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Texas A & M University Central Texas


POLS 585-110

Seminar: Religion in World Politics

Summer 2011 (10-week Online)


Instructor Information


Instructor: Dan Karppi, Ph.D.

Office: As an adjunct I do not have a TAMU office.

Phone: 254-285-7701 (cell)

Email: dan.karppi@ct.tamus.edu


Office Hours:


As an adjunct I do not hold office hours. However, I will make every effort to be available to students before and after class as needed.


UNILERT: Emergency Warning System for Texas A & M University—Central Texas


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1.0 Course Description and Overview


1.1 Course Description


The TAMUCT Catalog states: “Contents vary according to the needs and desires of students. Independent reading, research, discussion, and writing under personal direction of instructor. May be repeated once for credit when topic varies” (TAMU-CT Catalog, page 201)


1.2 Course Overview


The primary focus of this course is on the role played by religion in world affairs. Attention will focus on the place of religion in current international relations theory; the problem of defining and codifying religious liberty in international law; the extent of religious liberty around the world and its impact on American national security; and the role played by various religious traditions in defining just wars.


2.0 Course Objectives


In general terms, the main objective of this course is for students to gain an understanding of and appreciation for the complexities of religion’s role in world politics. More specifically, students will learn that American policy makers must navigate a world in which views about religion’s role in politics and society vary from country to country. Furthermore, students will learn how America’s commitment to religious liberty impacts its foreign policy.


2.1 Student Learning Outcomes


The following suggest the essence of the course. Upon completion the student should be able to:


  • Discuss the current status of religious liberty in international law.

  • Explain how the level of acceptance of religious liberty around the world impacts American national security.

  • Describe the nature of and reasons for the reemergence of religion in international relations theory and practice.

  • Explain how different world religions approach the problem of war.

  • Critically analyze the argument made by Samuel P. Huntington in his article “The Clash of Civilizations?”


3.0 Required Reading and Text


Drinan, Robert F. 2005. Can God and Caesar Coexist?: Balancing Religious Freedom and

International Law. New Haven: Yale University Press. [ISBN: 9780300111156]


Farr, Thomas F. 2008. World of Faith and Freedom: Why International Religious Liberty is

Vital to American National Security. New York: Oxford University Press.

[ISBN: 9780195179958]


Huntington, Samuel P., ed. 1996. The Clash of Civilizations?: The Debate. New York:

Foreign Affairs. [ISBN: 0876091648]


Micklethwait, John, and Adrian Wooldridge. 2009. God Is Back: How the Global Revival of

Faith is Changing the World. New York: The Penguin Press. [9780143116837]


Petito, Fabio, and Pavlos Hatzopoulos, eds. 2003. Religion in International Relations: The

Return from Exile. Palgrave MacMillan. [ISBN: 9781403962072]


Popovski, Vesselin, Gregory M. Reichberg, and Nicholas Turner, eds. 2009. World Religions

and Norms of War. Tokyo: United Nations University Press. [ISBN: 9789280811636]


NOTE: See section 4.0 below for specific reading assignments. Each course requirement will involve a reading assignment of some sort.


4.0 Course Requirements


4.1 Research Paper (300 points)


In order to successfully complete this assignment, the student must:

1. Select a topic related to religion in world politics and research it in detail.

2. All topics MUST be approved by the instructor BEFORE writing the paper.

3. The paper must include the following elements:

  • A specific argument. This means that I want the student to argue a specific point.

  • Supporting evidence for the argument

4. The paper must comply with the following format guidelines:

  • Typed

  • Fifteen (15) to seventeen (17) pages in length

  • Double spaced

  • One inch margins (top, bottom, left, right)

  • Font style/size: Times New Roman/12 point

5. The paper must be properly documented according to the APSA’s Style Manual for Political Science. This style actually adopts the Chicago Manual of Style (commonly referred to as “Chicago style”) of documenting research. Students must follow the parenthetical citations/reference list form. There are several places where you can find information about this style.

  • American Political Science Association. Committee on Publications. 2006. Style Manual for

Political Science. Washington, D. C.: American Political Science Association. Committee on Publications. [Note: This publication can be viewed online at www.apsanet.org.]

