. Sherrill, C.W., “After Khamenei: Who Will Succeed Iran’s Supreme Leader?” Orbis, Vol. 55 No. 4, 2011, pp. 631-647.

  6. Takeyh, R., Hidden Iran: Paradox and Power in the Islamic Republic, NY Times Press, New York, 2006, pp. 59-82.


Recommended

  • Albright, D., Peddling Peril: How the Secret Nuclear Trade Arms America’s Enemies, Free Press, New York 2010.

  • Ansari, A.M., Confronting Iran: The Failure of American Foreign Policy and the Next Great Crisis in the Middle East, Basic, NY, 2006.

  • Ansari, A.M., Crisis of Authority: Iran’s 2009 Presidential Election, Brookings, Washington DC, 2010.

  • Bahgat, G., “Strategic Rivalry in the Caspian Sea,” Journal of South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Vol. 29, Summer 2006, pp. 1-17.

  • Barzegar, K., “Iran and the New Iraq,” Turkish Journal of International Relations, Fall 2006, Vol. 5 No. 3, pp. 77-88.

  • Bulliet, R.W., “Iran Between East and West,” Journal of International Affairs, Spring/Summer 2007, Vol. 60 No. 2, pp. 1-14.

  • Carpenter, T. G.,  “Toward a Grand Bargain with Iran,”  Mediterranean Quarterly, Vol. 18, Winter 2007, pp. 12-27.

  • Chubin, S., Iran’s National Security Policy: Intentions, Capabilities and Impact, Carnegie Endowment, Washington, DC, 1994, pp. 3-18.

  • Chubin, S., “Iran’s Strategic Predicament,” Middle East Journal, Winter 2000, Vol. 54 No. 1, pp. 10-24.

  • Chubin, S. and Litwak, R.S., “Debating Iran’s Nuclear Aspirations,” Washington Quarterly, Autumn 2003, Vol. 26 Issue 4, pp. 99-155.

  • Clawson, P., “Could Sanctions Work Against Tehran?”  Middle East Quarterly, Vol. 14 No. 13-20,  Winter 2007.

  • Clawson, P. and Eisenstadt, M. (eds), Deterring the Ayatollahs: Complications in Applying Cold War Strategy to Iran, Washington Institute for Near East Affairs, July 2007.

  • Clawson, P. and Eisenstadt, M., Forcing Hard Choices on Tehran: Raising the Costs of Iran’s Nuclear Program, Washington Institute for Near East Policy, November 2006.

  • Cook, A. H. and Rosh, J., The United States and Iran: Policy Challenges and Opportunities, New York, Palgrave, 2010.

  • Cordesman, A. and Al-Rodhan, K.R., Gulf Military Forces in an Era of Asymmetric Wars, Praeger, Westport, 2007.

  • Cordesman, A., Iran’s Developing Military Capabilities, CSIS, Washington, DC, 2005.

  • Cordesman, A. and Al-Rodhan, K.R., Iran’s Weapons of Mass Destruction, CSIS, Washington, 2006.

  • Council on Foreign Relations, Independent Task Force on U.S. Policy Toward Iran, Iran: Time for a New Approach: Report of an Independent Task Force, NY, 2004.

  • Dobbins, J. et al, Coping With Iran: Confrontation, Containment or Engagement, Rand Corp., Santa Monica, 2007.

  • Ehteshami, A., Iran's International Posture After the Fall of Baghdad, Middle East Journal, spring 2004, v 58 #2, pp. 179-194

  • Eisenstadt, M., “The Armed Forces of the Islamic Republic of Iran,” in Rubin, B. and Keaney, T.A., eds., Armed Forces in the Middle East: Politics and Strategy, Frank Cass, London, 2002.

  • Entessar, N., “Iran’s Security Challenges,” Muslim World, October 2004, Vol. 94 Issue 4, pp. 537-554.

  • Fair, C., “India and Iran: New Delhi’s Balancing Act,” Washington Quarterly, Summer 2007, Vol. 30 No. 3, pp 145-159.