  • Texas A & M (College Station) has a brief handout on its library website that gives an overview of this style.

  • Turabian, Kate L. 2007. A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations. 7th ed. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. [Note: TAMU’s North Campus library has a copy in its reference section. I have placed one copy on reserve at the CTC library]

6. The paper is due on August 4, 2011. Late papers will lose 31 points. Therefore, the highest score a late paper can receive is 269 or “B”. After August 11, 2011, late papers will be accepted at the instructor’s discretion. That is to say, after that date, papers may or may not be accepted.

7. Students who fail to meet the above format guidelines will lose points.

8. The instructor will also evaluate papers based on the student’s competency related to spelling, grammar, and writing skills.

9. Submitting the Paper: Papers must be submitted through the Turnitin link on the “Course Content” page. Do not try to submit your paper directly to Turnitin.com. This will NOT work. Do not email it to me. It MUST be submitted through the Turnitin link. To be counted as on time, the paper must be submitted through the Turnitin link by the due date.

10. Grading and Feedback: Students may turn this assignment in early; however, the instructor will not begin grading this assignment until after the due date. The reason is that the instructor intends to read and grade all the papers at one time. This ensures consistency in assigning grades. Once the grading is complete, the instructor will post grades on Blackboard

10. NOTE: Students who have had any of my classes before are NOT allowed to write about a topic that they may have written about in previous courses with me. In other words, students are not allowed to recycle old term papers.

11. Grades on the paper will be based on:

Component

Points Possible

Argument clearly stated

10

Quality of supporting evidence

200

Extent to which format guidelines are followed

30

Extent to which Turabian documentation is followed

30

Writing components: Style, spelling, grammar, etc.

30

4.2 Book Reviews (3 @ 100 points each)


In order to successfully complete this assignment, the student must:

  1. Write a one-page, single-spaced review of each of the books listed below (see #6).

  2. Each review should have four elements:

    1. What is the author’s primary argument/thesis?

    2. What evidence of support does the author give to defend and/or prove the argument/thesis?

    3. In your view, what are the strengths of the book?

    4. In your view, what are the weaknesses of the book?

  3. Each review should meet the following format guidelines:

    1. It should be typed (Single Space)

    2. The margins should be set at one inch (top, bottom, left, right)

    3. The font style should be Times New Roman.

    4. The font size should be 12 point

  4. Grades for this assignment will be based on the following:

    1. The extent to which you successfully identify the author’s primary argument (10points possible)

    2. The extent to which you identify and summarize the author’s supporting evidence (30 points)

    3. The quality of your evaluation of the strengths of the book (30 points possible)

    4. The quality of your evaluation of the weaknesses of the book (30 points possible)

    5. Failure to follow the format guidelines will result in substantial loss of points.

    6. The instructor will also mark off for poor style, spelling, and grammar.

  5. Submitting the book reviews: Book reviews must be submitted through the Turnitin link on the “Course Content” page. Do not try to submit your paper directly to Turnitin.com. This will NOT work. Do not email it to me. It MUST be submitted through the Turnitin link. To be counted as on time, the paper must be submitted through the Turnitin link by the due date.

Warning: This is not a collaborative activity. Though students will be reviewing the same books, they should refrain from working together on their written reviews. Turnitin will notify the professor of any papers that are the same as or similar to one another. In cases where Turnitin indicates that two students have turned in the same review or reviews that have a high degree of similarity as to indicate collaboration, said students will be subject to sanctions. To avoid this, simply do your own work in your own words.

Warning: If you quote or paraphrase from the book, make sure to include the appropriate parenthetical page reference.


  1. Reviews are due as follows:




Book Review

Due Date

Micklethwait and Wooldridge, God is Back

No later than 6/30/11

Drinan, Can God & Caesar Coexist?

No later than 7/27/11

Farr, World of Faith and Freedom

No later than 8/7/11




  1. Late reviews will be accepted. However, a late paper will be subject to an 11-point penalty. Therefore, the highest score a late review can receive is 89 or B.

  2. Grading and Feedback: Students may turn this assignment in early; however, the instructor will not begin grading this assignment until after the due date. The reason is that the instructor intends to read and grade all the reviews at one time. This ensures consistency in assigning grades. Once the grading is complete, the instructor will post grades on Blackboard. Grades for late reviews may not be posted until finals week.


4.3 Blackboard Discussions


In order to facilitate class participation and critical thinking, students will be required to participate in Blackboard discussions. The topics will relate to the assigned readings. Each discussion is broken down into a Part A and a Part B. In Part A, students will submit their own ideas and responses to the questions posted by the instructor. In Part B, students will read through all of their classmates’ responses and analyze them per the instructor’s directions. A separate discussion board thread is provided by the instructor on Blackboard for each part. Late posts will lose four (4) points. Posts over five (5) days late will not be accepted. In this case a zero will be assigned.


Part A: (3 @ 30 points each)


Discussion

Due Date (No penalty assessed)

Grace Period Due Date (penalty assessed)

Points Possible

1A

No later than 6/19/11

No later than 6/24/11

30

2A

No later than 7/10/11

No later than 7/15/11

30

3A

No later than 7/24/11

No later than 7/29/11

30


Response Guidelines

  • Each response must be at least three paragraphs.

  • Grades will be based on:

  • 1. The extent to which responses demonstrate critical thinking skills.

  • 2. The extent to which the student properly addresses the question(s) presented by the instructor.

  • 3. Proper spelling and grammar must be observed (no text-speak).

  • 4. Responses should observe proper decorum (keep your responses clean and civilized).

  • 5. If asked to defend your comments with evidence, make sure to cite sources.


Part B: (3 @ 30 points each)


Discussion

Due Date (No penalty assessed)

Grace Period Due Date (penalty assessed)

Points Possible

1B

No later than 6/26/11

No later than 7/1/11

30

2B

No later than 7/17/11

No later than 7/22/11

30

3B

No later than 7/31/11

No later than 8/5/11

30


Response Guidelines

  • Each response must be at least three paragraphs.

  • Grades will be based on:

  • 1. The extent to which responses demonstrate critical thinking skills.

  • 2. The extent to which the student properly addresses the question(s) presented by the instructor.

  • 3. Most important, the purpose of your response is to identify what you have learned from your classmates (more detail on this will be provided by the instructor on the Discussion Board).

  • 4. Proper spelling and grammar must be observed (no text-speak).

  • 5. Responses should observe proper decorum (keep your responses clean and civilized).

  • You should refrain from “grading” your classmates’ responses. Instead, responses should be limited to positive comments and substantive criticisms.


4.4 Final Exam (220 points)


The final exam will consist of two (2) essay questions. It will be made available on Blackboard on August 6, 2011. It must be submitted no later than August 11, 2011. As with all assignments in this class, late exams will lose points. Specifically, all late exams (including those accepted late due to an incomplete grade being assigned) will lose 23 points. Therefore, the highest score a late exam can earn is 197 or “B”. Except in cases where the instructor has authorized an incomplete grade in accordance with University policy, no late exams will be accepted after August 14, 2011.


Submitting the exam: The exam must be submitted through the Turnitin link on the Course Content page. Do not try to submit your exam directly to Turnitin.com. This will NOT work. Do not email it to me. It MUST be submitted through the Turnitin link. To be counted as on time, the exam must be submitted through the Turnitin link by the due date.


For more guidance on how to prepare for the final exam, click on the “How to Succeed in this Class” folder found on the Course Content page. Select the file related to the exam.


5.0 Grading Criteria


5.1 Graded assignments


Assignment

Possible Points

Percentage

Research Paper

300

30%

Book Reviews

300 (3 @ 100 each)

30%

Blackboard Discussions Part A

90 (3 @ 30 each)

9%

Blackboard Discussions Part B

90 (3 @ 30 each)

9%

Final Exam

220

22%

TOTAL

1,000

100%


5.2 Final grade calculation


Grade

A

B

C

D

F

Percent

90-100%

80-89%

70-79%

60-69%

0-59%

Points

900-1000

800-899

700-799

600-699

0-599


5.4 Incomplete grades


  • Any missing assignments in your record will be assigned a score of zero.