  • Faisal bin Salman as-Saud, Iran, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf - Power Politics In Transition, Tauris, NY, 2003, pp. 1-9.

  • Fitzpatrick, M., “Assessing Iran’s Nuclear Programme,”  Survival, Vol. 48, Autumn 2006, pp. 5-26.  

  • Gasiorowski, M., “The New Aggressiveness In Iran’s Foreign Policy,” Middle East Policy, June 2007, Vol. 14 No. 2, pp. 125-132.

  • Gonzalez, N., Engaging Iran: The Rise of a Middle East Powerhouse and America’s Strategic Choice, Praeger, Westport, 2007.

  • Goodarzi, J.M., Syria and Iran: Diplomatic Alliance, Tauris, London, 2006.

  • Hunter, S., Iran’s Foreign Policy in the Post-Soviet Era: Resisting the New International Order, Santa Barbara, Praeger, 2010.

  • International Military Markets: Middle East and Africa, Vol.1, chapter on Iranian military budget, force structure and military posture, Forecast International/DMS, 2007.

  • Jane’s Sentinel Security Assessment: The Gulf States, Vol. 1, chapter on security, armed forces, doctrine, declared policy, Alexandria VA., Jane’s Information Group, 2007.

  • Katz, M.N., “Iran and America: Is Rapprochement Finally Possible,” Middle East Policy, Winter, 2005, Vol. 12 No. 4, pp. 58-65.

  • Katzman, K., Iran Sanctions, Congressional Research Service, December 2, 2011.

  • Kroenig, M., “Time to Attack Iran,” Foreign Affairs, Vol. 91 No. 1 January/February 2012.

  • Lawson, F., “Syria’s Relations with Iran: Managing the Dilemmas of Alliance,” Middle East Journal, Winter 2007, Vol. 61 Issue 1, pp. 29-47.

  • Leverett, F., US-Iran Relations: Looking Back and Looking Ahead, Emirates Center for Strategic Studies and Research, Abu Dhabi, 2003.

  • Maloney, S., “Iran’s Long Reach: Iran As a Pivotal State in the Muslim World,” US Institute of Peace, Washington DC, 2008.

  • Marschall, C., Iran’s Persian Gulf Policy: From Khomeini to Khatami, Routledge Curzon, NY, 2003.

  • McFaul, Michael, Milani, Abbas, and Diamond, Larry.  “A Win-Win U.S. Strategy for Dealing with Iran,”  Washington Quarterly,  Vol. 30,  Winter 2006-2007, pp. 121-138. 

  • Menashri, D., “Iran’s Regional Policy: Between Radicalism and Pragmatism,” Journal of International Affairs, Spring/Summer 2007, Vol. 60 No. 2, pp. 153-167.

  • Menashri, D., Post-Revolutionary Politics in Iran: Religion, Society and Power, Frank Cass, London, 2001, pp. 182-205, 227-255, 261-297.

  • Milani, M., “Tehran’s Take,” Foreign Affairs, Vol. 88 No. 4, July/August 2009.

  • Murray, D., US Foreign Policy and Iran: American-Iranian Relations since the Islamic Revolution, New York, Routledge, 2010.

  • Ramazani, R.K., “Ideology and Pragmatism in Iran’s Foreign Policy,” Middle East Journal, Autumn 2004, Vol. 58 No. 4, pp. 549-559.

  • Sagan, S. D.,  “How to Keep the Bomb from Iran,”  Foreign Affairs, Vol. 85,  September-October 2006, pp. 45-59.

  • Sariolghalam, M., “Understanding Iran: Getting Past Stereotypes and Mythology,” Washington Quarterly, Autumn 2003, Vol. 26 No. 4, pp. 69-83.

  • Saikal, A., “Iran’s New Strategic Entity,” Australian Journal of International Affairs, September 2007, Vol. 61 No. 3, pp. 296-305.

  • Seyed Hussein Musavi, “Defense Policies of the Islamic Republic of Iran,” Discourse: An Iranian Quarterly, Vol. 2 No. 4, 2001, pp. 43-58.

  • Shai, S., The Axis of Evil : Iran, Hizballah, and Palestinian Terror, Transaction, New Brunswick, 2005.

  • Sokolski, H. and Clawson, P. eds., Getting Ready for a Nuclear Iran, US Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, 2005.

  • Takeyh, R., “Iran Builds the Bomb,” Survival, Winter 2004/2005, Vol. 46 No. 4, pp. 51-64.

  • Takeyh, R., Guardians of the Revolution, Oxford, 2009.

  • Takeyh, R., “Time for Détente with Iran,”  Foreign Affairs, Vol. 86, March/April 2007, pp. 17-32.

  • Vakil, S., “Iran: Balancing East Against West,” Washington Quarterly, Autumn 2006, Vol. 29 No. 4, pp. 51-65.



Week 6, February 28: Turkey- Rising Power, New Directions?

Required

  1. Aydin, M., “Determinants of Turkish Foreign Policy and Turkey’s European Vocation,” Review of International Affairs, Vol. 3 No. 2, Winter 2003, pp. 306-331.

  2. Baran, Z., Torn Country: Turkey Between Secularism and Islam, Hoover, Stanford, 2010, pp. 105-138.

  3. Muftuler-Bac, M., “The European Union’s Accession Negotiations with Turkey from a Foreign Policy Perspective,” European Integration, Vol. 30 No. 1, March 2008, pp. 63-78.

  4. Robins, P., “Turkish Foreign Policy Since 2002: Between a Post Islamist Government and a Kemalist State,” International Affairs, Vol. 83 No. 2, March 2007, pp. 289-304.


Recommended

  • Akcapar, B., Turkey’s New European Era: Foreign Policy on the Road to EU Membership, Rowman and Littlefield, Lanham, 2007.

  • Akturk, U., “Turkish-Russian Relations After the Cold War 1992-2002,” Turkish Studies, Vol. 7 No. 3, Autumn 2006, pp. 337-364.

  • Altunisik, M. B., “From Distant Neighbors to Partners? Changing Syrian-Turkish Relations,” Security Dialogue, Vol. 37 No. 2, June 2006, pp. 229-248.

  • Ankara Papers, “Main Determinants of Turkish Foreign Policy in the Middle East,” Vol. 8 No. 1, 2003, pp. 5-22.

  • Arikan, H., Turkey and the EU: An Awkward Candidate for EU Membership?, Aldershot, Burlington, 2007.

  • Aydin, M., “Determinants of Turkish Foreign Policy: Historical Framework and Traditional Inputs,” Middle Eastern Studies, Vol. 35 No. 4, 1999, pp. 152-178.

  • Aydin, M. and Ifantis, K., eds., Turkish-Greek Relations: The Security Dilemma in the Aegean, Routledge, NY 2004.

  • Aydinli, E., “A Paradigmatic Shift for the Turkish Generals and an End to the Coup Era in Turkey,” Middle East Journal, Vol. 63 No. 4, Autumn 2009, pp. 581-596.

  • Carkoglu, A. and Rubin, B. eds., Greek-Turkish Relations in an Era of Détente, Frank Cass, London, 2005.

  • Cook, S.A., Generating Momentum for a New Era in US-Turkey Relations, Council on Foreign Relations, NY, 2006.

  • Cook, S.A., Ruling but not Governing: The Military and Political development in Egypt, Algeria and Turkey, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, 2007.

  • Desai, S., “Turkey in the European Union: A Security Perspective,” Defense Studies, Vol. 5 No. 3, Autumn, 2005, pp. 366-393.

  • Diez, T., Turkey, the EU and Security Complexes Revisited, Mediterranean Politics, v10 # 2, July 2005, pp. 167-180

  • Eligur, B., The Mobilization of Political Islam in Turkey, Cambridge Press, New York, 2010.

  • Fuller, G. E., The New Turkish Republic: Turkey As a Pivotal State in the Muslim World, US Institute of peace, Washington DC, 2008.

  • Fuller, G.E., “Turkey’s Strategic Model: Myths and Realities,” Washington Quarterly, Vol. 27 No. 3, pp. 51-64.