  • Incomplete grades will be issued at the instructor’s discretion and under the conditions set by University policy. See the Catalog for details.


6.0 Reading and Exam Schedule


Date

Readings

Chapters and/or Pages

June 8

None (Orientation to the Class)




June 9

Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations?

Pages 1-67

June 10

Huntington, The Clash of Civilizations?

Pages 1-67 (cont’d)

June 13

Petito & Hatzopoulos, Religion in International Relations

Authors’ Introduction

June 14

Petito & Hatzopoulos, Religion in International Relations

Chapters 1 & 5

June 15

Petito & Hatzopoulos, Religion in International Relations

Chapters 6 & 7

June 16

Petito & Hatzopoulos, Religion in International Relations

Chapter 8

June 17

None (catch-up on assigned readings)




June 20

Micklethwait & Wooldridge, God Is Back

Authors’ Introduction

June 21

Micklethwait & Wooldridge, God Is Back

Chapters 1, 2, & 3

June 22

Micklethwait & Wooldridge, God Is Back

Chapters 4, 5, & 6

June 23

Micklethwait & Wooldridge, God Is Back

Chapters 7, 8, & 9

June 24

None (catch-up on assigned readings)




June 27

Micklethwait & Wooldridge, God Is Back

Chapters 10, 11, & 12

June 28

Micklethwait & Wooldridge, God Is Back

Authors’ Conclusion

June 29

Popovski, et al., World Religions and Norms of War

Editor’s Introduction

June 30

Popovski, et al., World Religions and Norms of War

Chapters 1 & 5

July 1

Popovski, et al., World Religions and Norms of War

Chapters 6 & 8

July 5

Popovski, et al., World Religions and Norms of War

Chapters 9 &10

July 6

Popovski, et al., World Religions and Norms of War

Chapter 11

July 7

None (catch-up on assigned readings)




July 8

None (catch-up on assigned readings)




July 11

Drinan, Can God & Caesar Coexist?

Chapters 1 & 2

July 12

Drinan, Can God & Caesar Coexist?

Chapters 3 & 4

July 13

Drinan, Can God & Caesar Coexist?

Chapter s 5 & 6

July 14

Drinan, Can God & Caesar Coexist?

Chapters 7 & 8

July 15

None (catch-up on assigned readings)




July 18

Drinan, Can God & Caesar Coexist?

Chapter 9 & 10

July 19

Drinan, Can God & Caesar Coexist?

Chapters 11 & 12

July 20

Drinan, Can God & Caesar Coexist?

Chapter 13

July 21

None (catch-up on assigned readings)




July 22

None (catch-up on assigned readings)




July 25

Farr, World of Faith and Freedom

Author’s Introduction

July 26

Farr, World of Faith and Freedom

Author’s Introduction

Chapter 1

July 27

Farr, World of Faith and Freedom

Chapters 2 & 3

July 28

Farr, World of Faith and Freedom

Chapters 4 & 5

July 29

None (catch-up on assigned readings)

Chapter s 6 & 7

August 1

Farr, World of Faith and Freedom

Chapter 8 & 9

August 2

Farr, World of Faith and Freedom

Chapter 10 & Conclusion

August 3

None (catch-up on assigned readings)




August 4

None (catch-up on assigned readings)




August 5

None (catch-up on assigned readings)




August 6 & 7

None (final exam available)




August 8

None (final exam available)




August 9

None (final exam available)




August 10

None (final exam available)




August 11

Final Exam Due




7.0 Summary of Important Due Dates


Due Date

Assignment

June 19

Discussion 1A

June 24

Discussion 1A (Grace period for late discussions. Penalty will be assessed)

June 26

Discussion 1B

June 30

Book Review: Micklethwait & Wooldridge, God is Back

July 1

Discussion 1B (Grace period for late discussions. Penalty will be assessed)

July 10

Discussion 2A

July 15

Discussion 2A (Grace period for late discussions. Penalty will be assessed)

July 17

Discussion 2B

July 22

Discussion 2B (Grace period for late discussions. Penalty will be assessed)

July 24

Discussion 3A

July 27

Book Review: Drinan, Can God & Caesar Coexist?