  • Gerhards, J., Cultural Overstretch? Differences Between Old and New States of the EU and Turkey, Routledge, NY, 2007.

  • Gordon, P. and Taspinar, O., “Turkey on the Brink,” Washington Quarterly, Vol. 29 No. 3, Summer 2006, pp. 57-70.

  • Gurfinkiel, M., “Is Turkey Lost?” Commentary, March 2007, pp. 30-37.

  • Hale, W.M., Turkey, the US and Iraq, Saqi, London, 2007.

  • Isyar, G.O., “An Analysis of Turkish-US Relations From 1945-2004,” Alternatives: Turkish Journal of International Relations, Vol. 4 No. 3, Fall 2005, pp. 21-48.

  • Jenkins, G., “Continuity and Change: Prospects for Civil-Military Relations in Turkey,” International Affairs, Vol. 83 No. 2 March 2007, pp. 339-355.

  • Karaosmanoglu, A., “The Evolution of the National Security Culture and the Military in Turkey,” Journal of International Affairs, Vol. 54 No. 1, 2000, pp. 199-216.

  • Kardas, S., “Turkey: Rejoining the Middle East Map or Building Sand Castles?” Middle East Policy, Vol. 17 No. 1, Spring 2010, pp. 115-136.

  • Kibaroglu, M. and Kib, A., Global Security Watch – Turkey: a Reference Handbook, Westport, Praeger, 2009.

  • Kinacioglu, M. and Oktay, E., “The Domestic Dynamics of Turkey’s Cyprus Policy,” Turkish Studies, Vol. 7 No. 2, June 2006, pp. 261-273.

  • Lago, E. and Jorgenson, K.E. eds., Turkey and the EU: Prospects for a Difficult Encounter, Basingstroke, Palgrave, 2007.

  • Larabee, F.S., “Turkey Rediscovers the Middle East,” Foreign Affairs, Vol. 86 No. 4, July/August 2007, pp. 103-114.

  • Lewis, J.E., “Replace Turkey as a Strategic Partner?” Middle East Quarterly, Spring 2006, pp. 45-52 .

  • Martin, L.G. and Keridis, D., eds., The Future of Turkish Foreign Policy, MIT Press, Cambridge, 2004, chapters on: US (83-126), Middle East, (157-189), Caspian and Energy (211-239)

  • Morris, C., The New Turkey: The Quiet Revolution on the Edge of Europe, Granta, London, 2005.

  • Muftuler-Bac, M., “The European Union’s Accession Negotiations with Turkey from a Foreign Policy Perspective,” European Integration, Vol. 30 No. 1, March 2008, pp. 63-78.

  • Murinson, A., “The Strategic Depth Doctrine in Turkish Foreign Policy,” Middle Eastern Studies, Vol. 42 No. 6, November 2006, pp. 945-964.

  • Nursin Atesoglu Güney, ed., Contentious Issues of Security and the Future of Turkey, Aldershots, Burlington, 2007.

  • Onis, Z., “The Turkey-EU-US Triangle in Perspective: Transformation or Continuity,” Middle East Journal, Vol. 59 No. 2, Spring 2005, pp. 265-284.

  • Redmond, J., “Turkey and the European Union,” International Affairs, Vol. 83 No. 2, March 2007, pp. 305-317.

  • Rubin, B.M. and Carkoglu, A. eds., Religion and Politics in Turkey, Routledge, London 2006.

  • Somer, M. and Liaras, E.G., “Turkey’s New Kurdish Opening: Religious Versus Secular Values,” Middle East Policy, Vol. 17 No. 2, Summer 2010, pp. 152-165.

  • Yanik, L.K., “Allies or Partners? An Appraisal of Turkey’s Ties to Russia, 1991-2007,” East European Quarterly, Vol. 41 No. 3, September 2009, pp. 349-370.

  • Walker, J., “Turkey and Israel’s Relationship in the Middle East,” Mediterranean Quarterly, Vol. 17 No. 4, Fall 2006, pp. 60-90.

  • Yanik, L.K., “Allies or Partners? An Appraisal of Turkey’s Ties to Russia, 1991-2007,” East European Quarterly, Vol. 41 No. 3, Fall 2007, pp. 349-370.



Week 7, March 6: Israel (part one) – A Nation Dwelling Alone?

Required

  1. Brom, S., From Rejection to Acceptance, Special Report 177, US Institute of Peace, Washington, DC, February 2007.

  2. Feldman, S., “Israel’s National Security: Perceptions and Policy,” in Feldman, S. and Toukan, A., Bridging the Gap: A Future Security Architecture for the Middle East, Carnegie, N.Y., 1997, pp. 7-31.

  3. Freilich, C.D. “National Security Decision Making in Israel: Processes, Strengths and Pathologies,” Middle East Journal, Vol. 60 No. 4, Autumn 2006, pp. 635-663.

  4. Freilich, C.D., “Speaking About the Unspeakable: The US-Israeli Dialogue Regarding Iran’s Nuclear Program,” Washington Institute for Near East Policy, December 2007.

  5. Inbar, E., “Israeli National Security 1973-1996,” Annals of the American Academy of Political Science, 555, 62, 1998.

  6. Jones, C., “The Foreign Policy of Israel,” in Hinnebusch, R. and Ehteshami, A., The Foreign Policies of Middle East States, Lynne Rienner, Boulder, 2002, pp. 115-136.

  7. Karsh, E., Between War and Peace: Dilemmas of Israelis Security, Cass, London, 1996: Article by Beres, L.R., Israels Bomb in the Basement, pp. 112-133.

  8. Yanai, S., Israel’s Core Security Requirements for a Two-State Solution, Saban Center, Brookings, Washington DC, 2005.


Recommended

  • Asmus, R. and Jackson, B., “Does Israel Belong in the EU and NATO?,” Policy Review 129, Feb./March 2005, pp. 47-56.

  • Bar-Joseph, U., ed., Israel’s National Security: Towards the 21st Century, Portland, Frank Cass, 2001.

  • Bar Joseph, U., “The Paradox of Israeli Power,” Survival, Vol. 46 No. 4, Winter 2004/2005, pp. 137-156.

  • Blackwill, R.D. and Slocombe, W.B., Israel: A Strategic Asset for the US, Washington Institute for Near East Policy, on line 2011.

  • Clifford, C., Counsel to the President: A Memoir, Random House, NY, 1991, pp. 3-25.

  • Byman, D., A High Price: The Triumphs and Failures of Israeli Counterterrorism, Oxford, NY, 2011.

  • Ben Meir, Y., Civil-Military Relations in Israel, Columbia Press, NY, 1995.

  • Ben-Zvi, A., The United States and Israel: The Limits of the Special Relationship, Columbia Press, 1993.

  • Brom, S., Security Implications of Establishing a Palestinian State, Strategic Assessment, Jaffee Center, August 2000, Vol. 3 No. 2.

  • Cohen, A., Israel and the Bomb, Columbia University Press, NY 1998.

  • Cohen, A., The Worst Kept Secret: Israel’s Bargain With the Bomb, Columbia, NY, 2010.

  • Cohen, E.A. et al, Knives, Tanks and Missiles: Israel’s Security Revolution, Washington Institute for Near East Policy, 1998.

  • Cohen, L., “The Israeli Lust for Peace,” Israel Affairs, Vol. 11 No. 4, Fall 2005, pp. 737-763.

  • Cohen, S.L., “The Israel Defense Forces,” in Rubin, B. and Keaney, T.A., eds., Armed Forces in the Middle East: Politics and Strategy, Frank Cass, London, 2002.

  • Cordesman, A.H., Arab-Israeli Military Forces in an Era of Asymmetric Wars, Greenwood, Washington, 2006.

  • Cordesman, A.H., The Israeli Nuclear Reactor Strike and Syrian WMD, CSIS, Washington DC Working Draft,

www.csis.org/media/csis/pubs/071024_syriannucl_weapcontext.pdf.
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