July 29

Discussion 3A (Grace period for late discussions. Penalty will be assessed)

July 31

Discussion 3B

August 4

Research Paper

August 5

Discussion 3B (Grace period for late discussions. Penalty will be assessed)

August 7

Book Review: Farr, World of Faith and Freedom

August 11

Final Exam

NOTE: All missing/late assignments must be turned in


8.0 Classroom Decorum


8.1 Class Discussion


Students are reminded to observe proper decorum when engaging in classroom discussion. Foul language and hostile debate are not constructive to the learning process and will not be tolerated.


9.0 Drop Policy


If you discover that you need to drop this class, you must go to the Records Office and ask for the necessary paperwork. Professors cannot drop students; this is always the responsibility of the student. The record’s office will provide a deadline by which the form must be returned, completed, and signed. Once you return the signed form to the records office and wait 24 hours, you must go into Duck Trax and confirm that you are no longer enrolled. If you are still enrolled, FOLLOW-UP with the records office immediately. You are to attend class until the procedure is complete to avoid penalty for absence. Should you miss the deadline or fail to follow the procedure, you will receive an F in the course. For complete details about the University’s drop policy and procedure, consult page 66 of the TSU Catalog.


10.0 Academic Honesty


Texas A & M University—Central Texas expects all students to maintain high standards of personal and scholarly conduct. It is the scholarly responsibility of the student to understand what plagiarism means. Students guilty of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary action. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating on an examination or other academic work, plagiarism, collusion, and the abuse of resource materials. The faculty member is responsible for initiating action for each case of academic dishonesty


11.0 Disability Support Services


It is the policy of Texas A & M University—Central Texas to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act and other applicable laws. If you have or believe you have a disability, you may wish to self-identify. You can do so by providing documentation to the Academic Support Programs Coordinator. Students are encouraged to seek information about accommodations to help assure success in this class. Please contact Ryan Thompson at (254) 519-5796 or visit the Main Building (on Clear Creek Drive), Room 114. Additional information can be found at http://TAMUCT.org/StudentAffairs.


12.0 Smarthinking


This is an online tutoring platform that enables TAMU-CT students to log-in and receive FREE online tutoring and writing support. This tool provides tutoring in Mathematics, Writing, General and Organic Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology, Accounting, Economics, Introductory Finance, Spanish, and Statistics.


Students will have access to Smarthinking after 5:00 p.m. on the 4th class day. Students may gain access by going to smarthinking.com and entering their University Student ID as their username and Birthday (mmddyyy) as their password. Once you log-in, you have the option to change your log-in information. If you have difficulties, contact Student Affairs at 254-519-5721.


13.0 Library Services


INFORMATION LITERACY focuses on research skills which prepare individuals to live and work in an information-centered society. Librarians will work with students in the development of critical reasoning, ethical use of information, and the appropriate use of secondary research techniques. Help may include, yet is not limited to: exploration of information resources such as library collections and services, identification of subject databases and scholarly journals, and execution of effective research strategies. Library Resources are outlined and accessed at: http://www.tarleton.edu/centraltexas/departments/library/


Texas A & M University—Central Texas shares library space and materials with the Oveta Culp Hobby Library at Central Texas College in Killeen (Bldg. 102).


14.0 Teaching Philosophy


Learning is something that one does actively. It is not something that one does passively. My goal is to facilitate the activity of learning. To do this, my classes emphasize two things. The first is lecture. This is where students are presented with the essentials of the course material. Class discussion is an important part of the lecture process, as it gives students a chance to apply what they have learned. It is essential that students maintain good attendance. The second is the work done by students outside of class. This includes reading all the assigned chapters completely. It also includes working on the exam review sheets provided by the instructor. In short, students are responsible for their own learning.


Revised 6/02/11 Page


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